New Grad applicant walked on a unit today...

  1. 1
    I'm a new grad RN-ADN and in attempt to stand out from the gazillion applicants for the 1 new grad position, I walked on to a unit in attempt to simply introduce myself to the manager. I just wanted 2 seconds of her time. I completely understand how swamped with work they are, but I didn't even get those 2 seconds. All I wanted was to introduce myself, possibly hand over a resume, and merely express my interest in the position and hospital. That's all and I would walk away and she could throw my resume away the second I walked away if she wanted, but at least I tried my very best. Well that's what I was thinking may happen. I was trying to go the "extra mile" and have her put a face to the name.

    Instead, her door opened and she said she was in the middle of something and that if I wanted to schedule something I should have called then the door was literally shut on my face. Now I completely understand that in general if you want to set up a meeting, then you call and schedule, but in reality, what were the chances of me calling and her saying "sure come in on this day at this time" I doubt it. She seemed irritated with me just knocking on her door! Either way, I feel cut down in size after it took so much for me to muster up the courage to go through with it.

    I have heard of success stories where new grads get at least an interview from doing this and it is even on some of the articles posted here telling us how to get our first position, but today I feel discouraged to even try that again.

    What are your thoughts?
    Liddle Noodnik likes this.
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  3. 66 Comments so far...

  4. 7
    As hard as it is to find a job these days, I don't think you did the right thing here. You can't just walk onto a unit unannounced and uninvited. I know you want to show that you are proactive and a "go-getter", but this is just unprofessional. It is a process to land a job, and I had trouble out of school as well. You first start with calling HR to follow up on the status of your application about a week or two after it is submitted in full. Ask if you can arrange a brief phone conversation with the hiring manager. See where that takes you and leave it at that.

    Take this as a learning experience. If you want to stand out, make yourself stand out in a positive way. Demonstrate maturity and professionalism. I cannot stress enough however that your action was...misguided. Good luck and message me if you would like to discuss this further.
    opossum, VivaLasViejas, jtmarcy12, and 4 others like this.
  5. 2
    I agree with the above post. I completely understand what you were trying to do but if you think of it from the point of view of the manager... I don't think they would take an unannounced visit like that very well. I know I would be annoyed in that position.
    jtmarcy12 and tnmarie like this.
  6. 8
    Quote from BotoxBaby
    I'm a new grad RN-ADN and in attempt to stand out from the gazillion applicants for the 1 new grad position, I walked on to a unit in attempt to simply introduce myself to the manager. I just wanted 2 seconds of her time. I completely understand how swamped with work they are, but I didn't even get those 2 seconds. All I wanted was to introduce myself, possibly hand over a resume, and merely express my interest in the position and hospital. That's all and I would walk away and she could throw my resume away the second I walked away if she wanted, but at least I tried my very best. Well that's what I was thinking may happen. I was trying to go the "extra mile" and have her put a face to the name.

    Instead, her door opened and she said she was in the middle of something and that if I wanted to schedule something I should have called then the door was literally shut on my face. Now I completely understand that in general if you want to set up a meeting, then you call and schedule, but in reality, what were the chances of me calling and her saying "sure come in on this day at this time" I doubt it. She seemed irritated with me just knocking on her door! Either way, I feel cut down in size after it took so much for me to muster up the courage to go through with it.

    I have heard of success stories where new grads get at least an interview from doing this and it is even on some of the articles posted here telling us how to get our first position, but today I feel discouraged to even try that again.

    What are your thoughts?

    I hear you. The general idea anymore, however, is to go through the "typical" channels. I applaud you for going out of your way. Regardless of her schedule, the NM did not have to treat you that way. Yes, may she had a very urgent issue or two she was juggling at the moment. Doesn't matter. She was not professional at all. Funny how people want professionalism from one end, but can't seem to deliver it from their end--unless it suits their need at the moment.


    Listen. Mark this down in your memory banks. If she can't even muster a second's worth of politeness, no matter how brief, that reflects poorly on her AND THE ORGANIZATION FOR WHICH SHE WORKS.


    Soon enough the tables will be turning. The word will get out about this organization and its manger/s (if applicable). They will be the ones overwhelmed by filling the positions.

    What you did wasn't necessarily wrong. Appointments are nice, but people can't and in the current market probably won't get them w/o the 1 hour online application process, HR sorting, presorting, and all the rest of the rubbish. Getting out to open houses isn't that great either, b/c they may be schedule on days in which it is impossible to go, and they can be held only seasonally, if that. On top of that, many places are requring pre-registration and invitation only for open houses.

    Another event to chalk up to experience. Generally it's all set up that you have to go through HR, and some managers can get really ***** if applicants don't go this route.

    But remember what I am saying. Mark it down. The tables are turning. You will, soon enough, be in the driver's seat. Get involved in nursing organizations, volunteer, try to pay for your own PALS, ACLS, go to converences and events. Learn, learn, learn, and keep current on things. Bottom line, stay motivated, and don't give up.

    You might even try this technique again, but with a little more insight. It helps to know how things work in a place.

    Some might even try w/ this manager again--say at an event where you might see her. She probably wouldn't remember you. In principle, although it doesn't pay the bills, I would be reluctant to do this, b/c she couldn't even muster some brief courtesy to you.

    OTOH, perhaps there was something earth-shattering going on with her--perhaps even a serious family problem? Who knows? So if I were to approach her again, I think it would be at an event or in a situation that was somehow more relaxed and not intrusive. I wouldn't shove my resume in her face. I would just try to talk with her in general conversation. If I sensed that she was unapproachable and anything near to how she came off when you last saw her, I would politely move on and talk with other people and not bother with her again--not even though electronic application. It helps to get a feel for people, which is hard to do in a fair way in < 2 seconds. But if she behaviors similarly in subsequent encounters, I mean, do you really want to work under this person???? There are always issues in nursing that require manager insight and involvement. It's tough to work your role with managers like this--if that is indeed how she really is

    Always remember, however, that interviewing or "pre-interviewing" goes both ways. You are a valuable person, and respectfulness and courtesy goes both ways. When it doesn't, maybe there are extenuating circumstances, but if it patterns in the negative, you have to ask yourself the hard question of whether or not you could effectively work with this person.

    Don't beat yourself up about it. Cold-calling is tough business. Ask any sales person with this kind of experience.
    Last edit by samadams8 on Aug 31, '12
    Jay406, stash11, thisismeRN, and 5 others like this.
  7. 7
    Thank you for your input. I appreciate your points of view.

    I completely understand what you are both saying, I honestly do. Believe me, this is not something that I would ever think of doing on my own as I understand there are formalities and showing up unannounced can be considered unprofessional. However, understand that there are many posts here as well as fb forums that condone this. Many people have recently voiced that if it wasn't for the fact they walked on the unit, they would not have landed an interview or even the job. There are even a few people that recently started new grad programs who did that and were told that is the sole reason why they stood out. I guess it is just a hit and miss type thing and for me it was a miss. I am not trying to make my actions any better by hiding behind what others have done beforehand and I should have listened to my own instincts which told me not to do it. It's just in this hard job market for new grads I was willing to give it a shot. If I put myself in the manager's shoe, yes I agree, I may be annoyed too, but I don't think I would have reacted in that way, that's just me.
    Jay406, stash11, thisismeRN, and 4 others like this.
  8. 5
    Quote from BotoxBaby
    Thank you for your input. I appreciate your points of view.

    I completely understand what you are both saying, I honestly do. Believe me, this is not something that I would ever think of doing on my own as I understand there are formalities and showing up unannounced can be considered unprofessional. However, understand that there are many posts here as well as fb forums that condone this. Many people have recently voiced that if it wasn't for the fact they walked on the unit, they would not have landed an interview or even the job. There are even a few people that recently started new grad programs who did that and were told that is the sole reason why they stood out. I guess it is just a hit and miss type thing and for me it was a miss. I am not trying to make my actions any better by hiding behind what others have done beforehand and I should have listened to my own instincts which told me not to do it. It's just in this hard job market for new grads I was willing to give it a shot. If I put myself in the manager's shoe, yes I agree, I may be annoyed too, but I don't think I would have reacted in that way, that's just me.

    Like I say BotoxBaby, seriously I applaud your effort and gonads. Try to do some reconnaissance work ahead of time.

    Never say die!!!!
  9. 2
    I have heard of several new grads getting job this way. All everyone says is "make yourself stand out", put a face to the resume. Even the nurse recruiter at the hospital I was just hired at told me people who walk into her office have a better chance than those who just e-mail or fax their resume. I admire your courage and I wish you luck!
    LindseyRN86 and BotoxBaby like this.
  10. 5
    Perhaps she read this article, especially numbers 3 and 4 on her list of things to do, which includes walking onto units, using Google to find out the name and e-mail address of the manager of the floor you want to work on, etc.

    How To Get a Job As a New Grad Nurse

    There's some great advice in there, but I remember thinking at the time not every manager views aggressive tactics as a sign of a go-getter. It's a gamble that can backfire as well as enhance your prospects.
    hiddencatRN, opossum, tnmarie, and 2 others like this.
  11. 3
    Quote from samadams8
    I hear you. The general idea anymore, however, is to go through the "typical" channels. I applaud you for going out of your way. Regardless of her schedule, the NM did not have to treat you that way. Yes, may she had a very urgent issue or two she was juggling at the moment. Doesn't matter. She was not professional at all. Funny how people want professionalism from one end, but can't seem to deliver it from their end--unless it suits their need at the moment.


    Listen. Mark this down in your memory banks. If she can't even muster a second's worth of politeness, no matter how brief, that reflects poorly on her AND THE ORGANIZATION FOR WHICH SHE WORKS.


    Soon enough the tables will be turning. The word will get out about this organization and its manger/s (if applicable). They will be the ones overwhelmed by filling the positions.

    What you did wasn't necessarily wrong. Appointments are nice, but people can't and in the current market probably won't get them w/o the 1 hour online application process, HR sorting, presorting, and all the rest of the rubbish. Getting out to open houses isn't that great either, b/c they may be schedule on days in which it is impossible to go, and they can be held only seasonally, if that. On top of that, many places are requring pre-registration and invitation only for open houses.

    Another event to chalk up to experience. Generally it's all set up that you have to go through HR, and some managers can get really ***** if applicants don't go this route.

    But remember what I am saying. Mark it down. The tables are turning. You will, soon enough, be in the driver's seat. Get involved in nursing organizations, volunteer, try to pay for your own PALS, ACLS, go to converences and events. Learn, learn, learn, and keep current on things. Bottom line, stay motivated, and don't give up.

    You might even try this technique again, but with a little more insight. It helps to know how things work in a place.

    Some might even try w/ this manager again--say at an event where you might see her. She probably wouldn't remember you. In principle, although it doesn't pay the bills, I would be reluctant to do this, b/c she couldn't even muster some brief courtesy to you.

    OTOH, perhaps there was something earth-shattering going on with her--perhaps even a serious family problem? Who knows? So if I were to approach her again, I think it would be at an event or in a situation that was somehow more relaxed and not intrusive. I wouldn't shove my resume in her face. I would just try to talk with her in general conversation. If I sensed that she was unapproachable and anything near to how she came off when you last saw her, I would politely move on and talk with other people and not bother with her again--not even though electronic application. It helps to get a feel for people, which is hard to do in a fair way in < 2 seconds. But if she behaviors similarly in subsequent encounters, I mean, do you really want to work under this person???? There are always issues in nursing that require manager insight and involvement. It's tough to work your role with managers like this--if that is indeed how she really is

    Always remember, however, that interviewing or "pre-interviewing" goes both ways. You are a valuable person, and respectfulness and courtesy goes both ways. When it doesn't, maybe there are extenuating circumstances, but if it patterns in the negative, you have to ask yourself the hard question of whether or not you could effectively work with this person.

    Don't beat yourself up about it. Cold-calling is tough business. Ask any sales person with this kind of experience.
    Thank you so much for your post. You literally brought me to tears. (haha I guess I'm at my breaking point) I think I am just so frustrated with how things are going and just don't know what else to do anymore. I feel like I would be better off if I would have gone through a BSN program, but I couldn't afford it at the time and now it seems like my applications are overlooked because of it. I actually thought the same thing you mentioned when I left the hospital. I thought to myself that if she was like that with me, does she get like that with her staff? So I consoled myself on my way home saying that I wouldn't want to be a part of a unit or hospital where management acted in that manner.

    I am trying whatever I can to stay current. I have ACLS, BLS, Dysrhythmias, Spanish for Healthcare, and will be attending a few more courses next month. I am hoping it pays off! Oh, and I'm volunteering at various places.

    Many people have landed jobs because they know someone who pushed for them or they had multiple clinical rotations on the unit, but I don't come from a medical/nursing background and although they would like to hire me at the hospital where I completed clinical, they are on a hiring freeze. It's getting hard for me to push on and apply, but I will definitely take note of this experience and move forward.

    Thank you again for your comments!
  12. 2
    Quote from Nurse Connie
    I have heard of several new grads getting job this way. All everyone says is "make yourself stand out", put a face to the resume. Even the nurse recruiter at the hospital I was just hired at told me people who walk into her office have a better chance than those who just e-mail or fax their resume. I admire your courage and I wish you luck!

    Yes, I bet the OP is going to get quite the mix of reviews on this one.

    See but in my roles, as long as it is not obnoxious, I like gonads in a person!

    The tide is going to turn. Be your best and don't give up.

    Geez, half the pharmaceutical companies, regardless of what you think of them, wouldn't be where they are if they didn't have gonads like this. For every 10 persons you cold call, maybe 1-3 will even take a few minutes to speak with you.

    Since 9/11, dynamics have changed with this. Shoot, it's hard to get past security without some kind of appointment.

    I come from a time where it was expected that you had some gonads to be an effective nurse. We can argue whether the OP's approach was "professional" or not, but depending upon what other experts you talk to, that will vary.



    Many of the most successful people in the world were/are quite unconventional!
    Joe33 and Liddle Noodnik like this.


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