Residencies: doctors have it figured out - page 7

After chatting with a fourth year med student today at clinical, it occurred to me how vastly different the physician career-path is from our own. Fourth year medical students are undergoing the... Read More

  1. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    2
    Both doctors and nurses are at risk for harming/killing patients due to medication errors, but the initial diagnosis process adds a crucial difference. If they get that wrong the consequences can end up to be quite dire - depending on what the patient actually has vs what the doc diagnosed and treated for.

    Although I do know that nurses are also the eyes and ears of the medical doctor and really experienced nurses do bring forward their observations - leading to a change in the medical diagnosis. Hopefully we watch out for each other. A really good doctor doesn't get their ego in the way when it seems they may have missed something, just because it was a nurse who provided the input.
    joanna73 and SummitRN like this.
  2. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    Residencies might be a good idea, but if nurses are expected to complete a 2 year residency, then the pay needs to increase. Doctors make a lot more than 25 dollars an hour. Really, they would be wise to revamp the system within the BSN program and make that the mandatory entry point. Students would have 4 years of clinical time instead of 2 years, and a one year residency afterwards.
  3. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    I don't believe that the level of responsibility of nurses are on the same level as a doctor. Are we in dangerous positions as nurses? Yes! Emphatically, yes.

    Staff nurses don't get phone calls on patients at home, when they've reported off to the oncoming nurse. We don't have the same level of obligation as a doctor does. Our obligation is gone when we leave, and starts back up when we come back.

    Does that make sense at all?
    ER physicians and hospitalists are the same. They don't take calls when they are off duty. The come to work, work their shift then go home. They don't get called by nurses or patients at home.
  4. Visit  FlorenceNtheMachine profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    ER physicians and hospitalists are the same. They don't take calls when they are off duty. The come to work, work their shift then go home. They don't get called by nurses or patients at home.
    So a couple specialities overrides the vast majority? Ive called hospitalists at home to clarify orders, and so have many of my colleagues. I stand behind what I say.

    My stance on the OP would be, I love residencies and orientations. I felt my school prepared me well enough on the tasky things in the hospital. Med admin, making beds, IV and feeding pumps. So I feel like residencies should grow the decision making part of nursing. Should they be longer like doctors? Hmm, depends on the environment.
    Last edit by FlorenceNtheMachine on Mar 18, '13
  5. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    So a couple specialities overrides the vast majority?

    *** What? Where did you get that? What a strange thing to say.

    Ive called hospitalists at home to clarify orders, and so have many of my colleagues. I stand behind what I say.
    *** Pretty much defeats the purpose of having a hospitalist program.

    My stance on the OP would be, I love residencies and orientations. I felt my school prepared me well enough on the tasky things in the hospital. Med admin, making beds, IV and feeding pumps. So I feel like residencies should grow the decision making part of nursing. Should they be longer like doctors? Hmm, depends on the environment
    *** No need to reinvent the wheel here. Nurse residencies don't need to be anything like as lomg as physician. We already have tons of good data supporting 9-12 month residencies. Might have to pry the data out of the hands of the private hospitals that have it though.
  6. Visit  soxgirl2008 profile page
    0
    Quote from joanna73
    Residencies might be a good idea, but if nurses are expected to complete a 2 year residency, then the pay needs to increase. Doctors make a lot more than 25 dollars an hour. Really, they would be wise to revamp the system within the BSN program and make that the mandatory entry point. Students would have 4 years of clinical time instead of 2 years, and a one year residency afterwards.
    I don't know any BSN programs that have 4 years of clinical...all the BSN programs around here have 2 years of pre reqs and 2 years of clinical... The ADN programs have 1 year of pre reqs and 2 years of clinical. If you wanted the BSN programs to have 4 years of clinicals it would take much longer than 4 years to fit in 4 years of clinical time AND pre reqs. Most BSN students here need to take classes in the summer as well just to finish in 4 years with the way it is now.
  7. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    In my area, one university offers a co-op program where students are offered paid student nurse preceptor-ship, at least that's how a few of my co-workers described it...they are able have a full assignment of pts. They were able to have three semesters of focused pt care in between semesters that included clinicals as well. This is a five-year program; students with the four year program have one co-op experience. It ends up being 3-3.5 years of clinical experience.

    Depending on the coursework layout of some university programs, people do end up having 4 years of clinicals, including pre-requisites. When I first went for nursing school, for my ADN, I was doing prerequisites along with nursing courses. For me, that was disastrous. When I decided to return to school and went through the PN program, where you are in clinicals within the second week, I knew that I had to separate prereq's and then focus on nursing. The program I graduated from, you were in clinical within the next week. Clinicals rounded out to be about 3 years worth in 2.5 years. But that's how I tailored my education. It worked for me, and was able to find an organization that automatically has a nurse residency program.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Mar 20, '13
  8. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
  9. Visit  kl10pm profile page
    0
    Quote from joanna73
    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
    I'm Canadian and in a BScN program, and like you mentioned we have 4 years of clinical. But I will graduate after a total of 4 years, as there were no prerequisites we entered into the nursing program right from high school.
  10. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    You've taken the prerequisite courses in high school. For people who do not go straight into nursing school after high school (such as myself) there is a year of prerequisites, if you do not have them.
  11. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
    0
    Quote from joanna73
    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
    Yes, I did five years total including prerequisites and we had clinical during all four years.
  12. Visit  Redriver profile page
    0
    Residents get paid about $10 an hour on average.
  13. Visit  Redriver profile page
    0
    There are recent work restrictions on residencies. Interns work 80 hours per week, upper level residents can work many more hours than that. There is also talk that they will increase the work hour limit, as many believe that post-graduate training is not sufficient. I would also like to point out that before these work hour restrictions residency would easily mean >120 hours a week, for up to 8 years, not counting fellowship. Just something to think about when comparing older doctors to younger ones. What I'm really trying to say is, if you do decide, as a profession, to start residencies, it will rapidly become mandatory. And everybody will have to do it to get a job. Which will basically double the amount of time you are required to be trained.

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