Discrimination Against Ethnic/Minority Names - page 2

No matter how many self-righteous managers and nurses might deny it, there is still plenty of discrimination against job hunters with ethnic names. All you have to do is Google to find plenty of... Read More

  1. Visit  ablpn} profile page
    0
    No I don't asume all white people are racist. I have white people all through my family.I dont agree with anyone who encourages race warfare. I worship with white people, mexican, asian ect. Not only that but these people are my friends and we are at each others homes as real spiritual brothers and sisters. their children have spent many a night at my house and mine at theirs.But some of them have been disowned by their families because they stooped so low as to befriend a black person. I have several cousins who are married to white southerners. My husbands grandfather is white. And MY grandfather, My dad's father, is white. He and my grandmother had 14 children. But even they are discriminated against for marrying into black families. I'm not stupid. I know that all white people are not predjudice. Bu i'm not naive either. Even dogs have more sense than racist people, white or black. When have you seen a black dog only wanting to be around other black dogs or a white dog only wanting to be around other white dogs? I am saying that racism in the medical field does exist. Thats what I'm saying.
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  3. Visit  HM-8404} profile page
    1
    Quote from ablpn
    Unfortunately this is very true! If you are not a minority, you may not understand. I am from the south and have witnessed applications being thrown in the trash can of people with ethnic names specifically African American names. They may not throw out one that says "Chang" but they will certainly throw out a "LaQuisha" or "Martavion". Lets face it folks, predjudice and racism still exist and in some places its on the rise. It is sad but its true. I have found that in my area, I have to really be on top of my game and work extra hard because of my race in order to get positions that my white counterparts are applying for.
    Ummm... You witnessed someone in HR throw applications in the trash only because they had "African-American" names on them? The person in HR told you, an African-American, that was the reason they were being thrown away? I don't know what to think. My first thought is what kind of idiot do you work for? Someone that is trying to set them-self up for a lawsuit, or perhaps you just ASSUMED that is why they were thrown away.

    I read a study years ago in Sociology about racial bias and by far the most biased people were educated blacks against less educated blacks.
    BuckyBadgerRN likes this.
  4. Visit  HM-8404} profile page
    2
    Quote from Jeweles26
    Oh, I'm sorry. I know this might not be very PC, but racism is racism, no matter who it is against. And white people are not the only people who can be racist, just like they can be discriminated against. You assume that white Southerners are racist? Do you think maybe that is racist, assuming that just based on the color of their skin and their geographical location? What about African American preachers who encourage race warfare? Racism works for everyone you know. Offering positions and scholarships based on the color of your skin is wrong, and I HAVE seen it many times, not intended for white people.
    ...and sexism is sexism. When I was searching for scholarships the VAST majority I found were for minorities and women. If you were a female minority you had it made. There were more scholarships than you would be able to apply for. Do a google search for scholarships for single mothers then do one for single fathers and see how big of a disparity there is.
    eklecticsol and Szasz_is_Right like this.
  5. Visit  uRNmyway} profile page
    1
    Quote from HM-8404
    ...and sexism is sexism. When I was searching for scholarships the VAST majority I found were for minorities and women. If you were a female minority you had it made. There were more scholarships than you would be able to apply for. Do a google search for scholarships for single mothers then do one for single fathers and see how big of a disparity there is.
    Yup, I totally agree with you. I think in the interest of making things "fair", we have made things the complete opposite of it. When not everyone is eligible to have the same things, with all other things being equal except for race/age/gender/etc.. that is considered NOT fair. What should matter is our need, our skills, our abilities. Not the color of our skin, how many birthdays we have had or the dangly thing between our legs.

    Pardon my bluntness, but this topic really grinds my gears.
    HM-8404 likes this.
  6. Visit  Ruby Vee} profile page
    2
    Quote from HouTx
    My ethnicity is WASP - but I agree with the OP. In fact, it is such an "open secret" that I know of three people in my grad school classes who anglicized their first names for professional reasons. One of my current colleagues (African American) legally changed her first name when she was pursuing her doctorate in public health after being advised to do so by an influential professor.

    I do know that having an unusual or weird first name is a real disadvantage in some professions because it detracts from the gravitas that they need to project. Can you imagine a Supreme Court Justice named Moonbeam or Apple?

    I have no solution - wish I did.
    The only Apple I know of has a blonde, blue eyed mother. Not sure if we're discussing racism or "alternative names."
    citylights89 and Crux1024 like this.
  7. Visit  BrandonLPN} profile page
    2
    I will agree that this does still happen this day and age, even though it shouldn't. I'm sure a lot of it is subconscious on the part of the hiring manager. But it happens all the same.

    Since black parents know what kind of discrimination is out there, I can't help but wonder why they name their daughters names like "Sharika" or "Latonja". It's their right, for sure. And they should be able to embrace their own culture. But the fact remains that those names carry certain connotations, whether we like it or not. Why would you limit your child that way, fair or unfair?
    eklecticsol and citylights89 like this.
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    3
    Quote from ablpn
    Unfortunately this is very true! If you are not a minority, you may not understand. I am from the south and have witnessed applications being thrown in the trash can of people with ethnic names specifically African American names. They may not throw out one that says "Chang" but they will certainly throw out a "LaQuisha" or "Martavion".
    *** My question is why would any parent give their child a name (like those mentioned above) that will certainly put them at a disadvantage in life?
  9. Visit  needshaldol} profile page
    0
    I work in a city that is probably about 70% white and yet I (white) am often a minority amongst the nurses. I find that fact interesting and have no clue as to why. Thus I do not see racial discrimination where I work unless I am the one being discriminated against? I don't think so.
  10. Visit  misstgo} profile page
    2
    @brandonlpn that's not a 'culture thing', that's a 'ghetto thing' lol. I completely agree with you though. When I had my son, I gave him a name that wouldn't tell his ethnic background. Sad but true. *shrugs shoulder* the point is racism will never end. I have been called the 'n' word so many times by people I have never met. Especially when I play xbox online with my husband. I can always expect to be called a 'ni***r' at least 3 times. Smh......
    eklecticsol and citylights89 like this.
  11. Visit  needshaldol} profile page
    2
    agree with misstgo. Racism is here. So as said, my hospital is probably 20% white staff and the rest a mixture, mostly asian. I hardly ever hear racist remarks. I have been doing this a long time and only twice have heard it. The last time was a shocker. I walked into a room and the white patient family said to me "Oh how nice, a white nurse". That was a first! Is that racist? On their parts? Probably somewhat but I get mixed up these days. I did not know what to say other than "we are a very diverse great group of nurses".
    SHGR and NRSKarenRN like this.
  12. Visit  FionaA} profile page
    0
    I'm assuming most of the posters here are from the US? I live in Canada, specifically in the city of Toronto. Over half our population are non-white "minorities" if you can call it minority at all. The nursing profession especially, whites are the minority, I've been on past units where white nurses make up maybe like 10%. Most are filipino, black, or some kind of south or east asian. I'm surprised to hear about this discrimination still existing, guess it really depends on location as well maybe.
  13. Visit  TrophyWife} profile page
    3
    Quote from misstgo
    that's not a 'culture thing', that's a 'ghetto thing'
    Ha, ha, ha Misstgo keep it 100! I was very intentional in choosing my son's name. No mid-name apostrophes, no random capital letters, and nothing ending in 'quon' for goodness sakes! As much as it pained me, I even went with a traditional spelling. Not as much fun, but for me, as a parent, it was the right thing to do. NO, it shouldn't have to be that way, but it IS and I'm not going to let my kid pay the price because I want to fight the system.
  14. Visit  BrandonLPN} profile page
    1
    A little off topic, but I don't get the appeal of "trendy" names like Madison or Dakota or Kaylee. These names won't be trendy forever. "Agnes" and "Reginald" were trendy names once upon a time. Now they are associated with being really, really old. Seventy years from now, Madison and Dakota will be associated with being old, too.
    sharpeimom likes this.


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