No luck with a new grad job- should I go back to school? Any nurse managers around? - page 2

by BA_anthropology 5,302 Views | 16 Comments

I'm wondering if I go back for either an RN-MSN program or a RN-BSN program, will I still find myself just as unemployable? I gradated in Dec 2011 with an RN diploma degree. Right after graduation, I moved out of the country... Read More


  1. 0
    I am an RN that completed a BSN program for licensure. I have had more than one job in a year. It's a long story not my fault but not wholly appropriate for the Internet. It was my experience that hospitals tended to want the BSN grads if they could get them (if able to be choosey when hiring as they can be in this economy). It depends on where you live though, each region can be very different. Maybe look in your area to see if any of the hospitals have orientation programs just for new graduate (or inexperienced) RNs. It was also my experience that (at least the hospitals I was considering) considered new hires new grads until they had one year of experience working as an RN.

    Research places you might want to work, get to know a lot about them (that way if you get an interview you have already considered some options about what you might say as to why you'd work there or what attracted you). In general, be very well prepared for any interviews and go with notes if allowed . Update and proofread your resume several times, give cover letters an equal amount of attention (read them out loud and/or have someone else help proof them). First impressions matter a lot, especially in this job market. Contact old clinical instructors, reach out to them about job seeking, see if any old instructors/preceptors would be willing to be references for you (healthcare is a very small world).
  2. 0
    Use this time to do whatever you can to stand out. I just graduated from as associates program this past May 2012. I went straight into an RN-to-BSN program b/c most places around here want a BSN. I am still trying to apply to jobs - but I honestly I go back and forth between feeling hopeful and hopeless. What can I do anymore? I just do what I have to do at the moment- which is getting through this program. And what is worse is that everyone in my class has a nursing job now, so I just feel like the odd man out.

    I am going to start volunteering in a couple of weeks at a hospice. That is something you might want to consider. You can also try to obtain special skills and training, such as ACLS. Keep on applying and updating your resume. I have been on only one patient care tech interview (and I am a licensed nurse) and I stuck around and interviewed at a nursing home open house, even though the coordinator blatantly said that they just hired 5 new nurses and were looking for experienced only. I decided to pursue the interview, even though it was optional for me, just to get an idea of what sort of questions may be asked in future interviews. So, I would suggest attending open houses to get a feel for questions and practice mock interviews.

    Sometimes I feel like there is no rhyme and reason as to who they hire. It's either who you know or luck. I know a couple people who have no healthcare experience and got hired. While I feel happy for them (as it shows it can happen even with no healthcare experience), I desperately hope that I am bestowed some of that luck . Good luck- do whatever you can to sharpen your skills or show that you have been active in some way or another in the community.


    I am taking a big financial gamble here. I already have a previous bachelor's degree, my associates in nursing, and now I am in a year long RN-to-BSN program. I am worried sick that I still won't find a job. But, I just forged ahead and I hope for the best. You cannot tell what the future holds anymore.
    Last edit by Scarlettz on Nov 4, '12
  3. 1
    I disagree with the poster who says RNs who get a BSN aren't new grads. According to many hospitals (stated on their websites) any RN with less than 6 months professional experience is eligible for new grad residency programs.

    You will be a new grad RN BSN regardless of how long you've been an RN an been unemployed. Besides, if you're applying to jobs before you graduate with your BSN and right after then you will be, by definition, a new grad.
    DanielleRyanKokkonen likes this.
  4. 0
    The big issue is that right now you are not going to be a desirable candidate until after the baby. Why? Because as a new grad you have to have the new grad preceptorship which generally is about 3 months and you'll be going out on maternity leave... why would they hire you right now?

    Your best bet is to obtain additional skills, ie ACLS, and a BSN, while opening your search for positions to include Homehealth and Long Term/ Rehab, or skilled nursing facilities.

    These places provide a place for you to practice your nursing, especially time management and assessment skills, you'd be surprised at the type of patients and complexities of care that you can get from these locations nowadays.

    A lot of my friends who were ADN RNs worked in long term care and home health while getting their BSN and as soon as they received it were hired onto the hospital units... despite not having the "acute care" designation next to their experience.

    The nurse manager that hired them said, " Because you have a BSN and that is what we want, but also you learned something new grads are lacking, time management."
  5. 0
    thank you for posting this topic because i too, have the same question. I graduated with my ASN in May and I am having a hard time finding a job. I worked for about 2 months in a clinic but it did not work out. Anyways, i live in the Miami area and i have been on the hunt but honestly there is NOTHING out there for new grads. My fellow classmates all got jobs because of "connections", and it seems i am the only one without a job now. I have sent out at least 100 applications, have spoke to recruiters in hospitals/outpatient/urgent care places and no is hiring. I'm really hoping things pick up in the new year. Due to financial reasons, i cannot afford to go on like this for months waiting to find a nursing job. I am due to start school again in Jan to take two classes i need to start the RN-BSN program in the summer and have thought about getting a "non-nursing" job in the meantime- better known as a 9-5. I just don't know how it would look being all this time without a nursing job and if the market would be even better afterward. I do plan on continuing to apply for positions in the meantime though.
  6. 0
    My suggestion to you is to get your BSN, at the least. I live in Michigan I have 10 years experience and am unemployed and evidently unemployable. I am now in a BSN program, with the plan to keep going until I get my DNP. If Connecticut is anything like Michigan hospitals want Bachelors prepared nurses. They would rather hire one rather than a nurse with exemplary references (all the way back to nursing instructors) and 10 years of Acute Care experience. If you do a program online you don't have to take time away from your little girl and as long as you are motivated you will be fine. I am at Ferris State University's online BSN program, it is a good program and the nursing instructors are awesome. If you are at all interested in getting your MSN and are worried about the financial impact look at FNU, Frontier Nursing University. They have a 1 year ADN to MSN bridge program and their prices are the BEST I've seen. I think you can do the bridge, MSN and DNP in about 3-4 years, for less than $75k. Sounds like a lot I know but other Masters programs I've looked at are minimum of $35k per year! and it is 3-4 years for that alone. I hope you find something, I know it is frustrating, I cry regularly because I am a good nurse and it is my love, and I can't catch a break. To be in your position I probably would have given up by now, I hope you don't.
    Good Luck! Let me know if you have any other questions, I registered just to respond to you lol.
  7. 0
    Quote from Scarlettz
    Use this time to do whatever you can to stand out. I just graduated from as associates program this past May 2012. I went straight into an RN-to-BSN program b/c most places around here want a BSN. I am still trying to apply to jobs - but I honestly I go back and forth between feeling hopeful and hopeless. What can I do anymore? I just do what I have to do at the moment- which is getting through this program. And what is worse is that everyone in my class has a nursing job now, so I just feel like the odd man out.

    I am going to start volunteering in a couple of weeks at a hospice. That is something you might want to consider. You can also try to obtain special skills and training, such as ACLS. Keep on applying and updating your resume. I have been on only one patient care tech interview (and I am a licensed nurse) and I stuck around and interviewed at a nursing home open house, even though the coordinator blatantly said that they just hired 5 new nurses and were looking for experienced only. I decided to pursue the interview, even though it was optional for me, just to get an idea of what sort of questions may be asked in future interviews. So, I would suggest attending open houses to get a feel for questions and practice mock interviews.

    Sometimes I feel like there is no rhyme and reason as to who they hire. It's either who you know or luck. I know a couple people who have no healthcare experience and got hired. While I feel happy for them (as it shows it can happen even with no healthcare experience), I desperately hope that I am bestowed some of that luck . Good luck- do whatever you can to sharpen your skills or show that you have been active in some way or another in the community.


    I am taking a big financial gamble here. I already have a previous bachelor's degree, my associates in nursing, and now I am in a year long RN-to-BSN program. I am worried sick that I still won't find a job. But, I just forged ahead and I hope for the best. You cannot tell what the future holds anymore.


    Excellent advice!! Interview skills are VERY important. Hire someone to write your resume for you. Go to EVERY SINGLE open house you can find. Check out travel nursing...
    Last edit by DanielleRyanKokkonen on Apr 16, '13 : Reason: Quote


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