Which is best province among the four? - page 3

by nursemich 11,464 Views | 49 Comments

To all Canadians, I want to ask if which is the best province among the four: Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nova Scotia or Prince Edward Island. Me and my fiance' is planning to migrate in Canada. I will be applying under Skilled... Read More


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    ohhhhh that didn't sound good. Thank you for being honest. My application package for Ontario just arrived and now I'm having a hard time deciding where to apply.. But I'm leaning more in Saskatchewan even though Ontario is much greater place than Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan welcomes IEN than Ontario I presume. :uhoh21:
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    Just remember that the column was meant to be humorous.

    There have been nursing lay offs in Ontario. And there are many people who wouldn't agree that Ontario is a great place... like me!
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    oH can you share some of the reasons why?
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    There's an attitude of superiority in a lot of people from Ontario that really doesn't sit well with me. Torontonians believe they ARE Canada, that the rest of us are just here to look up to them. Some of them get quite snarky when we don't. Take a look at the National Post to see just how Ontario-centric our "national" newspaper is. It's a lens on how what happens day to day affects urban Ontario. (There are huge areas of the province that are just as insignificant to the urban elite as the Rest of Canada.) Oh, and let's bail out their major industries to the tune of many billions of (western) tax dollars so that we can keep them in business.

    The cost of living in Ontario is quite high when compared to other provinces. The air quality is much poorer due to the concentration of heavy industry there. Urban sprawl is not something I approve of, and when it takes the better part of a day to drive through Toronto on the 401 because of traffic, well, not interested!

    I lived in Ottawa for two years and couldn't wait to leave. The cost of living was way too steep for our young family and I had a terrible time finding work (wasn't a nurse then). I ended up staying at home with my baby and feeling cut off from the world. People were not friendly and I wasn't used to being so isolated. We left there nearly 30 years ago and haven't been back to Ontario except to visit since.

    It may seem odd that someone whose ancestors were pioneers in Ontario would feel this way. (I have forebears from there who arrived from Scotland and Ireland in the very early 1800's, more during the Irish Famine of 1846-1852 and then others from Poland in the 1870's.) But I've lived allover Canada and have seen how ignored the other provinces are when it comes to just about everything.The only province that gets more attention than Ontario is Quebec, and we're just NOT going to open that can of worms. I still have many relatives in Ontario and they're welcome to it! But of course this is my personal point of view.
    Last edit by NotReady4PrimeTime on Apr 23, '09
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Im off to Ontario. I trust your point of view. Ive never been there so it will be much harder for a foreign like me. :uhoh21:
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    I can understand your point of view janfrn:

    I have been to a lot of major cities in the States and ended up choosing to go to Oklahoma (yes where the cowboys are) to study and live. Go figure. I love peace and quite. I love the strength a small town brings to the pot of stew, although its strength and existence is usually underminded/overlooked. That's why I chose London, I never heard of it before I applied to be assessed by CNO last year, then again I didn't know much about Canada, period. When I did, I started making plans around it (London, i.e.). I think it's about 2 & a 1/2 hrs outside of Toronto?! Toronto wasn't even an option for me. I smiled when you mentioned the traffic on the highway, I actually experienced that.

    I love fresh air, country air...crisp and void of the hovering cloud of dust and pollution usually present in major cities. Maybe London isn't as "country"...I guess in time I'll find my way around.
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    Clay07, London is a very nice small city. My son was a patient at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario for five months 20 years ago and that was my introduction to London. (One of my dearest friends now was one of my son's nurses then. She lives out here near us now.) London has much more of a small-town atmosphere than many other Ontario cities and it's close to cottage country so there's lots of fresh air! The Big Smoke and Detroit are far enough away that you can almost ignore them.

    I actually was born in Ontario, in my dad's hometown. We lived there and in a couple of other Ontario communities when I was a kid. Most of my memories are pretty vague, pretty much of walking to the corner store in the summer with a wagon full of bottles to trade for penny candy. But I still won't be moving back there anytime soon.
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    Ok, I am from Prince Albert Saskatchewan, but now a RN student in the USA (graduate in 10 days!, he haww!) Not all of Saskatchewan is TREELESS ,lol Northern Saskatchewan has many trees and lakes. And yes it can get very cold and of course there is snow! People are super freindly,especially in the small communities! You wil lbe driving along, and people will wave to you, even though you have no clue who they are,lol! Same goes for smal town in Manitoba! Some of the friendliest people you wil meet are in small towns! I spent 15 yrs in the Canadian Armed Forces,lived in Victoria BC (very Nice), lots of tiem in halifax, was ok! East coasters are great people as well! Really everyone is ok,lol but it comes down to the lifestyle you want to live! Big cities probably have more to offer, but its rush rush. You goto a small rural community, it is much more relaxed, but maybe you only have a few small stores and a coffee shop, it could be very boring if you are not used to that. I have been to Manilla 3 times with the navy, very beautiful city. I myself would try to stay to some of the smaller cities in any province, I hate big cities, yet I live close to Washington DC,lol Saskatoon Sask. is very nice and th eprovince of Sask seems to be doing very well at this time. Ontario has the Maple leaf hockey team, and they are terrible do you really want to live in a province with such a terrible hockey team! No, you don't!! Sask does not have a hockey team, so you can pick a great team like Calgary to cheer for, it is a win win situation! Go flames go!
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    Quote from janfrn
    Clay07, London is a very nice small city. My son was a patient at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario for five months 20 years ago and that was my introduction to London. (One of my dearest friends now was one of my son's nurses then. She lives out here near us now.) London has much more of a small-town atmosphere than many other Ontario cities and it's close to cottage country so there's lots of fresh air! The Big Smoke and Detroit are far enough away that you can almost ignore them.

    I actually was born in Ontario, in my dad's hometown. We lived there and in a couple of other Ontario communities when I was a kid. Most of my memories are pretty vague, pretty much of walking to the corner store in the summer with a wagon full of bottles to trade for penny candy. But I still won't be moving back there anytime soon.
    "...walking to the corner store with a wagon full of bottles to trade for penny candy."
    Was about to pull my legs up and read some more. Sounds like good read. Oh well...maybe later you'll sit back and write some more.

    But London sounds good, at least you made it sound that way. I barely had a chance to enjoy it as I only spent about 2 hours there for the interview at LHSC. I liked it. Intimate setting.

    Look forward to reading more (if you care to share).

    Thanks for sharing.
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    It's only just occurred to me that all of the memories I have of those childhood days in Ontario are all from summers! The 16 months that we lived in my dad's home town seem to have been all summer. I was 7 when we moved back there and for awhile we lived in a third-floor walk-up over a shoe store on the main street. My dad delivered milk for the local dairy, which was only a couple of blocks' walk, down by the boat launch. Mom used to take us down to the dock to swim. (She didn't learn to swim herself until a few years after that.) We'd walk out into the water next to the dock until we got up to our armpits and then we'd paddle around. One time I was sitting on the dock and saw my brother's hair drifting along just in front of me. Without even thinking about it I realized he was going to drown so I reached down and grabbed the fronds as he floated by. I pulled him up onto the dock next to me and saved his life (I think he owes me.) The next summer when I was 8, I convinced our young teenage babysitter that we should go down to the dock for a quick swim; we were caught in a really severe thunderstorm. My mother had come home while we were gone and was absolutely frantic! I was in deep sheep dip for a long time after that escapade.

    The dairy sold the very best ice cream I have ever eaten. Sometimes on a Sunday we'd go down there and get cones for a treat. There was one of those old-fashioned pop machines where the bottles were kept cold in a chest full of cold water. To get the bottles out you lifted the neck into a track then dragged it through the slot all the way to a little shelf that had a leaf-spring sort of mechanism. When you put the money in, the spring would release and you could pull the bottle up and out. I loved to buy pop, although I never enjoyed drinking it (and still don't).

    While we lived over the shoe store Mom did all our laundry at the laundromat. There were 5 of us altogether and there was always quite a lot. My dad borrowed my uncle's Volkswagen Beetle to transport the clothes and my mom would wait until he got back then walk over and do the washing. One rainy summer day we all went to the laundromat as a rare treat. Dad and the laundry went in the car and the rest of us walked. While we were playing tag around the folding tables, I started to get a headache. It quickly became almost unbearable. Dad took me out and made me crawl into the backseat of the Beetle. I must have slept for several hours because I can't remember going home. I do remember waking up the next day covered in chicken pox and being itchier than I knew was possible.

    There are so many memories that are coming back to me now. Not all of them are good, and some are of bad things I did. My grandmother's house, a turn-of-the-century two-story duplex with a lovely veranda, is long gone, and so is she. The house was quite interesting. There was no sink in the bathroom but there was an old cast iron claw tub. She had a porch off the back of the house that she called the back kitchen - it was really more of a storage room where her wringer washer lived. The largest of the bedrooms was upstairs at the back of the house and you had to go down two steps to get into it. The ceiling was quite low and sloped on both sides. There was a very old garage full of mysterious things that we never got to see, and the basement had a dirt floor. The neighbours were two middle aged sisters who didn't work, always smelled like rye and frequently entertained gentlemen callers... See, my memory is just cranking them out now!

    Sorry to all those posters who have found this incredibly self-indulgent and boring. We'll now return you to your regularly-scheduled thread...


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