I love nursing in Canada because... - page 2

by bizzymum919

I am starting this thread because I would like feedback on the positives about nursing in Canada. I hear so much about people moving to the US and I would love to hear from those who are staying, living and nursing in Canada. ... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Zari.SVN
    Here an LVN goes to school for 1 year. We alos have a position called CNA, they go less time than that. A LVN can go back to school one more year to get his/her RN. I have heard that in Canada you are required more school for equivalent positions, I just did not know how much truth there was to it . At any rate an LVN's starting wages can be 15.00-17.00 USD per hour. How is the salary there do you know ? Also what is Canada's warmest province ?
    If you are not already an RN you need to get your BScN which takes 4 years. I think even if you are an RPN you still have to take the 4 year course. I am not 100% sure about my last statement but I mention it because in my first year class there are RPN's starting right at the bottom with the rest of us.

    Canada's warmest province is Florida, after that it is southwestern BC right on the coast. I have read that places on Vancouver Island are the sunniest in Canada. But in the summer it is probably not the hottest, the weather there is moderated by the Pacific.

    I cannot quote salaries since I am just a student in first year, bit I think they may be comprable to the USA if cost of living is factored in, unless you live in southern Ont.
  2. 0
    Reg. PN only exists in Ontario, in Western Canada RPN is a Reg. Psych Nurse (a RN who works in Mental Health settings).

    Vancouver Island is rainy. Trust me wet cold is worse than dry cold. At least on the Prairies you can keep adding layers, but once your cold and wet game over.

    Wages vary province to province. So, that one is up to the individual to decide, what's affordable and what's not. I actually found BC cheaper to live in than Alberta, due to the make up of property taxes and user fees, and utility cost were much cheaper in BC. Food is pretty much the same, just the cost of produce seems to vary greatly.

    PN to RN bridges do exist (GMCC in Alberta, Malaspina on VI) Usually you do a "bridge"/transition course and enter the second year of the four year diploma.
  3. 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    ....
    PN to RN bridges do exist (GMCC in Alberta, Malaspina on VI) Usually you do a "bridge"/transition course and enter the second year of the four year diploma.
    Could you tell me more about the Malaspina bridge program? I am working with an LPN and she is going through Athabasca because she said there wasn't a bridge program in BC. I am asked this frequently, and if there is a BC program, that would be good to know.
    thanks in advance.
  4. 0
    I believe Malaspina in Nanaimo, Kwantalen and Douglas on the Mainland all do a bridge. I met an instructor from Malaspina about a year ago and she said that they used to have a waitlist for the bridge course but at that time they no longer did. Apparently the glitch arrives when the LPN has finished the bridge and requires admission into year 2 of the BScN, sometimes there aren't enough empty spaces.

    Ask your co-worker if she is actually enrolled in Athabasca's Bridge. It requires all clinical time to be spent in AB hospitals and requires applicants to be the holders of an AB license. This has been a stumbling block in the past because at one time (it may be different now) BC LPN's had to upgrade their Anatomy and Assessment skills to work in AB. I've worked with LPN's who have moved here and said that they also had to upgrade a few skills prior to being issued a practice number.

    Sorry I don't have the website addresses, but they should be easy enough to find.
  5. 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    I believe Malaspina in Nanaimo, Kwantalen and Douglas on the Mainland all do a bridge. I met an instructor from Malaspina about a year ago and she said that they used to have a waitlist for the bridge course but at that time they no longer did. Apparently the glitch arrives when the LPN has finished the bridge and requires admission into year 2 of the BScN, sometimes there aren't enough empty spaces.

    Ask your co-worker if she is actually enrolled in Athabasca's Bridge. It requires all clinical time to be spent in AB hospitals and requires applicants to be the holders of an AB license. This has been a stumbling block in the past because at one time (it may be different now) BC LPN's had to upgrade their Anatomy and Assessment skills to work in AB. I've worked with LPN's who have moved here and said that they also had to upgrade a few skills prior to being issued a practice number.

    Sorry I don't have the website addresses, but they should be easy enough to find.
    Thanks for the info, I will check!
  6. 0
    Quote from fergus51
    Money is not an issue for our patients, ever. I never feel pressured to deliver the cheapest care possible.
    Fergus, I've had the exact opposite experience between the US and Canada. In Canada we had a certain amount of money for the floor, and had to care for whoever came in over the year. I know that anytime we came within 10% of our budget they reassigned the money so we would get less, so it was really a losing battle.

    In the US we get paid per patient, and per procedure in some cases. So although we still have budget woes each patient that has a need for a moniter, or central line, or isolation gets it, where I can think of specific situations in Canada where patients did without because we didn't have what we needed to treat them.
  7. 0
    Quote from canoehead
    Fergus, I've had the exact opposite experience between the US and Canada. In Canada we had a certain amount of money for the floor, and had to care for whoever came in over the year. I know that anytime we came within 10% of our budget they reassigned the money so we would get less, so it was really a losing battle.

    In the US we get paid per patient, and per procedure in some cases. So although we still have budget woes each patient that has a need for a moniter, or central line, or isolation gets it, where I can think of specific situations in Canada where patients did without because we didn't have what we needed to treat them.

    Maybe because we worked at opposite ends of the countries in different specialty areas? I dunno. I've seen first hand here how rich families are treated differently than poor families. It frustrates me to no end.
  8. 0
    We were at opposite ends- you in BC and me in NS!

    Right now I work in a public hospital in a poor part of the USA. I understand that in private hospitals there are big differences in treatment depending on your insurance.
  9. 0
    Quote from canoehead
    We were at opposite ends- you in BC and me in NS!

    Right now I work in a public hospital in a poor part of the USA. I understand that in private hospitals there are big differences in treatment depending on your insurance.
    I'm in a public hospital too. The difference is so obvious to many of us at work. 2 babies who are almost identical health wise will get different treatment based on who their parents are (are they poor with DCFS involved or rich with a lawyer on speed dial?). I'm getting tired of it and planning on moving on.

    I don't think I could take the difference in a private hospital. My friend recently went to a place that doesn't even accept medicaid patients...
  10. 0
    I work in a pediatric intensive care unit in a major Canadian city. We do some 700 cardiac surgeries, at least a dozen heart transplants (in 2005 it was 15), another dozen or more liver transplants, two dozen renal transplants and care for an average of fifteen extracorporeal life supported patients a year, in addition to the "usual" PICU illnesses. I can say with all honesty that all our patients receive whatever care they need, no matter what socioeconomic group they belong to. We see patients from virtually every province in Canada and from a number of other countries as well. There is never a consideration of who will be paying the freight. Our outcomes are among the best in North America.

    As an aside to Fergus... this has been the warmest winter on record for much of Canada. Even Winterpeg is losing its cachet as a cold weather city. They aren't going to be able to run many of the events usually associated with Festival du Voyageur because the ice on the river is too thin, and there isn't any snow for the sculptures! My daughter tells me she has only had to plug in her car once. When I look out my window, I see grass in my yard. Not what I expect in northern Alberta in mid-January! I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop...


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