Nursing in Alberta - page 2

by UK_RN_AJ

4,142 Visits | 36 Comments

Hi all I am a UK Staff nurse currently working within an emergency department in the UK with a view to move to Canada within the next year or so, I have sent all my applications away and am currently waiting to see if I need... Read More


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    Yes Fiona is right. The big issue is the scarcity of jobs.
    joanna73 and Fiona59 like this.
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    Generally, everyone hopes to settle in the major cities: Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Halifax. That isn't where the majority of the jobs are. Fiona is correct...Canada is also facing the tail end of this global recession. Many Canadian nurses are underemployed, and there is no recruitment for IEN's, including American nurses at the moment. The processing will take time, and if you are serious about working, there are jobs in rural areas, not the cities (in huge numbers).
    Fiona59 and loriangel14 like this.
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    Very true. There are jobs in my area but they are in small hospitals and community nursing.
    joanna73 and Fiona59 like this.
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    I've decided to move to Calgary sometime next spring, with or without a job. I need to get out of where I am d/t boredom, and Calgary is closer to a family member. However, I'm realistic that it may take a few months to land even a casual position, AND that I may need to return to small towns for contract or locum work, which is fine. The key is, you need to have some sort of a plan and be flexible with respect to work, especially coming from another country right now.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Quote from UK_RN_AJ

    From there there are two options from what I can work out , firstly apply for a temporary workers permit which permits you to work for six months with options to extend or apply for permanent residence from within Canada. Or you can go for a full immigration process under the FSW Program which I believe is not open again till 2013.

    If I'm wrong on this please correct me .
    Correct as in the new list doesn't come out until Jan 2013 however a TWP (temp work permit) is issued between 1-3 years depending on what the LMO states. I have been working with a TWP for the last 2 years and have another year to go however after much time and at times little patience I have now been granted PR and just waiting for final piece of paper so I can go and 'land' PR process took me over 2 years and that was applying from within Canada but expect the same time frame whether in or out of Canada. If any less then think of it as a bonus. Also be aware there are changes and regardless of country living or born in for PR an English or French exam is required, There is also talk that apart from meeting College requirements you have to prove qualifications to immigration.

    nursesmarty I seriously doubt you will be able to get everything sorted and be in Canada working by the end of 2013 and as mentioned if a USC then you should be able to use NAFTA but will still require employer and letter of employment as well as passed CRNE (most employers will not look at you unless you have eligibility to sit CRNE or have passed CRNE)
    joanna73, Fiona59, and UK_RN_AJ like this.
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    Quote from Silverdragon102
    Correct as in the new list doesn't come out until Jan 2013 however a TWP (temp work permit) is issued between 1-3 years depending on what the LMO states. I have been working with a TWP for the last 2 years and have another year to go however after much time and at times little patience I have now been granted PR and just waiting for final piece of paper so I can go and 'land' PR process took me over 2 years and that was applying from within Canada but expect the same time frame whether in or out of Canada. If any less then think of it as a bonus. Also be aware there are changes and regardless of country living or born in for PR an English or French exam is required, There is also talk that apart from meeting College requirements you have to prove qualifications to immigration.
    Thanks for the Clarification Siverdragon102. Yeah I'm hoping that once I have completed all the Nurse application side of the process, and have a job offer(I am prepared for the wait ). I can make my way down that route, right now its save save save, lots of agency work and begin working on transferable courses such as ACLS and TNCC.
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    ACLS and TNCC I am not sure if transferrable that would be something you need to review with employer once you find one. They may expect you to take Canadian just in case there is anything different.

    If you have a job offer then you can get a TWP and work in Canada whilst waiting for PR. Either way you will have to apply as a medical will be required even for TWP so if still in the UK you will have to send forms to Canadian embassy in London and wait for them to ask you to go for a medical.
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Nov 27, '12 : Reason: add
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    Today there are 22 LPN jobs and 123 RN jobs listed on the public AHS Calgary jobsite.

    Things that make you go hmmmm....
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    Juli, many of those jobs will never be filled and we know it. Many of them are filled by casuals from the float pool on a semipermanent basis.

    Units with a high turnover are always posted. I know by looking at the board for my hospital which unit I will never set foot on (word of mouth travels fast) and that the job will go to a new grad.

    I know of one UM who will always hire a new grad because they are cheaper and she has a huge turnover. Morale sucks on that unit. She claims no experienced staff apply. That's not true. She goes for cost not experience.

    The ER at my hospital is constantly looking for LPNs, they get hired and leave. Reason: bullying by UNA members who don't want LPNs on their turf, no matter how experienced on skilled those nurses are. PostPartum always has vacancies for exactly the same reason.
    joanna73 likes this.
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    Jobs such as rehab, ortho, medicine and med surg are always posted in every Province and will also accept new grads. I've currently been searching for a couple months to get a feel for the market. Of course. You know why? Because those units are chronically understaffed, with a heavy workload. After a period of time, nurses run from the units I've listed. The specialties either want current experience, or they are willing to pay for training in the specialty. The catch is, you sign a contract and work in a rural area. Then, there is the other game of posting positions which will sit unfilled for months, but the Unions are happy. I'm saving my money, because I'm prepared that I may not work for several months, or casual at best in Calgary, or that I may have to take a contract somewhere. The market still sucks.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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