New Grad RN Jobs - page 3

by DysrhythmiaRN11

Hello, would anyone like to share their experience of finding a job as a new graduate: I will share my experience. I would like to start off by saying thats its not easy at all, but you cannot give up hope. I started job hunting... Read More


  1. 0
    That's a great, inspiring topic.
    Thank you very much.
  2. 0
    hi moonkid, I am sorry I cannot reply your PM because I am a new member, so i can only receive PM but I cannot reply. Can I share my information with you here?
  3. 0
    [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]I wouldlike to start by saying that I am 44 years old and I have been previouslyemployed as a bioprocess technician with a biotech company and have a degree inbiology/cellular molecular option. I have had previous experience and trainingin several health-related fields. I am a MLT and a phlebotomist. I think Ishould have thought twice about nursing and health care in general and stayedwith my original profession. I had a good job, making about 50K a year basesalary plus overtime, which I still would have if it was not for nursing. Themain reason that I went ahead and got my BSN was that my wife was relocatedfrom California to Portland, Oregon and there are no biotech companies there.In fact there are very few high paying jobs there at all. Due to the fact thatI had a good job in California and accepted into nursing school, my wife and Iagreed to live separately for 4 years so that I could complete this training. Igraduated in March and have been looking for a job since. Now that doesn’t soundlike a long time to be looking, but here is what I have found. No one ishiring! Not just new grad nurses but for most anything. I remember nights with 2 hours of sleep preppingfor clinicals and studying my ass off to pass my courses. Nursing was thehardest thing I have ever done and for what? There are no opportunities for newgrads anywhere. You have to be on a wait list to volunteer at the free clinic. Ican’t get my foot in the door at a hospital because my additional medicalexperience as a phlebotomist and a lab tech but that was years ago even thoughI still have kept up my licenses. Employers want you to have oodles ofexperience that was yesterday and no one will give you a chance. It seems as though they only hire insiderswhich you can’t become unless you meet people in the industry. It has been suggestedthat I volunteer. How can I volunteer if there are no openings for volunteers?Do tell me how to network if you have no options to meet people in industry? Itseems as though everyone has been given the same advice and is now either in themilitary, volunteering or on some rural assignment. The nursing shortage is completeBull ****. As a matter of fact Yahoo now doesn’t even put nursing in it’s to 10jobs of the future. I graduated in March and have been in Oregon since then andthe only job I have even interviewed for is a temp job at Lowes. This is by farthe worst economy I have ever lived through and it is not getting betterregardless of what is said. I can't wait for the nursing shortage of 2020. I amtoo god damn old and besides my skills would be eroded by then. I am thinkingabout just returning to biotech which means leaving my wife and returning toCalifornia.
    [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]
  4. 0
    Thank you for sharing your experience & congrats to you.
  5. 0
    Congrats! What kind of job did you end up taking?
  6. 0
    Hello everyone,
    Its 2013 nearly 2014 and I have not been active on this forum due to my busy life as a nurse. I hope everyone has had luck in finding jobs by now. From my desperate job search adventure as a new grad to my new life as an experienced nurse, I have finally landed a job I love through hard work. I have landed most of my jobs with just a ADN degree and my most recent destination has been in the OR. Its a cool job. I find that finding jobs was a challenge but my hard work has paid off. Starting in a nursing home and ending in the OR has been a big step for me. Never give up and don't allow people to tell you what you can or cannot do.
  7. 0
    congrats on your job I think persistence pays off I am at a nursing home as a new nurse too, and yes it is frustrating but I am going to continue to apply for other jobs...thanks for all the advice
  8. 0
    Quote from DysrhythmiaRN11
    Hello everyone,
    Its 2013 nearly 2014 and I have not been active on this forum due to my busy life as a nurse. I hope everyone has had luck in finding jobs by now. From my desperate job search adventure as a new grad to my new life as an experienced nurse, I have finally landed a job I love through hard work. I have landed most of my jobs with just a ADN degree and my most recent destination has been in the OR. Its a cool job. I find that finding jobs was a challenge but my hard work has paid off. Starting in a nursing home and ending in the OR has been a big step for me. Never give up and don't allow people to tell you what you can or cannot do.
    Thank u!! This is so reassuring for me to hear. Gud luck to you!
  9. 0
    Quote from yaqsin
    congrats on your job I think persistence pays off I am at a nursing home as a new nurse too, and yes it is frustrating but I am going to continue to apply for other jobs...thanks for all the advice
    Nursing homes are a good foot in the door. Most of the time people just want to see that you are a practicing nurse for x amount of time. The nursing home will get you to your goals...
  10. 0
    Well, if you just got a bachelor's degree, here's my 2 cents.

    Provincial town/rural hospitals have an aging nursing labor force, including people who got hired in the 1970s (I'm not kidding you-I'm working with them) when the educational standards were lower. This means they still have diploma nurses, LPNs, associate degree nurses working on hospital floors. If you apply there and have a BSN, your application will look favorably, because ultimately they want you. Ultimately the hospital wants to retire the older nurses and replace them with BSNs exclusively. Once they have BSNs all over the place, they can go for Magnet Status or some other prestigious recognition. Provincial hospitals have fallen behind the giants, but they want to catch up, because their CEOs are ambitious too, and the first step to catching up is having BSNs all over the place.

    On the other hand, if you just got your bachelors in nursing and you are applying at the award winning medical centers in Denver, NYC, LA, Chicago, etc., the famous trauma hospitals featured in Hollywood movies, then you are screwed because your competition consists exclusively of BSNs and even MSNs. In Chicago or LA it may be impossible to find a job, but college degrees are hanging on every tree, simply because it's far easier to take a loan and start taking classes, than it is to find a respectable job you will be happy with.

    Of course this begs the question "what happens in 30 years when BSN (or higher) is mandatory for any type of nursing work involving patient contact?" I think eventually we will get there-LPN schools and the like will have to close down and they will no longer issue those accelerated degrees. I'm not sure what the answer is, but this is a great question to ask.

    These are some of my own observations and my own principles that helped me to find work in the kind of unit I wanted to work.
    Last edit by Concerto_in_C on Dec 19, '13


Top