Confused on what does PRN Mean??? Need Help on Understanding It Please!!

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    Hi, I need help on understanding what does it mean when a job states PRN. I am having trouble on getting any calls for interviews for many full time positions I have applied for. I have recently saw this new grad RN position, but had PRN to the side. I want to know what does a PRN schedule look like, how much will pay be like is it going to be less then full time pay? Because I want to relocate but I want to make sure I can make enough money to help pay for apartment and other expenses. I really want a job and start my nursing career , but I am not sure if I should apply to this PRN position or just wait and look for a full time one. Any information on working as a PRN will be helpful.

    Thanks
  2. 5 Comments so far...

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    That's something to ask during the interview, because it really depends on both the workplace in question and your own availability. Some may have as much work as you can handle, others may have very little available.

    Schedule is also going to vary. Sometimes you might know well in advance when you'll be working (eg. filling in for someone taking a vacation), other times you'll likely be called at the last minute when someone calls in sick, census increases, or something else brings on a sudden need for more people. In general, you're free to say yes or no, so you can still schedule your own things (though the more reliable you are, the more you're likely to be called),.

    Often (but not always) PRN gets paid more hourly than someone scheduled, but generally works less hours.

    My personal concern as a new grad was that I wouldn't get enough orientation as PRN to be able to get my feet under me. However, if it's specifically advertised as a new grad position, perhaps that's not a problem.

    Beyond that, I don't think it can hurt to apply. Even if you're not making as much as full time (which you probably won't), it's better than nothing, and if you're not getting enough hours you'll still have time to look for jobs. It also gets your foot in the door at that facility and should give you access to internal job openings.
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    Prn means ass needed. They will call you when hours are available that you are able to work. Some places will have a lot of hours available and some places are slow. Prn positions pay more but that is because there arent any benefits.
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    Maybe you should apply but also keep your current job to gain experience and maybe you will pick up hrs. There might also be a possibility that they would give you a full time position when available.
  6. 0
    Quote from jes07
    Hi, I need help on understanding what does it mean when a job states PRN. I am having trouble on getting any calls for interviews for many full time positions I have applied for. I have recently saw this new grad RN position, but had PRN to the side. I want to know what does a PRN schedule look like, how much will pay be like is it going to be less then full time pay? Because I want to relocate but I want to make sure I can make enough money to help pay for apartment and other expenses. I really want a job and start my nursing career , but I am not sure if I should apply to this PRN position or just wait and look for a full time one. Any information on working as a PRN will be helpful.

    Thanks
    Just as an aside PRN is short for the Latin phrase Pro re nata which translates "in the circumstances" or "as circumstances needed".

    Originally used for orders by physicians where it directed a nurse or care giver to administer a med based upon their own judgment. However in your case and for nurse staffing it simply means you will be called for duty as needed.
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    PRN does not have to mean part time hours, it mainly just mean you don't get benefits. Many people who work PRN or as resource nurses get close to fulltime hours, they just do not have the benefits that come with fulltime employment. It is a great way for new grads to get experience though!


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