What's the process for moving out of state after licensing??

  1. 0 I've been looking into moving out of state after I obtain my RN license next summer. My Significant other is in the Navy, which is my motivation to relocate. From what I understand, the student (me) should license in the state they went to school in (Ohio) and then transfer their license to the desired state. But when should i start applying for jobs? before or after i've gotten my license transferred? Do you think that the time spent moving and being unemployed will look poor on my resume?
    So i was wondering, did any of you get your first nursing job out of your home state? what was the process you went though? How long did it take to find a job?

    Any information or resources you can provide me would be really appreciated.
  2. Visit  Steph001 profile page

    About Steph001

    From 'OH'; Joined Sep '12; Posts: 11.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  ElSea profile page
    1
    I can't wait to hear the answers, I have the same question.
    MissMeeks likes this.
  4. Visit  chare profile page
    2
    The NCLEX is a national standard examination. You can go to school in one state, apply for licensure in another, and sit for the examination in any authorized test center in the world.

    If you know that you are not planning on working in Ohio after graduation, there is no reason for you to obtain initial licensure there. You would be paying for a license that you will not be using. Plus, each time you apply for licensure by endorsement in another state, they are going to require an endorsement from every state you have ever been licensed in.

    If you are going to apply for a new graduate residency you will apply before you are licensed, and probably before you have even taken the NCLEX examination. Most new graduate residency programs have a late enough start date to allow time for testing and obtaining the results.

    If you graduate in December, you should have had your application in already, particularly if you are applying for a new graduate residency. If you graduate in the spring, you have some time. However, if know where your significant other is going to be stationed, plan on applying for a new graduate residency, I would suggest reviewing the facility’s website.

    The time you spend moving is not going to hurt you, particularly if you are talking to nurse recruiters or have applied for a position prior to moving.

    Good luck in school and with your job search, and thank your significant other for his service.

    Semper Fidelis!
    emoraver and MissMeeks like this.
  5. Visit  turnforthenurseRN profile page
    1
    Army wife here. I knew my husband was going to get stationed in Texas so I knew that is where I would be moving. I went to nursing school in Ohio, took an NCLEX review course there and took my NCLEX there, but I opted out of an Ohio license. Since I wasn't staying in Ohio, it was pointless to be licensed in that state. I got my first license in the state of Texas. Texas is a compact state so initially I wasn't given a compact license because at that time my permanent residence was listed in Ohio, but once I established a permanent residence in Texas, I was granted a compact license.

    I found that it was easier to find a job once I moved to Texas. I sent in application after application to hospitals in Texas while I was still living in Ohio, but no one ever called me. I tweaked my resume a little and once I had a permanent Texas address (and applied with that), I started getting calls for interviews. I secured a job within 2 weeks of moving to Texas, but all in all I was applying for jobs for 3 months before I found anything.
    roxybabe84 likes this.
  6. Visit  roxybabe84 profile page
    0
    Hi TurnfortheNurseRN, how would you say the job climate is in Texas right now? I graduated RN school in May and am still looking but not finding any luck where I am in the east coast (MD, VA, DC area). I have family in Houston and have thought of looking there, but not sure what my odds would be right now.


    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    Army wife here. I knew my husband was going to get stationed in Texas so I knew that is where I would be moving. I went to nursing school in Ohio, took an NCLEX review course there and took my NCLEX there, but I opted out of an Ohio license. Since I wasn't staying in Ohio, it was pointless to be licensed in that state. I got my first license in the state of Texas. Texas is a compact state so initially I wasn't given a compact license because at that time my permanent residence was listed in Ohio, but once I established a permanent residence in Texas, I was granted a compact license.

    I found that it was easier to find a job once I moved to Texas. I sent in application after application to hospitals in Texas while I was still living in Ohio, but no one ever called me. I tweaked my resume a little and once I had a permanent Texas address (and applied with that), I started getting calls for interviews. I secured a job within 2 weeks of moving to Texas, but all in all I was applying for jobs for 3 months before I found anything.
  7. Visit  Sippie profile page
    0
    I went to school in AZ but we moved right after graduation due to hubbys job. So I licenced in the state where we moved to (NE) but took my actual physical boards in Wyoming because it was the closest testing site to where we lived in NE. Haha pretty confusing but yes you can do that.
  8. Visit  keylimesqueez profile page
    1
    I am really curious about this as well. I live in La and will be graduating in La. I do not want to work in La though. I would like to take my first job just about anywhere else in the country. It is my understanding that you have to have a permanent residence in the state prior to obtaining a license - so how would this work for me?
    MissMeeks likes this.
  9. Visit  GoVeg profile page
    1
    Why do you think you have to be a permanent resident? I've never heard of that. You can have licenses in multiple states and those that you don't live in as well. Does this only apply for your first license?
    MissMeeks likes this.
  10. Visit  JustBeachyNurse profile page
    2
    The only reason you need a permanent residence is if you apply to a compact state and want a multi state compact license.

    NJ is not part of the NLC but NE and MD are part of the NLC. If I apply to MD BoN as a NJ resident I just declare my state of residence as NJ and, assuming I meet the MD BoN requirements for licensing, would be issued a single state license valid only in MD. Once I moved to MD I can keep my NJ license as long as I pay the licensing fees and earn CEs. I notify MD of my new in state address change and they can update my MD license to a NLC MD multi state license.
    chare and keylimesqueez like this.
  11. Visit  keylimesqueez profile page
    0
    Quote from GoVeg
    Why do you think you have to be a permanent resident? I've never heard of that. You can have licenses in multiple states and those that you don't live in as well. Does this only apply for your first license?
    I'm not sure ... that's what I assumed I guess. ???
  12. Visit  keylimesqueez profile page
    0
    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    The only reason you need a permanent residence is if you apply to a compact state and want a multi state compact license.

    NJ is not part of the NLC but NE and MD are part of the NLC. If I apply to MD BoN as a NJ resident I just declare my state of residence as NJ and, assuming I meet the MD BoN requirements for licensing, would be issued a single state license valid only in MD. Once I moved to MD I can keep my NJ license as long as I pay the licensing fees and earn CEs. I notify MD of my new in state address change and they can update my MD license to a NLC MD multi state license.
    Thank you for the clarification!
  13. Visit  KellyRN2013 profile page
    0
    Quote from keylimesqueez
    I'm not sure ... that's what I assumed I guess. ???
    You have to have a permanent residence for any compact state. For instance, if you have an address in ohio but you move to VA then while you still have your ohio address you can have your license in VA as an endorsement but you will not have a compact licensure until you have a permanent VA address. But with the VA license you can practice in ALL the other compact states.
  14. Visit  KellyRN2013 profile page
    0
    Quote from roxybabe84
    Hi TurnfortheNurseRN, how would you say the job climate is in Texas right now? I graduated RN school in May and am still looking but not finding any luck where I am in the east coast (MD, VA, DC area). I have family in Houston and have thought of looking there, but not sure what my odds would be right now.
    Where are you located at on the east cost within the MD, VA, DC area? that's a pretty large area. I am in southwest VA and if you apply near Richmond, VA or around that area you should have no problem landing a job. Again, I am not sure if you are near Richmond but they have a ton of employment opportunities for all nurses! Good luck to you!


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