I love nursing in Canada because... I love nursing in Canada because... | allnurses

I love nursing in Canada because...

  1. 0 I am starting this thread because I would like feedback on the positives about nursing in Canada. I hear so much about people moving to the US and I would love to hear from those who are staying, living and nursing in Canada.

    Cheers,
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  2. 58 Comments

  3. Visit  fergus51 profile page
    #1 0
    I've done both... I love nursing in Canada because:
    1. Money is not an issue for our patients, ever. I never feel pressured to deliver the cheapest care possible.
    2. Unions. Thank God for unions.
    3. Decent ratios and decent pay (see #3 for why).
    4. Less emphasis on "customer" servive. Patients are still patients here (or clients, but NOT customers).
    5. I still feel like ethical patient care is the goal and more important than other concerns.
  4. Visit  tutusandfrogs profile page
    #2 0
    btt as a potential nursing student... would like to see more replies?
  5. Visit  pugmum profile page
    #3 0
    Quote from fergus51
    I've done both... I love nursing in Canada because:
    1. Money is not an issue for our patients, ever. I never feel pressured to deliver the cheapest care possible.
    2. Unions. Thank God for unions.
    3. Decent ratios and decent pay (see #3 for why).
    4. Less emphasis on "customer" servive. Patients are still patients here (or clients, but NOT customers).
    5. I still feel like ethical patient care is the goal and more important than other concerns.
    Amen!

    I like to live and work where healthcare is assumed to be more of a right than a priviledge.
    I like not having to keep track of every pill and bandage.
    Even though management will scream about expenses, they will/try to come through with extra staff/equipment when needed (at least for the most part).
    Cheaper meds.

    and again, ferus's post ...ditto for me!
  6. Visit  pugmum profile page
    #4 0
    PS. I should have added that nursing in Canada means you get to live here, too! :wink2:
  7. Visit  fergus51 profile page
    #5 0
    Quote from sickandtired
    PS. I should have added that nursing in Canada means you get to live here, too! :wink2:
    :chuckle I do miss that part of it but, I have to say, the weather is a lot nicer in California
  8. Visit  Camelhappy1 profile page
    #6 0
    UNIONS!

    TO be honest, I felt more valued by society as an RN in Canada than here in the US.... maybe more "respect" is the word I am looking for.

    I hate having to see signs around the hospital that state: "customer" I definately feel much different as an RN in the US than in Canada!
  9. Visit  Zari.SVN profile page
    #7 0
    Quote from bizzymum919
    i am starting this thread because i would like feedback on the positives about nursing in canada. i hear so much about people moving to the us and i would love to hear from those who are staying, living and nursing in canada.

    cheers,
    hi there i'm sooo glad i came across this thread. i am a nursing student in the us currently in texas but i want to work elswhere. i will be graduating with a lvn/lpn equivalent to your rpn. is this something very complicated i have looked on the websites, but i'd rather here froom some of you guys/

    thanks!
  10. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    #8 0
    Hope you are pro union as most LPNs in Canada are unionized and benefit from it.

    Check your PMs.
  11. Visit  Zari.SVN profile page
    #9 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    Hope you are pro union as most LPNs in Canada are unionized and benefit from it.

    Check your PMs.
    Here an LVN goes to school for 1 year. We alos have a position called CNA, they go less time than that. A LVN can go back to school one more year to get his/her RN. I have heard that in Canada you are required more school for equivalent positions, I just did not know how much truth there was to it . At any rate an LVN's starting wages can be 15.00-17.00 USD per hour. How is the salary there do you know ? Also what is Canada's warmest province ?
  12. Visit  Bicycleboy profile page
    #10 0
    Quote from Zari.SVN
    Here an LVN goes to school for 1 year. We alos have a position called CNA, they go less time than that. A LVN can go back to school one more year to get his/her RN. I have heard that in Canada you are required more school for equivalent positions, I just did not know how much truth there was to it . At any rate an LVN's starting wages can be 15.00-17.00 USD per hour. How is the salary there do you know ? Also what is Canada's warmest province ?
    If you are not already an RN you need to get your BScN which takes 4 years. I think even if you are an RPN you still have to take the 4 year course. I am not 100% sure about my last statement but I mention it because in my first year class there are RPN's starting right at the bottom with the rest of us.

    Canada's warmest province is Florida, after that it is southwestern BC right on the coast. I have read that places on Vancouver Island are the sunniest in Canada. But in the summer it is probably not the hottest, the weather there is moderated by the Pacific.

    I cannot quote salaries since I am just a student in first year, bit I think they may be comprable to the USA if cost of living is factored in, unless you live in southern Ont.
  13. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    #11 0
    Reg. PN only exists in Ontario, in Western Canada RPN is a Reg. Psych Nurse (a RN who works in Mental Health settings).

    Vancouver Island is rainy. Trust me wet cold is worse than dry cold. At least on the Prairies you can keep adding layers, but once your cold and wet game over.

    Wages vary province to province. So, that one is up to the individual to decide, what's affordable and what's not. I actually found BC cheaper to live in than Alberta, due to the make up of property taxes and user fees, and utility cost were much cheaper in BC. Food is pretty much the same, just the cost of produce seems to vary greatly.

    PN to RN bridges do exist (GMCC in Alberta, Malaspina on VI) Usually you do a "bridge"/transition course and enter the second year of the four year diploma.
  14. Visit  pugmum profile page
    #12 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    ....
    PN to RN bridges do exist (GMCC in Alberta, Malaspina on VI) Usually you do a "bridge"/transition course and enter the second year of the four year diploma.
    Could you tell me more about the Malaspina bridge program? I am working with an LPN and she is going through Athabasca because she said there wasn't a bridge program in BC. I am asked this frequently, and if there is a BC program, that would be good to know.
    thanks in advance.

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