What Is Your Most Gross, Yucky, Disgusting Nursing Horror Story? - page 48

:D Here is my most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing story! I was working a night shift on a tele floor as a new Nurse. We had this one poor old lady who was confused and was restrained as... Read More

  1. by   Kitkat23
    :uhoh21: Whoa, that is scary! There are dirty old men everywhere and I've had my boobs and butt grabbed by other men as a student aide in a nursing home. But my freakiest moment was when I saw an old guy jerking off. I guess they're human too and still can get hard ons like the younger guys. But it was still freaky. :stone
  2. by   Kitkat23
    : I have another gross story to tell. It was my second day in clinical as a student CNA. My two partners and I were instructed to change and turn a heavy resident who weighed 500 pounds.She was bedridden and a 3 person assist. But my partners and I needed an experienced aide to help us. So we gathered our stuff and went into her room. It strongly smelled of feces so my two partners and the aide turned her while I was stuck wiping her huge butt and crotch full of poop. I swear it was like cleaning up elephant poop. Her depends was huge too and I had to put one on her. It took about 6 washclothes to get her cleaned up and then turned her to the other side.. I almost gagged at the strong smell of feces, but I got used to it later on. I knew that being a CNA is a dirty job and that someone had to do it. I guess I never expected a HUGE resident. I felt bad for her. She was too heavy for a Hoyer, so she was stuck in bed all the time.

    Then there was one time I had a patient who had a bout of diarrhea 4 times and I had to clean her and do 2 total beds on her. Her butt, crotch, thighs, and back was totally covered in feces. I almost wanted to take her to the shower room to hose her down. I finally got her cleaned up and one of the *****y aides yelled at me for taking too long on my rounds and that she always leaves patients who are incontinent again for the next round. That's nasty and that's a great way to get pressure sores. I felt bad for the resident. I got the nurse and she gave her pepto and gingerale. :stone
  3. by   FranEMTnurse
    Quote from Kitkat23
    Then there was one time I had a patient who had a bout of diarrhea 4 times and I had to clean her and do 2 total beds on her. Her butt, crotch, thighs, and back was totally covered in feces. I almost wanted to take her to the shower room to hose her down. I finally got her cleaned up and one of the *****y aides yelled at me for taking too long on my rounds and that she always leaves patients who are incontinent again for the next round. That's nasty and that's a great way to get pressure sores. I felt bad for the resident. I got the nurse and she gave her pepto and gingerale. :stone
    i had one like that when I was in nursing school. She messed her diaper every hour, so we finally tested her for c-diff. It came up positive.
  4. by   TweetiePieRN
    About a month ago, a patient was admitted to our floor from ER. She was in her late 80s and was a comfort care pt (palliative care). She reeked of horrendous BM as she was wheeled by the nursing station. She literally died about 5 minutes after being gurneyed into her room and transferred into bed. The CNA's were in her room trying to clean her up, so her family could see her before she was transported to the morgue.

    I was called into the room by the CNAs because....when they turned the pt onto her side a fountain of brown liquid was FLOWING out of her anus with tremendous force!! We were able to clean her up down there, but when it was all said and done, she probably expelled 2 liters of fluid easily. When she stopped flowing, we turned her onto her back and then she started flowing this black green stuff from her mouth, nose, and even her tear ducts!! It took an hour to clean her up!! When she got to our floor her abdomen was soooo distended....now we know why.

    This memory haunts me still!!
  5. by   NoCrumping
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    i had one like that when I was in nursing school. She messed her diaper every hour, so we finally tested her for c-diff. It came up positive.
    I was new CNA, I had this assignment from hell, 60 patients , all on a skilled floor in a NH. But thats beside the point,. (shudder). Anyway, I had this lady with dementia, she had MRSA, HEP C, recently had a stroke,tube fed WITH JEVITY W/ FIBER, TB,on a clinitron bed, on full isolation ,and the worst of all, in my book, was, SHE HAD C DIFF. I had to fully gown up, mask, the whole thing. I went in there, the room had to be at least 95 degrees w/ the heat, plus the clinitron bed throws off heat. Well, I opened the door and before I could see the diarrhea running over the bed, and up to her neck, THE SMELL HIT ME. Mind you, this is one of my first experiences with this 'caring for people" thing.... well, I go about my business, cleaning her, the best as I could, thinking I would get used to the smell I DIDNT EVEN ASK FOR HELP, BECAUSE THERE WAS NOBODY TO HELP ME. Well, I didn't get used to the smell. I VOMITED IN MY MASK. I was relieved, THE SMELL OF MY VOMIT WAS BETTER THAN THE SMELL OF THE BM. I CONTEMPLATED LEAVING THAT MASK ON , keeping my face in the pool of vomit that the mask contained, because I knew I would have to just change up again, thus smelling the BM again!!!!! I cant begin to describe that smell. Now, I know somebody has to care for these people. Do I realize I am not one of them? Absolutely. I quit that job the next day, applied to nursing school, went the the NICU, never even GLANCED BACK. GOD BLESS ALL OF YOU WHO CAN DEAL WITH THESE KIND OF THINGS, ALL KIDDING AND HUMOR ASIDE.
  6. by   Kitkat23
    [QUOTE=TweetiePieRN]About a month ago, a patient was admitted to our floor from ER. She was in her late 80s and was a comfort care pt (palliative care). She reeked of horrendous BM as she was wheeled by the nursing station. She literally died about 5 minutes after being gurneyed into her room and transferred into bed. The CNA's were in her room trying to clean her up, so her family could see her before she was transported to the morgue.

    I was called into the room by the CNAs because....when they turned the pt onto her side a fountain of brown liquid was FLOWING out of her anus with tremendous force!! We were able to clean her up down there, but when it was all said and done, she probably expelled 2 liters of fluid easily. When she stopped flowing, we turned her onto her back and then she started flowing this black green stuff from her mouth, nose, and even her tear ducts!! It took an hour to clean her up!! When she got to our floor her abdomen was soooo distended....now we know why.


    :uhoh21: :uhoh21: Ohmigod! That's gross. I did hear that dead people can still pee and poop and have stuff come out of their mouths. That happened to my grandpa when he was put in his coffin and he needed a new one. (It was covered in BM.) Boy, I feel bad for the aides who had a major cleanup to do. Poor lady. Being a CNA has its not so dull moments though. :Melody:
  7. by   FranEMTnurse
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    About a month ago, a patient was admitted to our floor from ER. She was in her late 80s and was a comfort care pt (palliative care). She reeked of horrendous BM as she was wheeled by the nursing station. She literally died about 5 minutes after being gurneyed into her room and transferred into bed. The CNA's were in her room trying to clean her up, so her family could see her before she was transported to the morgue.

    I was called into the room by the CNAs because....when they turned the pt onto her side a fountain of brown liquid was FLOWING out of her anus with tremendous force!! We were able to clean her up down there, but when it was all said and done, she probably expelled 2 liters of fluid easily. When she stopped flowing, we turned her onto her back and then she started flowing this black green stuff from her mouth, nose, and even her tear ducts!! It took an hour to clean her up!! When she got to our floor her abdomen was soooo distended....now we know why.

    This memory haunts me still!!
    That's terrible.:stone
  8. by   Kitkat23
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    i had one like that when I was in nursing school. She messed her diaper every hour, so we finally tested her for c-diff. It came up positive.
    What's C-diff? I just wanted to know.
  9. by   stevierae
    Quote from Kitkat23
    :uhoh21: Whoa, that is scary! There are dirty old men everywhere and I've had my boobs and butt grabbed by other men as a student aide in a nursing home. But my freakiest moment was when I saw an old guy jerking off. I guess they're human too and still can get hard ons like the younger guys. But it was still freaky. :stone
    Man-----I gotta commend you guys. Working in the operating room, any story I could tell would seem very, very tame in comparison. I HAVE seen old guys try to grab nurses' butts, even reaching their arms off the armboards while they are being pre-oxygenated, to grab at the nurse who is standing by the right side of the bed to assist with induction. These days we tend to slip very soft, gentle restraints on their wrists while they are stilll awake to prevent the arms flopping off the armboards during (eventual) fasciculation, so you don't see that as much anymore.

    But one time when I was a 20 something nurse, I was prepping this old guy's entire arm, circumferentially, for some sort of arm surgery. He was under axillary block, so I had control of his arm, and he was wide awake, just gettign O2 via nasal prongs. As I sort of leaned in toward him to prep high up near the tourniquet, he suddenly lunged what he could of his head and upper body in toward where I was bent over and attempted to BITE my nipple! Then he LAUGHED like crazy. He was soon put off to sleep---we were all flabbergasted. We--the entire surgical team---were literally open-mouthed, standing there in shock---we couldn't absorb what had nearly just happened, and it wasn't like this guy was demented or senile. Come to think of it, I thought at the time that he was "old--" but he was probably in his early 50s. (Since I just turned 51, "early 50s" seems young enough, but then it seemed ANCIENT.)

    I imagine the nurses who work in V.A. Hospitals sure have a wealth of "dirty old men" stories to tell. I remember in the '60s when my uncle was in a V.A. hospital after a pneumonectomy. He was recovering well, and I think he was on med-surg already, but confined to bedrest, as people often were in those days. I don't think he had a Foley, still---here's why. My mom came home and told this story about my slightly eccentric aunt (his wife, and her sister.) She (his wife) had crocheted him various shawls and blankets--but she didn't stop there. She also crocheted him a colorful "weenie warmer" (I kid you not) to keep his, uh, penis warm and modestly covered.

    If that was not bad enough, she crocheted enough---in various colors---for all the men on the floor, plus extras, and helpfully gave them to the nurses for distribution. In fact, there were enough extras (probably ALL of them, actually!) so that the next time my mom visited, near Christmas, there were multiple multicolored "weenie warmers" hanging from the floor's Christmas tree.
    Last edit by stevierae on Feb 15, '05
  10. by   icyounurse
    i had a pt in the icu i work in who was a major pia. he was admitted for sepsis with a new nephrostomy, he had aids, a platelet count of 4, and could not get a foley. he was incredibly combative. the night i had him he spit at me, threw feces at me and would not use a bedpan or urinal. threw pills at me when i tried to give him meds, and said awful stuff everytime you walked in the room. a couple of nights after i had him[i wasn't there, just heard about it] he somehow got out of his restraints and walked naked with feces and urine on him out into the hall and pulled out his central line and blood poured out[ remember his platelets were 4]. this was during visiting hours i was told. took the whole staff to get him back into bed, he was trying to punch everyone.
    a couple of weeks later[he was on our unit awhile] he had a complete turnaround, said he was blacked out while he was acting like that and personally apologized to all staff involved. he was all "yes ma'm, no ma'am". even stuck himself on the bedpan himself."didn't want to bother anyone"
    never forget that guy.
  11. by   Cindy_A
    Quote from Kitkat23
    What's C-diff? I just wanted to know.
    It stands for clostridium difficile. It usaully happens to people who have been on a lot of antibiotics. For more info, check out this site: http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/954992292.html
  12. by   stevierae
    Quote from icyounurse
    i had a pt in the icu i work in who was a major pia. he was admitted for sepsis with a new nephrostomy, he had aids, a platelet count of 4, and could not get a foley. he was incredibly combative. the night i had him he spit at me, threw feces at me and would not use a bedpan or urinal. threw pills at me when i tried to give him meds, and said awful stuff everytime you walked in the room. a couple of nights after i had him[i wasn't there, just heard about it] he somehow got out of his restraints and walked naked with feces and urine on him out into the hall and pulled out his central line and blood poured out[ remember his platelets were 4]. this was during visiting hours i was told. took the whole staff to get him back into bed, he was trying to punch everyone.
    a couple of weeks later[he was on our unit awhile] he had a complete turnaround, said he was blacked out while he was acting like that and personally apologized to all staff involved. he was all "yes ma'm, no ma'am". even stuck himself on the bedpan himself."didn't want to bother anyone"
    never forget that guy.
    Oh----how sad. I seem to remember that advanced AIDS patients can suffer from organic dementia, just as cancer patients with brain mets can (or, of course, Alzheimer's patients.) He probably had absolutely no control over his behavior---interesting that he remembered it.

    I was curious about this, so I googled "AIDS" & "psychosis" together and came up with this:

    "Dementia is a known complication of HIV infection. It tends to occur late in the course of HIV infection, and is usually associated with high viral loads and low CD4 counts seen in people who are not taking HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy) or who are on a failing HAART regimen."
  13. by   icyounurse
    we thought it might be some aids related dementia, but this guy wasn't end stage. i think he had been diagnosed 6 weeks or so before all this.
    but it was very strange because he seemed genuinely horrified and mystified by his behavior, and his family said he never acted like that. i believe them, because he was a model pt after his turnaround.

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