Any new grads having major employment problems? - page 4

by lsid16

6,435 Views | 36 Comments

I graduated in May 2012 with an ADN. I moved from Illinois to Texas for better job prospects. I've applied for 50 jobs and have heard nothing. Plus, I'm applying to other minimum wage jobs just to have an income. I keep getting... Read More


  1. 0
    We had no recruiters from LTC or SNF's. Wonder how much the hospitals get from the government, for their "new grad residency" programs?
  2. 1
    Quote from joanna73
    For real. I was 37 when I finished my BSN, and living on my own. I would never be able to afford to volunteer without full time income. I took the first job offer I received. I had a job before I wrote my RN exam, and relocated for the job. Best investment I could have made.
    I took the first job offer I got, too. But it took 3 months to get. I worked as a tutor for pay in the meantime and volunteered along with that. The time commitment was pretty minimal for the volunteering but it definitely paid off.
    joanna73 likes this.
  3. 0
    Funny, I was a nurse for many years, took time off to travel, and then took a refresher course. I did my refresher course clinical at a major teaching hospital. (It's really not a hospital, it's more like a city unto itself.) I got a 92% from my preceptor. This was on a unit that called itself med-surg, but was really a step-down telemetry.

    The only job I could get after that was in a long term care facility on the skilled nursing wing. The ratios were unsafe and we had to manually (paper) chart and then computer chart everything, all over again. Overtime was met with derision and complaints by management that we had poor time-management skills.

    I hated the DON so much at that place. She hovered just so she could bust us for miniscule infractions.

    Now I work with dogs and cats, some of which need meds (phenobarbital, steroids, anti-stress). It's astonishing the variety of pet food these days too. My clients are animals and I couldn't be happier. The pay is not so great though.
  4. 2
    Its all about the area you live in. I've heard the east coast is the best place to land a job in the nursing market. Well, for this year anyway.
    joanna73 and Meriwhen like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from lsid16
    I graduated in May 2012 with an ADN. I moved from Illinois to Texas for better job prospects. I've applied for 50 jobs and have heard nothing. Plus, I'm applying to other minimum wage jobs just to have an income. I keep getting the "overqualified" speech, and can't land a minimum wage job. I'm about to lose my mind. Anybody else having these employment issues?
    The question should be which new grads are not having problems finding work?

    The vast majority of them are having problems.
  6. 0
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Sure, but you could investigate nursing fairly well and still come up with tons of articles and advice from sources that seem pretty reputable that don't hint at all about the struggle new grads have finding jobs. Allnurses covers it a lot, but not everyone finds their way here. I think even the DOL website talks about job growth and positive job outlook for nurses. And when you're researching, which is supposed to be the more reliable source: aggovernment sponsored site with labor statistics, or a web forum? I can understand how nursing students get duped and it's not necessarily due to lack of research.
    You have a good point, but I guess this is where I differ from most people. I would most definitely trust a nurses' discussion forum over the dept. of labor's website. Who knows more about being a nurse then, well, nurses? Sometimes anecdotal information is worth WAY more than official or academic information.
  7. 1
    Quote from leckzieloo
    Its all about the area you live in. I've heard the east coast is the best place to land a job in the nursing market. Well, for this year anyway.
    I live in New England and jobs are not abundant here.
    TheCommuter likes this.


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