Northwest Territories - page 2

I was browsing and found there is a need for some nurses in Nunavut. I also noted how high these nurses are paid. Have any of you worked in the territories? What was your experience? Please see one... Read More

  1. Visit  Fiona59} profile page
    1
    Factor in cultural differences. They are huge. A few that have been patients on my unit have huge trust issues due to the residential school debacle.

    I've worked with Inuit patients who don't speak English or French. Communication can be difficult.

    The majority have been lovely people. But they do have very different expectations and views.
    joanna73 likes this.
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  3. Visit  Trishrpn80} profile page
    0
    There are alot of cultural differences.. I work with Cree pt's where i am.. Communication can be an issue but usually they have staff on for translation And if u r like me u try to pick up the local language.. I speak Creenglish

    A good majority in the bigger centres speak english (whitehorse, yellowknife etc)... U have to be prepared for the differences in health management.. Higher incidence of mental health, diabetes, cardiac, renal.. Depending on where u go and what experience u have now u will probably learn alot.. Dont expect to be like the miners and come out with crazy cash lol i am ahead now but i sacrificed a yr in isolation (fly in only)..

    If u have questions let me know.. Ive worked with nurses who have been to the territories and nunavut.. Good luck..
  4. Visit  iluvnursingtoronto} profile page
    0
    Having been around the world, I think that if you have the will and the dedication, you can succeed in nursing there long term. It is best to be realistic, and really do your research so that you go in prepared. The conditions sound harsh, so good luck!!!!
  5. Visit  Fiona59} profile page
    1
    Quote from iluvnursingtoronto
    Having been around the world, I think that if you have the will and the dedication, you can succeed in nursing there long term. It is best to be realistic, and really do your research so that you go in prepared. The conditions sound harsh, so good luck!!!!
    How long have you been working in Canada?

    Harsh, doesn't even begin to describe the conditions up there. Over the years many posters have said they are going north, very few have ever reported back. Trish is one of the few, so she knows.

    I've worked with nurses who have been up there and many of my patients are the ones medi-vac'd south for treatment.

    Will and dedication isn't going to get you anywhere if the local don't take to you.
    joanna73 likes this.
  6. Visit  Trishrpn80} profile page
    1
    Fiona.. i remember my first threads asking about northern nursing and the low response rate from ppl who have done it lol...

    Fiona is right.. It is harsh..

    As i have maintained it takes a certain personality to endure Northern nursing.. I have always wanted to do this and i love where i am and what i am doing.. It does take its toll on u emotionally sometimes.. Nursing shortage up here is waaay worse than in the south.. Ppl come up with good intentions but they dont last and a constant turnover does get annoying...

    I say give it a whirl but be prepared that it may not be what u expect and u may not be able to pay off what u hope.. Bigger towns like yellowknife may be a good intro
    Fiona59 likes this.
  7. Visit  Trishrpn80} profile page
    2
    Quote from Fiona59

    Will and dedication isn't going to get you anywhere if the local don't take to you.
    Nursing up here is difficult when dealing with locals.. They do not trust easy and because of the turnover it can be difficult for compliance.. I recommend that u attempt to be part of the community.. Locals appreciate it and it makes ur experience more worthwhile.. (In my opinion)
    joanna73 and Fiona59 like this.
  8. Visit  Traveller12} profile page
    3
    I've lived in Nunavut over the last few years and now travel there for casual assignments. I had a great deal of issues with the GN (very understaffed and unfortunately very unorganized) so after a few years I decided to resign and go with agency. There are two agencies with the northern contract that are based out of Winnipeg (you can google them). If you go with government you pay rent but if you go with agency rent is covered and so are per diems daily. It's also nice to be able to travel to different communities for a few weeks at a time and have your airfare paid back home (I used to pay $3000 alone to get home for vacation). Cost of living is very expensive so doing short stints with agency is kinda the best of it all. Wonderful culture and beautiful landscapes- I love heading back up to see friends. I originally went up to expand my scope and also try to sock away some money- unfortunately even with those big wages and bonuses the cost of living and being able to leave to see family means you really don't make that much more than if you had stayed in the south and done some OT. Travel assignments are great for experience and savings but you really do need to be ready to hit the ground running as soon as you land in the community. Hope that helps.
    CarMcK, Fiona59, and joanna73 like this.
  9. Visit  katherine100} profile page
    0
    Thanks traveller. Good advice
  10. Visit  redbombRNBN} profile page
    0
    So I've been nursing for about 3 years in Cardiac and I'm looking to go to Nunavut to try something different. I've worked in fly-in only communities previously and didn't mind it (Northern BC). Should I apply to go with an Agency or through the hospital (Iqaluit)? Any agency in particular out of Winnipeg I should research? Any input would be much appreciated, thanks for your time


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