Should I apply for this job?

  1. 0 Hi Everyone,

    I'm currently in my final practicum placed in a community mental health organization where they help people get off the streets into homes. It's a really great organization and I love having my clinical there. One of the nurses just left and I am debating whether to apply for the empty position. I graduate in less than a month and would need to apply very soon.

    I plan to move to Vancouver from Alberta in summer 2013 as I said in a previous post and wonder if it would be easier to find a job in Vancouver with hospital experience over community? Should I go with the basics in the hospital or go for this job that will give me experience in a field I want to work in?

    In the future, I hope to continue working with the homeless population. Any advice?
  2. Poll: Should I apply for this job?

    • Yes

      100.00% 6
    • No

      0% 0
    6 Votes
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  4. Visit  cris23 profile page

    About cris23

    Joined Feb '12; Posts: 3.

    15 Comments so far...

  5. Visit  Dela RN profile page
    0
    It doesn't hurt to apply since you don't know if you'll get it or not. Let that make your initial decision for you.
  6. Visit  MPKH profile page
    1
    I'm from Vancouver and I moved to Alberta for a job. Not much jobs in Vancouver, especially if you're a relatively new nurse.

    It definitely doesn't hurt to try for the job, get some experience and go from there.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  7. Visit  Alka_Selse BSc profile page
    0
    @Diffindo - I'm from Vancouver as well, and it's so strange. I keep seeing all over the forums how hard it is to find a job, but I did a Fraser Health job search a couple weeks ago and there must have been 50+ postings looking for RNs ranging from Vancouver to Chilliwack. And with contacts in some of the major hospitals, they're always saying that they're on the look out for nurses. Did you find that the lack of jobs was specific to newly graduated nurses? And have you considered doing a BCIT equivalent specialization course (for example, going into hemodialysis) to score those more specialized postings? Or do they tend to require a certain number of years experience?

    I'm going into nursing this year, so don't know the ins and outs, yet, but am looking to absorb any information I can!
  8. Visit  MPKH profile page
    2
    Quote from Alka_Selse BSc
    @Diffindo - I'm from Vancouver as well, and it's so strange. I keep seeing all over the forums how hard it is to find a job, but I did a Fraser Health job search a couple weeks ago and there must have been 50+ postings looking for RNs ranging from Vancouver to Chilliwack. And with contacts in some of the major hospitals, they're always saying that they're on the look out for nurses. Did you find that the lack of jobs was specific to newly graduated nurses? And have you considered doing a BCIT equivalent specialization course (for example, going into hemodialysis) to score those more specialized postings? Or do they tend to require a certain number of years experience?

    I'm going into nursing this year, so don't know the ins and outs, yet, but am looking to absorb any information I can!
    Just because there are job postings doesn't mean that there are actual vancancies to be filled. The hospital may not have the money to fill that vacancy, but they're obligated to post up the posting anyway, due to HR protocols. As well, internal applicants will often get the job over external applicants, so while you may see the posting, the job may have already went to somebody else...and sometimes, a job posting is posted with a candidate in mind--the posting is just up as per protocol.

    It is hard to find a job in general, but especially more so when you're a new grad nurse with nothing to offer to the hospitals. It cost the hospitals money and time to train new grads; time and money they don't have to spend if they recruited nurses with experience. Once you get your foot in the door and have some experience, more opportunities will open up to you...but the hard part is getting your foot in the door.

    I am looking to specialize in ICU nursing as a goal...so I'll just have to convince someone in Calgary or Edmonton to take me on. Good luck with your education!
    Fiona59 and joanna73 like this.
  9. Visit  Alka_Selse BSc profile page
    0
    True, that is a good point. I didn't realize there was an HR protocol stating that the jobs must be posted even if they weren't intending to fill them from external sources, or not at all. Do you have any suggestions, or have you heard any suggestions, for new graduates to help get their foot in the door and get that first amount of experience to build from? When jobs are short, are there opportunities for something like volunteering on-call shifts at the very least? Or do initial employment opportunities tend to be made during the education process?

    I spent some volunteer shifts in the CCU at St. Paul's hospital. Though not quite the same environment as ICU, I got to tour both, and it was really interesting. So far, I'm leaning towards CCU, myself, but who knows what will change during school.

    Thank you for your reply, by the way, and for the luck! Though I hope I don't need it, heh.
  10. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    2
    @ Diffindo: if you gain at least 12-18 months in Acute Care in the city, an ICU would be more likely to hire you. Also see what kind of critical care courses you might do. Good luck Better you than me. I want the OR eventually.
    MPKH and Fiona59 like this.
  11. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    Back to the Dialysis training, it's not the place for a new grad!! You need good assessment skills on top of your dialysis training.

    Also, why would you pay for the training when it's provided by the employer? You have to be certified by your health authority that you meet their standards, have performed the supervised hours, passed the exam, etc. Maybe this poster is mixing it up with the national nephrology certificate?
  12. Visit  MPKH profile page
    0
    Quote from joanna73
    @ Diffindo: if you gain at least 12-18 months in Acute Care in the city, an ICU would be more likely to hire you. Also see what kind of critical care courses you might do. Good luck Better you than me. I want the OR eventually.
    I'm currently working in the acute care unit at a rural hospital and I'm learning so much! Much more than what I would've learned in a city med-surg unit! I'm seeing stuff that I've never seen before, learning how to do Charge, and even the opportunity to stabilize and prepare patients before we ship them off to the ICU in the city! I miss the city yes, but the amazing learning opportunities that I'm experiencing at where I am is superb and will hopefully nicely prepare me for the ICU!

    Good luck for OR too! By the way, do you know where I can take critical care courses in Alberta?
  13. Visit  Alka_Selse BSc profile page
    0
    Quote from Fiona59
    Back to the Dialysis training, it's not the place for a new grad!! You need good assessment skills on top of your dialysis training.

    Also, why would you pay for the training when it's provided by the employer? You have to be certified by your health authority that you meet their standards, have performed the supervised hours, passed the exam, etc. Maybe this poster is mixing it up with the national nephrology certificate?
    I don't recall saying that you would have to pay for the training. From what I understand, it is the national nephrology certificate that's required, like you've mentioned. And it was more of an example. I know that CCU, Peritoneal dialysis, and hemodialysis all require additional specialization certificates from BCIT on top of your BSN.

    Aside from that, the point of my question was more along the lines of "are new grads advised against trying to go into any specialties for X amount of time?" And how do new grads generally get their foot in the door? For those RNs who are posting, how did you start out after school?
  14. Visit  MPKH profile page
    0
    Quote from Alka_Selse BSc
    Do you have any suggestions, or have you heard any suggestions, for new graduates to help get their foot in the door and get that first amount of experience to build from? When jobs are short, are there opportunities for something like volunteering on-call shifts at the very least? Or do initial employment opportunities tend to be made during the education process?
    Some people in my class got jobs through connections and network, so I would definitely suggest you to start making your connections and building your network in nursing school. Whenever you do clinicals at hospital units, make a good impression while you're there--let the manager know your interest in working there after graduation, and follow up.

    Another suggestion is to work as an employed student nurse--a few people in my class got job offers on the unit that they worked as an employed student nurse. However, in my class, I would say about 5% of the people who held an employed student nurse position actually got a job on the unit that they worked at.

    Another way is to luck out and get a final practicum on a specialty area--all the people who got a full time line from my graduation class did so by competing for a final practicum in a highly specialized area, did a great job at the practicum and were offered jobs like that. But I only recommend this if you're absolutely sure of the speciality you want before trying to get a job this way.

    I'm not too sure about volunteering on call shifts--you may be able to score a casual or an on call line. There aren't very many full time lines for new grads. Jobs in the city are scarce, and your best bet is to find a job in a rural area. Rural hospitals are always needing nurses, and they often are more than happy to hire a new grad and train them. As well, rural hospitals offer very good experience for the new grad...but you have to be willing to sacrifice what you love and know about city living, and leave that all behind. Also try to apply for LTC and nursing homes, clinics, doctor's offices, whatever job ads you see that you're remotely fit for in terms of criteria. Other than that, I have no real suggestions other than to keep trying, keep polishing that resume and cover letter, and to keep practicing your interview skills.

    Health authorities offer new grad positions a few times a year (coinciding with graduation times), so there are opportunites spread throughout the year...but if you read posts on here, you will know that it is more the exception than the norm to have a job offer waiting for you by the time you graduate. The competition is fierce, and with the nursing shortage promised by the media to be nowhere in sight, new grads are having a hard time trying to find a job vacancy in a saturated market.

    Best of luck =)
  15. Visit  Alka_Selse BSc profile page
    0
    Quote from Diffindo_lumos
    By the way, do you know where I can take critical care courses in Alberta?
    It looks like Mount Royal College in Calgary has advanced critical care nursing; the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary both have Critical Care divisions, but it appears to be focused more towards medicine than nursing - I'm not sure how much courses for the two would overlap. Online, eCampusAlberta has the ACCN certificate available. I don't know anything about the experience of taking courses through them, however. I can't find anything more than that, but it's a basis to start from, at least.
  16. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    Quote from Alka_Selse BSc
    I don't recall saying that you would have to pay for the training. From what I understand, it is the national nephrology certificate that's required, like you've mentioned. And it was more of an example. I know that CCU, Peritoneal dialysis, and hemodialysis all require additional specialization certificates from BCIT on top of your BSN.

    Aside from that, the point of my question was more along the lines of "are new grads advised against trying to go into any specialties for X amount of time?" And how do new grads generally get their foot in the door? For those RNs who are posting, how did you start out after school?
    BCIT doesn't provide free education. You will pay for their courses.

    I'm an LPN who graduated in the last decade when no-one was hiring full time nurses of either grade. I wound up working four casual jobs at one point to be able to repay my loans. You simply cannot be picky and hold out for a dream job. LTC, Community Health, and Acute Care were the places that would hire casual. You had to be available for any shift because the permanent part time staff get first pick. The casuals get the leftovers. Many times I'd get called at 22hr to see if I could be there for a night shift. Many pay periods there was only one or two shifts on a cheque.

    AHS provides paid training in dialysis for both LPNs and RNs who are going to work on the dialysis units. Peritoneal patients often wind up on general medicine units and the Nephrology staff drop by to monitor their progress. Many peritoneal patients are capable of managing their own care and often perform their dialysis on units with supplies being delivered and staff checking on them. Won't even go near the topic of patients who perform home hemodialysis.


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