i think im going to get fired at my first job

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    A little history about me...I've been licensed for about a year and a half now. I started in ped homecare because I wasn't able to find a job, but finally was hired by a LTC pediatric facility. The first week I had classroom training which went fine. The next week I began with my receptor. My first day the nurse ignored me, didn't teach me much at all and I couldn't find her most of the time. Second day I had a different preceptor because mine wasn't in who put it me with one patient and I did ok. I've now completed 5 shifts and my last shift I had 4 patients and it was definitely a struggle and I wasn't able to do all the work myself because I had meetings. As far as patient care and documentation goes I feel that I'm doing a good job, being a newbie. Well I had a meeting with my nurse manager abd she was extremely unhappy because I'm not with my preceptor enough. She said that I'm supposed to be glued to her hip. She was pretty mad. She is not a nice person, has taking a dislike to me for no reason that I know of. I assumed my preceptor didn't want me to follow her everywhere because she never tells me where she's going, and instead will tell me what to do and not follow me. No one ever told me this. It seems like no one likes me on the unit, as hard as I try to reach out and be nice. I'm also expected to take 7 patients (a whole load) on my 7th shift. Does this sound a little too much for a new grad? Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I should do? My manager gives me dirty looks, is known to be a perfectionist, very hard on her employees. And a bit neurotic. I couldn't live with myself if I got fired from my first job! It's not looking good the way she speaks to me. I am trying so hard and I feel like it's for nothing.
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  4. 2
    Ok...

    One thing you have to do, is be able to be involved with your preceptorship; your manager is right, you need to be glued to their hip, or at least speak up when you can't find your preceptor.

    Also, look on all nurses for some brain sheets and tailor your needs for your pt population and workload.

    As far as personalities; unless you have an actual person setting outright "I hate you", it may be your hackles going for it. Speak up for yourself and since you know that your NM's expectations are for perfection, ask further how you can reach a more "perfect" nursing practice; get to know what the expectation is and what YOUR expectations are...STOP trying to be "nice" to your coworkers an solicit their input and assistance in things you don't know...trying to be "nice" make look like NOT asking for help and how able to communicate effectively, thus giving the perception that you are having difficulty hacking it, as well as someone who may need assistance when a pts needs help and will possibly increase a pts mortality; remember, perception IS REALITY when one is new, remember that.

    Sending positive vibes on your success.
    Here.I.Stand and ceebeejay like this.
  5. 3
    If she wants you glued then you should tell the preceptor she wants you glued and be glued. You want the job, you gotta fight for it. When you go home, think about your day, write down the areas you did well and then write about areas that you need to improve and have a plan for the next day. If you don't understand some area, learn more. Don't try to be "nice", be professional and expect the same. Your professional survival is what you are out for. Not saying to be rude, but don't be the wall flower either. You learned the skills, now you have to apply them in real practice. You won't be able to do the 7 patient load if you have no idea what your preceptor was doing when you weren't with her. If she needs a break, she should tell you; I am sure it can be annoying to have someone to be responsible for all day, but that's nursing!
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    My preceptor is there every time (almost) I give meds, start feedings, and assess patients, unfortunately the manager hasn't seen that because she's not on the unit. I document on my own and the nurse checks over it later and I've been doing well. The preceptor hasn't made an effort to befriend me so it's a very awkward relationship. She has made it clear that she doesn't want to do be my teacher as she just got done with someone else. I am going to tell her that we need to be together every minute whether useful or not and as far taking care of 7 patients...I know the routine however i just feel I don't have enough days in yet to take her full load. What I feel the most is that my manager and the nurses don't want me there and I've felt that from day 1. It seems like a very miserable work place.
  7. 1
    Quote from rsbirdie
    My preceptor is there every time (almost) I give meds, start feedings, and assess patients, unfortunately the manager hasn't seen that because she's not on the unit. I document on my own and the nurse checks over it later and I've been doing well.
    If you are doing well, then maybe you need to be discussing the actual perception, especially with your manager.

    The preceptor hasn't made an effort to befriend me so it's a very awkward relationship.
    Maybe it's me, but I think you should not be concerned to "befriend" your preceptor; it's a means to an end of this "relationship". The matter is that you need to demonstrate competence; that garners you respect; an IMHO, respect is far better than being "befriended".

    She has made it clear that she doesn't want to do be my teacher as she just got done with someone else. I am going to tell her that we need to be together every minute whether useful or not and as far taking care of 7 patients...I know the routine however i just feel I don't have enough days in yet to take her full load. What I feel the most is that my manager and the nurses don't want me there and I've felt that from day 1. It seems like a very miserable work place.
    And again, I cannot assess that because I'm not there; however, again, the perception of you, plus what you think about the workload can be presenting a particular perception that can be erased IF you show competency; that's going to save you your job.

    You are also new, and you may feel an intense need to "fit in"; the most important thing to do is focus in your nursing practice and get confidence. So, make sure you are advocating for yourself, grab a brain sheet on AN (use the search engine on here and you will find threads with brain sheets) and tailor it to your workload-trust me it will IMPROVE your current practice and give you a way to organize and be able to handle the workload that you are faced with.

    Keep working and be confident; speak up and as long as you respect your nursing practice an competence; everything else will fall into place.

    Best wishes.
    SlightlyHumerus likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from rsbirdie
    My first day the nurse ignored me, didn't teach me much at all and I couldn't find her most of the time. Second day I had a different preceptor because mine wasn't in who put it me with one patient and I did ok.

    I've now completed 5 shifts and my last shift I had 4 patients and it was definitely a struggle and I wasn't able to do all the work myself because I had meetings. As far as patient care and documentation goes I feel that I'm doing a good job, being a newbie.

    Well I had a meeting with my nurse manager abd she was extremely unhappy because I'm not with my preceptor enough. She said that I'm supposed to be glued to her hip. She was pretty mad. She is not a nice person, has taking a dislike to me for no reason that I know of.

    I assumed my preceptor didn't want me to follow her everywhere because she never tells me where she's going, and instead will tell me what to do and not follow me. No one ever told me this. It seems like no one likes me on the unit, as hard as I try to reach out and be nice. I'm also expected to take 7 patients (a whole load) on my 7th shift.

    Does this sound a little too much for a new grad? Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I should do? My manager gives me dirty looks, is known to be a perfectionist, very hard on her employees. And a bit neurotic. I couldn't live with myself if I got fired from my first job! It's not looking good the way she speaks to me. I am trying so hard and I feel like it's for nothing.
    First, not every preceptor WANTS to be a preceptor or is a good one. You're finding that out for yourself. Sometimes you just have to take the bull by the horns and ASK them for what you need. It's your orientation, after all. If you're not getting what you need, sit down and ask the preceptor.

    As far as your meeting with your manager, it's not going to be to your advantage to make assumptions about your manager "taking a dislike to me" or to dwell on whether or not she's a nice person. It doesn't matter whether she's a nice person or not; she's the manager. You have to do things her way. So if that means that you track down your preceptor and stay glued to her hip, that's what you do. And as far as whether or not she likes you -- you may just be too sensitive. Same with the other nurses -- how do you know they don't like you? They don't spout rainbows and skittles when you appear? Maybe they're just stressed. Or shy.

    You don't gain anything positive by assuming that no one likes you, so don't make that assumption. Assume that they do like you. That will make it easier for you to interact with them.

    I see an awful lot of feelings and assumptions in your post; not too many facts.
    SlightlyHumerus and Here.I.Stand like this.
  9. 3
    It sounds like this environment is not very conducive to learning. When I was going through my training as a new grad (just two years ago), my managers were constantly asking me, "How is your preceptor?" "Is she/he a good match for you?" "Do you feel ready to take two patients next week?" (Working in ICU), "Do you need more time? " And they were 100% willing to GIVE me more time, if needed. They really listened to me and wanted me to learn. Management knows when they hire a new nurse that it is going to take A LOT of effort and time to train you. If they want their new hire (you) to become a competent nurse who is going to represent their unit well then they need to provide the tools for you to do so. A new grad knows little to nothing about real, practical nursing and that is to be expected. (I know you are not necessarily a new grad but since it is your first hospital experience, that's what I'm comparing it to ).

    I know everyone says, "She doesn't have to befriend you"; or "Maybe she doesn't even want to be a preceptor". But, in your defense: hellooo you are a new staff member on this unit! The unit should welcome you and treat you like their coworker...because that is what you are! They should want to take you under their wing and show you the ropes. This unwelcoming attitude is a common theme in nursing practice, but that topic is a whole different discussion in itself .

    With that said, I'll be honest. I think that you just have to make the best of the situation. You got the job! That's more than a lot of licensed nurses can say. And like everyone on this thread has said, it's YOUR career. Take charge of the opportunity. Follow your preceptor and try as best you can to be engaged, even if she does ignore you. If you don't feel ready to take seven patients, be honest with your manager. You will never regret taking a little more time to learn, even if it makes your feel slow or behind at first. And truthfully, a good manager will not hold that against you. Getting a "nurse brain" and organizing your day is half the battle. You will eventually get your own routine down, and I guarantee a few months down the road you will look back and laugh at how stressed you were during orientation!


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