RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? - page 8

by willow2004 35,859 Views | 85 Comments

I've been looking for information on nursing and the different levels of nursing. I'm getting a little confused. Are RPN/LPN/RNA all the same??? Also, I heard from a friend that Practical Nursing is going to be phased out in... Read More


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    What is also sad is your attitide towards RNs. To imply that RNs are lazy and stupid with bad attitudes says more about you than them. The RNs I work with are generally intelligent hard working nurses and to state that PNs are more skilled or knowledgeable is unfair.
    linzz and Fiona59 like this.
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    If you read what I posted, I said its sad that SOME
    I did not imply all RN's and if you read the above postings you would have read that we were also including charge nurses.
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    I am sorry to hear your experiences with RNs have been so negative. I have been blessed with wonderful ladies to work along side including our charge who is smart, funny, works like a horse and leads us by shining example.
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    Hi in Quebec we are called LPNs now.....when signing our charts ( nuirsing notes) when can sign with the title lpn...ask the oiiaq
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    They shouldn't make being a RN so difficult by having to get a degree because we already know just as much or more then they do.
    This attitude will get you into a lot of trouble.

    As I have posted many times in this thread the differences in scope of practice between the RN and LPN are not well understood. But there are differences!

    In my experience it is the LPN's who understand this the least. And the people who understand it the best are LPN's who have gone on to obtain their RN degree.
    Its all just in the experience.
    There is also the matter of education. There is absolutely no way that a 1 or two year diploma prepares a nurse to work in the same capacity as a 4 year university degree.

    While experience is important that experience is more valuable when interpreted through the broader knowledge base of a university education.

    We must also remember that there are varying levels of expertise and motivation among all nurses and that includes LPN's and RN's alike. Additionally not all RN's in the system have a university degree. The requirement for a university degree to become a RN is new in many provinces. Quebec may be the last hold out on this.
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    Quote from RN_Canada
    This attitude will get you into a lot of trouble.


    In my experience it is the LPN's who understand this the least. And the people who understand it the best are LPN's who have gone on to obtain their RN degree.

    There is also the matter of education. There is absolutely no way that a 1 or two year diploma prepares a nurse to work in the same capacity as a 4 year university degree.

    While experience is important that experience is more valuable when interpreted through the broader knowledge base of a university education.

    We must also remember that there are varying levels of expertise and motivation among all nurses and that includes LPN's and RN's alike. Additionally not all RN's in the system have a university degree. The requirement for a university degree to become a RN is new in many provinces. Quebec may be the last hold out on this.


    So tell us how you really feel.

    Are you telling me that the two year diploma/hospital trained RNs aren't as "prepared" as a BScN? That ADNs from the US who have moved and are working here aren't as "good" as the Canadian BScN.

    I had thought that the ability to pass the CRNE was the deciding factor on well an RN was prepared to practice.

    I know several LPNs who have become RNs via the diploma (before it was axed) and degree route. Many have not expressed your views. They felt that an unnecessary amount of time was spent writing essays and taking basic Arts courses. Yes, many disease processes were studied in a more indepth process at the RN level BUT and this is a big BUT I've worked with several LPNs who were "the ostomy nurse" or whatever to go to when indepth teaching was required. Because these nurses loved a particular area of care and learned everything they could about it. These LPNs were motivated by their desire to learn and be the best nurse that they could be in that particular area.

    I work with many LPNs who have degrees in fields other than nursing. All can write great essays in their related areas.

    Back in the '70s when the BScN was becoming an option for nursing education, these nurses were meant to be "streamed" towards management level positions. Now what many of see in the degree holding new grads is an attitude that hands on, bedside care is beneath them.
    linzz likes this.
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    [quote=loriangel14;2868115]i disagree. the role of the rpn in ontario is growing, with employers using rpns in ever expanding roles. most acute care facilities in my area are very rpn friendly. the trend here is growth not dying. remember this is canada, not the us. things are different up here.


    i agree....i am currently taking the psw program through fanshawe college and we are being told the scope of a psw in the near future is going to entail more of what the rpn's are doing. and the scope of the rpn is going to broaden and cover a lot of what the rn's are doing. the roles in the health care team are definatley changing and growing, but rpn is not being phased out!!! if it is i'm in trouble...i start an rpn program through humber in september!!!!
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    From what PNs educated in AB and Ontario have been able to determine it appears as if the current PN diploma curriculum is very, very close to the old diploma RN programs.
    linzz likes this.
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    What I find frustrating is that even though I have a degree with good marks, I am still required to do all kinds of arts courses if I were to obtain a BSN. I can see having to do the nursing courses and clinicals but doing arts courses over again, some of which are the exact same courses I took years ago, is just a cash grab.

    I know that I can write a university level paper and my degree should be enough evidence of that.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    [quote=studentnurse75;3725075]
    Quote from loriangel14
    i disagree. the role of the rpn in ontario is growing, with employers using rpns in ever expanding roles. most acute care facilities in my area are very rpn friendly. the trend here is growth not dying. remember this is canada, not the us. things are different up here.
    Quote from loriangel14


    i agree....i am currently taking the psw program through fanshawe college and we are being told the scope of a psw in the near future is going to entail more of what the rpn's are doing. and the scope of the rpn is going to broaden and cover a lot of what the rn's are doing. the roles in the health care team are definatley changing and growing, but rpn is not being phased out!!! if it is i'm in trouble...i start an rpn program through humber in september!!!!
    this is true to an extent but you may find that each workplace will have it's own policies on what rn's and rpn's will be allowed to do. some workplaces will let rpn's do many things and work at full scope and others will limit your scope of practice. the key is to work somewhere that makes good use of your skills if that is important to you.
    Trulibra likes this.


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