Why are there no nursing jobs available for new grads? What is going on?? - page 16

I just graduated from an ASN program in May and I am about to take the NCLEX next week. I do currently have a temporary new grad license... But I just want to know why are there no jobs... Read More

  1. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    4
    Quote from scaredsilly
    LadyFree,
    I agree with live and learn and perhaps when I am a member of that crusty old bat society I will understand the ramifications of everything the way you do. In the meantime we need to agree to disagree. I graduated high school with a 4.5 gpa and was excepted into my first choice school at the age of 17, so I trusted what I was told.
    I learned from an early age that my parents would NEVER afford to assist me in my college decisions; I had a 3.95 average and had TONs of scholarships-to be exact:10 full rides, including at my local CC, 3 75% rides and 3 50% rides, however, I grew up in a household where both parents did not go to college, let alone knew the current college process at the time; I had to make those decisions myself; it took me into my second year of school-and many classes later at my local CC -because I had no means to travel or even afford dormitory university settings-I looked at that realistically-to start making decisions on my own, I bucked the chance without the help of advisors and returning to their nursing program after first semester failure and making some hard wrought decisions.

    I had access to my own computer and Internet, and started making better decisions about what steps I needed to take to go to school, not withstanding making some decisions and moves that had set me back; however, I took those missteps as lessons learned and made BETTER decisions along the way, and one of them was never let my pride slip to the point of desperation, and NEVER be so humble enough to be a doormat; especially in this business-it's a tough business as much as life itself is tough is- it's best to be observant and objective to make the BEST decisions, no matter how long it takes; notwithstanding to also take what the BEST aspects of this business.

    I don't regret my decisions either, I have taken all my setback in stride-from being a nursing school failure to going to dusting myself off to be successful as a LPN, to a BSN and not succeeding at my fist job and basically not finding my footing until post BSN program 2 years-removed time, I made the decision NOT to be bitter, burned out regretful or unhappy; I made my OWN decisions; it has been a heck of a ride, and made me a better person holistically.
  2. Visit  imagenthings profile page
    0
    There are nursing positions out there for new grads. It took me 2 years to find a full-time nursing position. Think far outside the box and talk to people. Hospitals, LTCs, clinics and doctor's offices are not all that is out there for nurses. I found a position in an Adult Day Health Center - Medical Model. I never heard of any such thing in my life. Had no idea that a new grad could be considered for case management. They were asking for "3-5 years experience in med/surg, or ambulatory care, case management experience preferred." I had no experience, no money and no confidence left. I tried out anyway. I got it. The director later told me that she met with me first to see if I would "fit". Believe me, you will meet that person willing to give you a chance and train you. Keep your chin up. Some ideas, try lesser known hospitals, school nursing, working with the differently abled, drug rehab centers or diagnostic/imaging centers. Per-diem nurses and travel nurses are also good resources because they work or have worked in many different environments and may be able to give u a lead that you never knew existed. Good luck.
  3. Visit  RedInScrubs profile page
    4
    There are a lot of complex factors involved with nursing jobs, not simply the fact that older nurses won't retire.

    Most states don't require specific ratios for patients and nurses, so facilities increase ratios to try and save money. They also hire more non-licensed personnel, because they cost less, along with increased ratios for RNs, both of which cost nurses their jobs.

    There is also the question of retirement for older nurses, though I would say that's not always a reason why jobs are harder to find for new grads in certain areas. Yes, experienced nurses needing to work longer is a factor for new grads, because they simply don't have the experience that established nurses do, and require an investment to orient and train. That investment also costs facilities money, and many don't want to put in the money to properly train new grads, so they don't.

    Contrary to popular notions, not all areas are friendly to established nurses. Areas which mandate pay increase for nurses with experience tend to hire new grads, because they cost less than the established nurses.

    What it ends up coming down to in the end is that quality nursing care done right is expensive, and many hospitals and other facilities don't want to pay more out of their bottom dollar, despite the overwhelming proof that investing more in nursing and nurses has better outcomes for professional environment, patient outcomes, and business outcomes. They are also not mandated to focus on primary instead of specialty care, which focuses more on quality nursing care, which also costs nurses jobs.

    If we want to blame someone and change the job scenario, we should blame the American healthcare system, and the approach to health care as a business rather than public investnent. The Affordable Care Act is going in the right direction with that, but American health care has a LONG way to go.
    kiszi, Not_A_Hat_Person, scaredsilly, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    7
    Quote from scaredsilly
    we went to school because we believed all the hype that jobs would be relatively easy to find
    This is part of what limits the sympathy... Nobody who's entered nursing school in the last 6 years has any excuse not to have realized the reality of what they were facing with regard to limited employment opportunities.
  5. Visit  scaredsilly profile page
    1
    Quote from RedInScrubs
    There are a lot of complex factors involved with nursing jobs, not simply the fact that older nurses won't retire.

    Most states don't require specific ratios for patients and nurses, so facilities increase ratios to try and save money. They also hire more non-licensed personnel, because they cost less, along with increased ratios for RNs, both of which cost nurses their jobs.

    There is also the question of retirement for older nurses, though I would say that's not always a reason why jobs are harder to find for new grads in certain areas. Yes, experienced nurses needing to work longer is a factor for new grads, because they simply don't have the experience that established nurses do, and require an investment to orient and train. That investment also costs facilities money, and many don't want to put in the money to properly train new grads, so they don't.

    Contrary to popular notions, not all areas are friendly to established nurses. Areas which mandate pay increase for nurses with experience tend to hire new grads, because they cost less than the established nurses.

    What it ends up coming down to in the end is that quality nursing care done right is expensive, and many hospitals and other facilities don't want to pay more out of their bottom dollar, despite the overwhelming proof that investing more in nursing and nurses has better outcomes for professional environment, patient outcomes, and business outcomes. They are also not mandated to focus on primary instead of specialty care, which focuses more on quality nursing care, which also costs nurses jobs.

    If we want to blame someone and change the job scenario, we should blame the American healthcare system, and the approach to health care as a business rather than public investnent. The Affordable Care Act is going in the right direction with that, but American health care has a LONG way to go.
    Exactly!! nurse patient ratios especially should be mandated! patient safety is at risk.

    As for older nurses retiring, I agree, they should not be forced into retirement, they paid their dues-they should be allowed to work for as long as they are able to do so if that's what they want. That doesn't mean new grads should not be given a chance though...some of us really are going to become great nurses once we get some experience.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  6. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    2
    Quote from cd365c
    Move to an area where they hire adns.
    And where would that be?

    Start working in the nursing home. After you grab experience, go to a hospital
    Can you name any hospitals that hire nurses with only nursing home experience? In my area, nursing home jobs lead to either nursing home jobs or home health jobs. And the wrong nursing home job can be extremely hazardous to a new grad's license.
    RedInScrubs and icuRNmaggie like this.
  7. Visit  scaredsilly profile page
    2
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    And where would that be?



    Can you name any hospitals that hire nurses with only nursing home experience? In my area, nursing home jobs lead to either nursing home jobs or home health jobs. And the wrong nursing home job can be extremely hazardous to a new grad's license.
    I have heard the same thing about nursing home jobs...so I applied only as a last resort.

    Kind of amazing that we get all this advise to move. Some of us just cannot move across the country! But as far as where they hire ADNs, I think that the more rural areas do that. Where I am, they hire only BSNs in hospitals and I think most bigger cities are that way, but I know that ADNs are hired in a pretty rural area about 5 hours south of me.
    RedInScrubs and icuRNmaggie like this.
  8. Visit  DatMurse profile page
    4
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    And where would that be?



    Can you name any hospitals that hire nurses with only nursing home experience? In my area, nursing home jobs lead to either nursing home jobs or home health jobs. And the wrong nursing home job can be extremely hazardous to a new grad's license.
    my hospital in ND hires adns and any nurses really. they train them here for hospital.
    ICUman, Biosciencegeek, LadyFree28, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  Biosciencegeek profile page
    1
    Quote from scaredsilly
    This is a bit harsh! We worked our butts off to get through school, we worked just as hard to pass the dreaded NCLEX, we went to school because we believed all the hype that jobs would be relatively easy to find and then we can't even get an interview. No one ever promised the world was fair, but we expected at least some consideration. Most of us are willing to work cheap-or even free to prove ourselves. I think we graduated with a right to at least not have every application we turned in go into the 'not under consideration' file as soon as we hit submit. I got lucky and I am NOT better than anyone else, but I DO work hard to earn the right to keep my coveted job. Eithers will as well!
    I wasn't trying to be harsh, and I'm sorry if you took it that way. I even went as far to say that this is not always the case, if you'd read my entire post, instead of skimming it for the highlights to get emotional over. Of course I know that there are exceptions. I realize that there are great grads out there that are looked over, and that they are willing to work anywhere for experience. That's where the area comes into play. One may need to move to a different area. I'm not lumping all new grads together, I'm just going on what I hear every day.
    Last edit by Biosciencegeek on Sep 10, '14
    icuRNmaggie likes this.
  10. Visit  scaredsilly profile page
    3
    Quote from Biosciencegeek
    I wasn't trying to be harsh, and I'm sorry if you took it that way. I even went as far to say that this is not always the case, if you'd read my entire post, instead of skimming it for the highlights to get emotional over. Of course I know that there are exceptions. I realize that there are great grads out there that are looked over, and that they are willing to work anywhere for experience. That's where the area comes into play. One may need to drive an extra 30 miles or so to a different area. I'm not lumping all new grads together, I'm just going on what I hear every day.
    I applied for jobs that were a 90 minute drive from home. I applied at SNFs and LTCs. I even applied at a hospice and at a home hospice. I was willing to work anywhere just go get that coveted one year experience. Where I live, no one is new grad friendly! I got my dream job out of the blue and am more grateful for it than I can express, but some classmates of mine are still looking and a few who had better grades and more leadership skills than I have still have not gotten their first interview.

    Perhaps you weren't trying to be harsh, but it really is rough out there for new grad nurses. It is soul destroying to know that these people worked so hard and are waiting tables because no one thinks that their applications are even worth looking at. I don't think (as someone said) that anyone should have to retire so that I have a spot, but I do think with so many jobs going unfilled, they could at least look at new grad resumes!
  11. Visit  Biosciencegeek profile page
    2
    It's all about the area. Plain and simple. Just because a hospital in NY or RI hires BSNs only, that doesn't mean that's the "norm" for the other 48 states. ADNs in my area are hired all the time. Straight into area hospitals. Right after passing the NCLEX. Here, it's the LPNs that are restricted to nursing homes. They have been talking about "phasing out" LPNs since the 80's, but every LPN grad I talk to has job offers.
    Last edit by Biosciencegeek on Sep 10, '14
    ICUman and icuRNmaggie like this.
  12. Visit  scaredsilly profile page
    3
    In my area they only hire BSNs also, and I am a BSN. They all seem to have new grad phobia.
  13. Visit  Biosciencegeek profile page
    1
    Quote from scaredsilly
    I applied for jobs that were a 90 minute drive from home. I applied at SNFs and LTCs. I even applied at a hospice and at a home hospice. I was willing to work anywhere just go get that coveted one year experience. Where I live, no one is new grad friendly! I got my dream job out of the blue and am more grateful for it than I can express, but some classmates of mine are still looking and a few who had better grades and more leadership skills than I have still have not gotten their first interview.

    Perhaps you weren't trying to be harsh, but it really is rough out there for new grad nurses. It is soul destroying to know that these people worked so hard and are waiting tables because no one thinks that their applications are even worth looking at. I don't think (as someone said) that anyone should have to retire so that I have a spot, but I do think with so many jobs going unfilled, they could at least look at new grad resumes!
    I hear what you're saying, and I'm glad you got a job. I agree that new grad resumes should always be considered. I hate that it's that way in your area. Maybe things will get better there. I hope so, and I wish new nurses there the very best.
    icuRNmaggie likes this.

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