A Koala Goes Into a Restaurant...

  1. A koala goes into a restaurant, asks for dinner, and eats it. Then he pulls
    out a gun and shoots the waiter. As he is waddling out the door, the
    manager runs over and yells, "Wait, what is going on here?" The koala
    replies: "I'm a koala; Look it up!" Then he goes out.

    So the manager goes over to the dictionary and looks it up and finds the
    following definition:

    Scroll down:

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    TA DUM!





    "Koala: Australian marsupial, eats shoots and leaves."
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    You did it wrong -- it's supposed to be "eats, shoots and leaves," and the point of the joke is to illustrate what a difference punctuation makes (i.e., "eats, shoots and leaves" means something entirely different than "eats shoots and leaves"). There is a British writer who has a new book out on punctuation with that title (Eats, Shoots and Leaves), only her version of the joke is about a panda.

    She "collects" sentences that can change their meaning depending on how they are punctuated -- one example:

    "Woman, without her man, is nothing." Versus:

    "Woman: Without her, man is nothing."
  4. by   nurseunderwater
    bwahhhhhhhhh! I got it anyway...thanks for the chuckle
  5. by   ExquisiteRevelation
    Heh...guess that's what I get for just copy/pasting huh? Oh well...at least you still got the point!
  6. by   jemb
    Funny!

  7. by   Cindy_A
    Hey! I understood, despite the missing comma!
    cute!
  8. by   Ned the Red
    Quote from elkpark
    You did it wrong -- it's supposed to be "eats, shoots and leaves," and the point of the joke is to illustrate what a difference punctuation makes (i.e., "eats, shoots and leaves" means something entirely different than "eats shoots and leaves"). There is a British writer who has a new book out on punctuation with that title (Eats, Shoots and Leaves), only her version of the joke is about a panda.

    She "collects" sentences that can change their meaning depending on how they are punctuated -- one example:

    "Woman, without her man, is nothing." Versus:

    "Woman: Without her, man is nothing."
    Actually, correct punctuation would dictate that it be:

    Eats, shoots, and leaves.

    But, I really like dumb jokes!!
  9. by   elkpark
    Actually, correct punctuation would dictate that it be:

    Eats, shoots, and leaves.

    But, I really like dumb jokes!!
    Use of the "serial comma" (the one between "shoots" and "and") varies -- some style manuals call for it and others don't. (I know, I know, I'm turning into the Grammar Creep -- I'll stop ...) :chuckle

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