Why are there no nursing jobs available for new grads? What is going on??

  1. 6
    I just graduated from an ASN program in May and I am about to take the NCLEX next week. I do currently have a temporary new grad license...

    But I just want to know why are there no jobs available? I live in Rhode Island and the employment here is horrible. Almost every single hospital that does have positions available wants at least 1-2 years of med-surg experience. How are we ever supposed to get experience if we can't get a job?? Even the few and far between positions for nurses at clinics and doctor's offices want 3-5 years experience, plus specialty experience. It is downright depressing.

    One of the reasons I chose the health care field was because "there would always be jobs available." That is such a lie. Whenever I tell people that I just graduated and will be an RN they always say, at least you will never be without a job! That is so false.

    When I spoke with the nurses at the hospitals where I did my clinical rotations, they said they felt so bad for us and how back in the 80's hospitals were begging them to take positions and even offering sign on bonuses.

    I just feel like it will be so long before I ever find a job that I won't remember half of the stuff I learned
    Last edit by Joe V on Jun 26, '13 : Reason: spacing
    jmiraRN, TomGuy, lildebbie, and 3 others like this.
  2. 172 Comments so far...

  3. 23
    In the immortal words of Bill Clinton, "It's the economy, stupid."

    Older nurses who by now would like to be retiring or going to part-time can't because their spouses are out of work since the depression, their savings are shot, and their adult children are living at home or can't get scholarships to pay for college. Hospitals are squeezing every damn dime out of reimbursement from insurance carriers and the Medicare/Medicaid funds, which are shrinking, and one clever way they think they can save money is by hiring fewer RNs. Dumb, we know, and they are starting to find out that they have increased infection and readmission rates with fewer RNs, but they haven't totally turned the corner yet.

    Hang on, keep looking, and realize that a lot of us will die in harness, and then you can have our jobs.
    jmiraRN, HappyWife77, notallwhowander, and 20 others like this.
  4. 3
    That is a good point you made about the older RNs who can't retire. But wouldn't it be smarter for the hospitals to lay off or offer early retirement to the older RNs and hire new RNs who I am sure will get paid a lot less than what RNs who have been working for 30+ years make, plus all their sick/vacation time they have accrued? Whoever is running the hospitals doesn't seem to be too intelligent. The hospital my mom used to work at is in shambles and half of the units are closed down. It is such a mess
    natnat122, paradiseboundRN, and kalevra like this.
  5. 28
    Quote from vab229

    But wouldn't it be smarter for the hospitals to lay off or offer early retirement to the older RNs
    Yeah, lay them off! Then they'll be in the same boat you are.

    There is a reason they can't retire, they need money.

    Early retirement? What is that? Most nurses have no retirement, only what they may or may not have managed to put away for themselves.
  6. 3
    I don't know......
    A local psych hospital got rid of all of their older nurses last year by offering "early retirement packages". The only thing is they never hired any nurses after that..
    Last edit by vab229 on Jun 25, '13
    natnat122, anotherone, and kalevra like this.
  7. 36
    Quote from vab229
    That is a good point you made about the older RNs who can't retire. But wouldn't it be smarter for the hospitals to lay off or offer early retirement to the older RNs and hire new RNs who I am sure will get paid a lot less than what RNs who have been working for 30+ years make, plus all their sick/vacation time they have accrued? Whoever is running the hospitals doesn't seem to be too intelligent. The hospital my mom used to work at is in shambles and half of the units are closed down. It is such a mess
    Short answer, no.

    Here's why:
    New nurses need experienced nurses to back them up. They don't know everything. No one ever does, but those experienced nurses know a heck of a lot more than new nurses. Skill mix is important to patient safety.

    Regarding social security:
    First, one must reach a certain age for full benefits. Secondly, have you looked at social security benefits lately? More than likely, it will not cover costs of living. These nurses must continue working to be able to afford to live. They will also need health insurance coverage, which many currently have through their employer; it's cost-prohibitive otherwise. Medicare doesn't kick in until age 65 unless other qualifications are met.

    And a final thought:
    Expecting hospitals to get rid of experienced nurses in favor of new grads reeks of entitlement. How would you feel if you're that experienced nurse who is expected to step aside so that the new grad can take away your job?
  8. 12
    So you expect nurses to start collecting social security early (at only 75% of the PIA) instead of waiting until their FRA when they can collect 100% of the PIA? Just so they can hire you?
    montecarlo64, joanna73, Surprised1, and 9 others like this.
  9. 20
    Unfortunately lots of people have fallen for the " become a nurse, you can always get a job" line.Usually put out there by schools trying to lure people into enrolment. It's also a myth perpetrated by people who have no idea of what they are talking about.
    jmiraRN, HarryTheCat, not.done.yet, and 17 others like this.
  10. 12
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    Short answer, no.

    Here's why:
    New nurses need experienced nurses to back them up. They don't know everything. No one ever does, but those experienced nurses know a heck of a lot more than new nurses. Skill mix is important to patient safety.

    Regarding social security:
    First, one must reach a certain age for full benefits. Secondly, have you looked at social security benefits lately? More than likely, it will not cover costs of living. These nurses must continue working to be able to afford to live. They will also need health insurance coverage, which many currently have through their employer; it's cost-prohibitive otherwise. Medicare doesn't kick in until age 65 unless other qualifications are met.

    And a final thought:
    Expecting hospitals to get rid of experienced nurses in favor of new grads reeks of entitlement. How would you feel if you're that experienced nurse who is expected to step aside so that the new grad can take away your job?
    Good points. Plus the fact that training new grads costs money.Another good reason for hanging onto experienced nurses.
  11. 3
    Ok you guys don't have to jump on me. But I know for a fact that a local hospital has nurses that are so old working there that they can barely walk up and down the hallways.
    What is it going to get to the point that you have a nurse coming into a patients room in a damn wheelchair with a magnifying glass to read the labels on the meds they are about to dispense?
    It is also terrible to promote nursing as career path that will have a steady need for employees and a promising job outlook. Don't you think it sucks that there are lets say 700 new grads and none of them can get a job anywhere? So what does that mean? That I am going to be stuck living at home with my mom supporting me (my mom who is an older nurse) and so then she won't ever be able to retire because I will be the monkey on her back for the next 5 years while I sit around waiting for a job? It seems like a viscous and kind of downright stupid circle.
    So basically this generation is screwed because nobody can/will retire. Then everyone wonders why there are so many people on the take.
    If I had to do it over again I wouldn't have even bothered. The whole scenario seems absolutely asinine.
    natnat122, MissH1967, and Marisette like this.


Top