Nursing School Bloopers - page 3

Anyone have any funny nursing school stories from their past? I had to change an IV bag and went in with my instructor to do so. My instructor always made me nervous but I was determined to... Read More

  1. by   malenurse1
    Quote from perksrn
    This week in gerneral has been a blooper. I opened my mouth about all of the procedures I had not done and wanted to do before graduation...I think I got to do them all....Today, I planned, would be error proof. I was in my patient's room giving her meds via NG when my instructor walks in and says, "You did give the Dilantin p.o, right?" I just stared blankly at the tube watching the Dilantin go down...She got the clue and suctioned it out, clamped the tube and took me to the hallway. I could have cried. I had looked at the dosages and meds carefully, but ASSUMED they were all via NG. Dilantin was a new order and was p.o. (not sure why?) Of course, never assume....NEVER. She had me redo the meds...I am sure the patient was a little confused (I did give her a brief explanation)!
    :imbar
    Now I'm confused...doesn't giving the med via NG tube achieve the same effect as giving it PO? The alternitive is the same; IV, IM, transdermal, or PR (a suppos). I can think of no reason to give the pill PO verses NG. Anyone out there that can help clear this up?!
  2. by   TDub
    Unless the NG is connected to sxn....



    I don't know--I'm a nursing instructor and if I saw "give po" on someone with an NG tube, I'd assume we gave it via NG. That's how he gets the rest of his food/meds, right?
  3. by   ClimbingNurse
    Quote from malenurse1
    Now I'm confused...doesn't giving the med via NG tube achieve the same effect as giving it PO? The alternitive is the same; IV, IM, transdermal, or PR (a suppos). I can think of no reason to give the pill PO verses NG. Anyone out there that can help clear this up?!
    To give meds via NG you must crush them (or empty the capsule). Dilantin is available as a sustained release capsule. It is my understanding (though I have actually not yet passed meds) that you should NEVER crush a sustained release medication. Doing so can cause the whole drug to act at once instead of slowly over time. So, if it was a sustained release capsule, then that would be why it was ordered PO.

    Right?
  4. by   camay1221_RN
    I was taking care of an elderly gentleman during my last semester of nursing school who had c-diff. He told me he had to go to the bathroom, and since I wanted to change the pad on his bed while he was on the toilet, I asked, "Could you hold on just a sec?" The linen cart was right outside of his room. I'll bet you know where this is going, huh?!? Well, as it happened, he couldn't wait a sec, and not only did I have to just change his chux pad, I had to change everything on the bed! Even more stupid of me, was, I was six months pregnant! I was terribly embarrassed and I felt awful because I wasn't thinking of his needs when I asked him to wait. :imbar I felt even worse because he was embarrassed because he lost control of his bowels!

    It was a learning experience! So, needless to say, from that point on, whenever someone said, "I have to go now..." I took them NOW!!
  5. by   |nexus|
    As a teenager, I used to be a volunteer in LTC at the hospital in my neigborhood. I asked the nurses if I could take one of the full care patients outside for a stroll in her wheelchair. They said yes, I put her in her wheelchair and away we went.

    So we were outside and as we are strolling along I notice the patient sinking in her wheelchair - rapidly. (She had no control over her body) I realized that I had forgotten to put the seatbelt on her before we left, but it was too late. I put the breaks on the wheel chair (thank goodness I remembered that much) and whipped around to grab on to her legs and try to push her up. By this time her bum was no longer in the chair. I had stopped her from slipping, but I didn't have the strength to get her back in her chair (she was about 200lbs), so were stuck! I thought I would be the only person in history to get fired from a volunteer job!

    Luckily a friendly stranger came along and helped me get her back in the chair. We went back inside like nothing happened. But now it's been more than a decade later and I've been in nursing school for three years, but every time I put a patient in a wheelchair, I remember that day and always buckle up!
  6. by   Kingbandit
    Our instructor had us team up for the day so:

    1st my partner draws up all 19 med including several narcs for G-tude
    she bumped into my back and spilled them down me

    Next during the childs bath I dislodged the G-tube

    And finally I pulled the Trach out

    The child smiled at everyone exept me
    I wander Why

    I thought I was going to be kicked out of school or at least the facility
    Niether I graduate in June Yahoo!!!!!!!!
  7. by   TweetiePieRN
    My nursing student buddy asked me to help her pull her pt up in bed. The pt was really groggy and was asking why were we pulling him up in bed. I told him "So your feet don't get caught down here at the bottom." We pulled him up, got him all comfortable, and it was then when I realized he was a double above the knee amputee!!!
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    When I was a nursing student, more than a quarter of a century ago, the hospital in which I was doing my clinical had just gotten new beds. Since most of the beds on the floor on which we were doing our clinical rotation were the old fashioned crank beds, we students were all quite impressed with the brand new electric beds with IV poles attached. (I'm sure you can see where this is going.) I was raising the bed to see how high it would go, and it was still going up-up-up when the flourescent light above us exploded, raining glass down over three nursing students and the brand new bed. My nursing instructor walked in just in time to see the IV pole going through the light fixture . . .

    Yes, I passed that clinical!
  9. by   TDub
    This is more of a nursing instructor blooper:

    I was checking charting when I see the student has charted "Neg Homan's x 1" I read her the riot act about "A pt's got two legs, it should be neg x 2, You have to chart completely, don't ever assume, blah, blah, blah..."

    After I'm done tearing this girl a new one, she meekly says, "The patient only has one leg."


    So--I ate some major crow and apologized.
  10. by   Audreyfay
    My first IM injection to a patient was for an elderly confused gentleman. As I stood behind him, he lied on his side, with my classmate holding him in place. As I mentally made the "X" on his buttocks, I held the skin taught and went for the poke. My classmate wasn't really holding him. He moved and the injection needle went right through my thumb, barely scratching the patient's skin on the other side of my thumb. In my defense, I didn't even feel it! Had to throw out the penicillin shot. At least it was penicillin though!
  11. by   KibbsRNstudent
    Quote from mcmike55
    Second story, one of my class mates, I believe. The order read, take out of of the skin staples out. She did. The top half!! After returning the pt from surgery for a dehis. it was explained to her.
    Mike
    I am sorry but I have to ask what was wrong with this? I start cliniclas in the fall and I would have done the same thing. I do not want to make a worng mistake if I can help it so please tell me why if the orders said to take the staples out and she did then why was it wrong? Is there a rule that says only take staples out of a certain part of the body or something?. Eek.
  12. by   malenurse1
    Quote from KibbsRNstudent
    I am sorry but I have to ask what was wrong with this? I start cliniclas in the fall and I would have done the same thing. I do not want to make a worng mistake if I can help it so please tell me why if the orders said to take the staples out and she did then why was it wrong? Is there a rule that says only take staples out of a certain part of the body or something?. Eek.
    You take out every other staple just in case the incision dehis's (reopens). It apparently did in mcmike55's post as he mentioned goig back to surgery.
  13. by   FROGGYLEGS
    When we had first started clinicals we were assingned to do total care for one or two patients each. Nothing too in depth; just ADL type things. A good friend of mine had this confused elderly lady. The lady's speech was mostly gibberish and the continuous repetition of short phrases. My friend brushed the lady's teeth and got her up and dressed. Then the lady kept repeating "mowf ith thicky, mowf ith thicky" and seemed to be getting rather agitated. She had tried to console the woman, but she got only more agitated. It took a little while to figure out that the woman's "mouth was sticky" because my friend had brushed her teeth with a generic tube of denture adhesive. We got her mouth cleaned up and all was well with the patient. My poor friend had still not lived that one down by the time we graduated.

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