What Is Your Most Gross, Yucky, Disgusting Nursing Horror Story? - page 104

:D Here is my most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing story! I was working a night shift on a tele floor as a new Nurse. We had this one poor old lady who was confused and was restrained as... Read More

  1. by   nitenite
    Sometimes I wonder how the poop-eaters can eat poop. It can't taste good.
  2. by   jnrsmommy
    Quote from nitenite
    Sometimes I wonder how the poop-eaters can eat poop. It can't taste good.
    Walked in on my resident completely covered in stool, all over the bed, wall, air conditioning unit (and the heat was on), and she was eating it too. While trying to clean inside her mouth (yes, she was eating it as well), she was fighting us. I told her that we had to clean her mouth because she had poop in there. Her reply? "Leave it there. That's the best stuff I've had in a long time."
  3. by   nitenite
    Quote from jnrsmommy
    Walked in on my resident completely covered in stool, all over the bed, wall, air conditioning unit (and the heat was on), and she was eating it too. While trying to clean inside her mouth (yes, she was eating it as well), she was fighting us. I told her that we had to clean her mouth because she had poop in there. Her reply? "Leave it there. That's the best stuff I've had in a long time."
    It's such a shame how the brain can confuse the tongue. Someone said there's no dignity for people with dementia. I think they're right. Especially Alzheimer's. I had a 104 year old pt who'd had it since he was 70 and all he did was lie there. Never moaned. Never moved. He probably didn't even remember he was human anymore. I don't think he could even understand language. He looked like King Tut's mummy, skin and bones and he probably weighed 90 lbs soaking wet.

    What's worse? His family had him on treatments and full code. If he got sick, we had to give him antibiotics. We were turning him all the time and still he had a lot of decubs that needed care. His joints were stiff and nearly frozen despite physical therapy. We fed him via gastronomy tubing and gave him dialysis. He laid in that room for at least a month before he finally crashed. I got to code this poor man and when I started chest compressions, his sternum and ribs pretty much disintegrated and various nasty fluids oozed out of his orifices. Feces, vomit, snot, urine. I will never forget that smell. He didn't survive the code, mercifully.

    Should I also mention this poor guy died on CHRISTMAS DAY? We couldn't get ahold of the family and they arrived all dressed up with gifts for him, and they were screaming in the hallway when the doctor delivered the news. They never got to say goodbye to this poor man because they were always hoping he'd snap out of it, and now they have to suffer with losing him on a holiday. How sad. I'd hate to see their bills after all this.
  4. by   PolaBar
    Quote from nitenite
    It's such a shame how the brain can confuse the tongue. Someone said there's no dignity for people with dementia. I think they're right. Especially Alzheimer's. I had a 104 year old pt who'd had it since he was 70 and all he did was lie there. Never moaned. Never moved. He probably didn't even remember he was human anymore. I don't think he could even understand language. He looked like King Tut's mummy, skin and bones and he probably weighed 90 lbs soaking wet.

    What's worse? His family had him on treatments and full code. If he got sick, we had to give him antibiotics. We were turning him all the time and still he had a lot of decubs that needed care. His joints were stiff and nearly frozen despite physical therapy. We fed him via gastronomy tubing and gave him dialysis. He laid in that room for at least a month before he finally crashed. I got to code this poor man and when I started chest compressions, his sternum and ribs pretty much disintegrated and various nasty fluids oozed out of his orifices. Feces, vomit, snot, urine. I will never forget that smell. He didn't survive the code, mercifully.

    Should I also mention this poor guy died on CHRISTMAS DAY? We couldn't get ahold of the family and they arrived all dressed up with gifts for him, and they were screaming in the hallway when the doctor delivered the news. They never got to say goodbye to this poor man because they were always hoping he'd snap out of it, and now they have to suffer with losing him on a holiday. How sad. I'd hate to see their bills after all this.
    Alzheimer's is probably the only reason I decided to pursue nurising (I start school in 13 weeks!). My grandmother had alzheimer's. It was hard to watch her completely loser herself. Finally, she didn't get out of bed to eat/drink. She was at my mom's house in Arizona (I live in PA). She called to let us know she was probably going to die. My aunt and I flew out to be at her side for her last days. Her breathing was raspy. She hadn't eaten or drank for a few days before we arrived (as were her wishes). Hospice nurses came to help us take care of her other needs like turning and oral care (she was nonverbal or communicative for the days I was there). The only thing she did (and only occasionally) was open her eyes very WIDE, sit up with her mouth gaped. But, she didn't even seem to acknowledge the people in the room. I found the hospice care so important for how our family dealt (emotionally) with her last days, that a few months later, I looked into taking on nursing. I feel that we gave my grandmother the most dignity we could by follwoing through on her desires to not be hospitalized or intubated for nourishment. She died at home with her closest family members by her side. I think she would have been satisfied had she known. She died a few weeks before Christmas and after her birthday.

    I think having to do 'full codes' on people that are at the end of their lives seems like a horrible situation for everyone involved. The thought (and reality) of it scares me to death. Would I be able to refuse care on moral (I first wrote mortal) issues as others can refuse to prescribe/administer birth control?
  5. by   thegreenmile
    Sorry guys, these stories cant hold a candle to the $&*+ I see on the inpatient psych ward, some I cant bear to repeat. But this, while working outpt program is probably the funniest now that I look back on it.
    ACT (Assertive Community Treatment) Program patient, goes to local pharmacy, across the street from my office building, carrying a brown paper bag with some reddish brown substance shadowing through, she approaches the counter, tells the pharmacist, "I need to make a deposit", confused and bewildered, he replies "this is the pharmacy, the bank is next door". She seriously states "No, you dont understand, the Lithium secreted in my menstral cycle needs to be deposited so I can get a refill".
    Last edit by ElvishDNP on Jan 2, '09 : Reason: TOS
  6. by   BigBee48
    I worked at a SNF, a long time ago, before we even had units for alzheimers. We had the half doors, where you
    can shut and lock the bottom half, so they could look out and see what was going on. We delivered her food tray, when I went to pick it up, it had several big tirds on it. She did this often, and when we tried to bath her, it was always on her hands, and under her nails. She also ate it many times. And then yrs later when I worked in an alzheimers unit, we had a gentleman who had a penile implant. We were always finding other women in his bed. One time a women, who was in his bed, her husband came to visit, and found her in his bed,oops. Actually we had this happen several timesHe was a very nice man, not even a prevert when we showered him. Go figure. I'm also remembering working in the SNF, many yrs ago, we had young people, the were MR (at that time they were not dx very good) they would always put their hand up to the wrist in their mouth and suck on it, so needless to say the smell and slimmyness of their hand was almost more than I could bare, we used a type of hand restraint (but they managed to get it to their mouth anyway). I became an ICU nurse, and worked in LTAC, so suctioning trachs, mouths and so on is not a problem, but the hand thing was unreal Any way I have forgotten more stories than I can remember.
  7. by   talaxandra
    Quote from nitenite
    What's worse? His family had him on treatments and full code. If he got sick, we had to give him antibiotics... They never got to say goodbye to this poor man because they were always hoping he'd snap out of it, and now they have to suffer with losing him on a holiday. How sad.
    I think that's one of the worst horror stories on this thread
  8. by   morte
    Quote from talaxandra
    I think that's one of the worst horror stories on this thread
    frankly, i think they got what they deserved.....
  9. by   talaxandra
    Oh, I wasn't thinking of the idiot family - I was thinking of the poor, tortured patient kept alive for over 30 years because his family thought he'd "snap out of" Alzheimer's.
  10. by   Hygiene Queen
    Quote from talaxandra
    Oh, I wasn't thinking of the idiot family - I was thinking of the poor, tortured patient kept alive for over 30 years because his family thought he'd "snap out of" Alzheimer's.
    ... and that ticks me off to no end.
    Gosh darnit, you'd think people would say to themselves, "Hmmmmm... Dad's got Alzheimer's. I guess I better learn something about that... gee! Look what I found out! It says here it's a degenerative disease that WILL NEVER BE CURED!!!! Gosh..."
    But do they do this? Nope. Just keep up the denial.
    And the patient ends up suffering worse because of that denial. That story was a perfect example.

    Now, that said... the grossest think I have seen lately? A patient licking all the styrofoam cups by the coffee pot and them stacking them back up like new.
    Fortunately, I saw that and could throw those cups out before someone grabbed a "clean" cup... but I only saw that at that time... who knows how often he had done that with no one looking!?
    BLECH!
  11. by   island40
    I'm laughing so hard I might pee my pants!!!!
  12. by   island40
    I've been nursing for 16 years so I have the usual poop, pee and assortied liquid stories but the funnies thing happened when I was a patient. I had my ileostomy converted to a kpouch at cleveland clinic and got an ileus. About 5 days post-op I and still on liquid only diet I told the nurses I was nausiated. I only had that little bean shaped basin and put my call light on for something more usefull. No answer and when I started to projetile vomit green liquid over the foot of the bed my room mate started yelling "nurse, nurse!" The nice young lady who rushed into the room came to a stop at the end of my bed- and you guessed it- got splatted with about 500ml of green liquid spewing from my mouth. Sorry....but I told you I was nausious.
  13. by   nitenite
    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEW! Puke is one of my Kryptonites.

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