Any new grads having major employment problems? - page 3

I graduated in May 2012 with an ADN. I moved from Illinois to Texas for better job prospects. I've applied for 50 jobs and have heard nothing. Plus, I'm applying to other minimum wage jobs just to have an income. I keep getting... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Jobs are heavily shifting away from the traditional hospital setting that everyone wants and moving to subacute, LTC and home care. And since these areas are, to say the least, viewed by many new grads as "lesser" jobs, it creates a skewed view that there are too many nurses.
    Yes. Many, if not most, new grads are chasing after the exalted job at their local acute care hospital. The cold, hard reality is that hospital length of stays are decreasing, patient census has slowly been dropping, and many acute procedures have been shifted to settings outside the hospital.

    LTC, rehab, home health, private duty, and subacute are the waves of the future because these settings provide more cost-effective care than inpatient acute care hospitals. Therefore, we have an ever-increasing pool of new nurses chasing after fewer and fewer hospital jobs.
    GeneralJinjur likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    Oh, you are so right (teenytinybabyRN). SNF and LTC and home care do have revolving doors of employment opportunities. Too bad nursing school doesn't reveal this little secret until students find out that not everyone is going to get a hospital job.
  3. 0
    Here's an interesting-ish article from the Seattle Times:

    http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2017720619_nurses11.html

    I
    t's a concise article, and if you read well, you'll discover part of the problem lies in what I call "nurse mills"...colleges that have received millions in taxpayer $$ through Federal and State funding to expand programs, begin programs and increase enrollment.

    WorkSource (unemployment) is geared to shuttle displaced workers into "high demand" careers.

    WorkSource can now pat itself on the back for a job well done in alleviating the nursing "shortage."

    This has provided a glut of nurses on the market making it an employer's market. Supply and demand, supply and demand-- remains as true today as it ever did.

    In my area, new grads and those with 1-3 years experience are flying in the door, and displacing nurses who have put in eight or more years are booted to the curb. Why keep the expensive, tenured nurses when you have a cheaper "food source" beating down your doors?

    I feel for new grads but not too much so. One of you has my job right now (I was laid off with a "thank you for your excellent service" letter) and I'm in the position of potentially losing everything I've worked for because the market here is incredibly tight.

    A few years ago I interviewed in a remote, mountain town. I was offered a paltry wage because...that tiny town had been given a grant to have a local extension program from that state's university, for a nurse factory. To think, a town of 15,000 year round residents, was given a "college" for nursing. They now have a steady supply of cheap labor.

    And shall we talk about insourcing??? Dirty little secret, that.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Oct 13, '12 : Reason: TOS
  4. 1
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    No, but it helps you network and makes your application stand out, which can help you get a job, which WILL pay the bills. My volunteer experience as well as my active membership in a professional nursing organization were cited as things that made me look like a real go-getter and good potential employee by the folks who ended up hiring me.
    I can vouch for that. Volunteering while hunting for that new grad job opened interview doors, and I was told more than once by NMs that they were impressed that I was out doing something instead of doing nothing.

    And just as importantly, I felt good about myself and what I was doing.

    Volunteering doesn't pay the bills--that is technically accurate. It can pay off in other ways though.
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  5. 0
    If you are serious about getting started with your nursing carer you must look outside the major metropolitan areas. Look in remote rural areas and you'll see that some of these hospitals take new grads. Yes this is the new reality and you will have to get out of your comfort zone if you want a job. Yes there are new grad programs but every six months your chances are smaller. In the country they will appreciate you but the big city will make you feel like you are worthless.

    Will this change? Yes but it could take years...best of luck
  6. 3
    Quote from Guttercat
    Here's an interesting-ish article from the Seattle Times:

    http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2017720619_nurses11.html

    I
    t's a concise article, and if you read well, you'll discover part of the problem lies in what I call "nurse mills"...colleges that have received millions in taxpayer $$ through Federal and State funding to expand programs, begin programs and increase enrollment.

    WorkSource (unemployment) is geared to shuttle displaced workers into "high demand" careers.

    WorkSource can now pat itself on the back for a job well done in alleviating the nursing "shortage."

    This has provided a glut of nurses on the market making it an employer's market. Supply and demand, supply and demand-- remains as true today as it ever did.

    In my area, new grads and those with 1-3 years experience are flying in the door, and displacing nurses who have put in eight or more years are booted to the curb. Why keep the expensive, tenured nurses when you have a cheaper "food source" beating down your doors?

    I feel for new grads but not too much so. One of you has my job right now (I was laid off with a "thank you for your excellent service" letter) and I'm in the position of potentially losing everything I've worked for because the market here is incredibly tight.

    A few years ago I interviewed in a remote, mountain town. I was offered a paltry wage because...that tiny town had been given a grant to have a local extension program from that state's university, for a nurse factory. To think, a town of 15,000 year round residents, was given a "college" for nursing. They now have a steady supply of cheap labor.

    And shall we talk about insourcing??? Dirty little secret, that.
    The market is abysmal right now. I too know of many seasoned nurses "let go" or fired after stellar careers that cannot find another position. I can't blame the new grads for the amoral behavior of the facilities. I can't blame the new grads for the greedy nursing mills.

    Everyone is hurting. I blame big business and corporate greed.
    Guttercat, BrandonLPN, and not.done.yet like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from WanderingSagehen
    Oh, you are so right (teenytinybabyRN). SNF and LTC and home care do have revolving doors of employment opportunities. Too bad nursing school doesn't reveal this little secret until students find out that not everyone
    is going to get a hospital job.
    But, to be fair, students should investigate local job markets
    themselves *before* taking on such a debt/commitment. The big flashing cartoon dollar signs in the recuiter's eyes was my first clue they might not be 100% trustworthy.
    Guttercat and joanna73 like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    But, to be fair, students should investigate local job marketsthemselves *before* taking on such a debt/commitment. The big flashing cartoon dollar signs in the recuiter's eyes was my first clue they might not be 100% trustworthy.
    Sure, but you could investigate nursing fairly well and still come up with tons of articles and advice from sources that seem pretty reputable that don't hint at all about the struggle new grads have finding jobs. Allnurses covers it a lot, but not everyone finds their way here. I think even the DOL website talks about job growth and positive job outlook for nurses. And when you're researching, which is supposed to be the more reliable source: aggovernment sponsored site with labor statistics, or a web forum? I can understand how nursing students get duped and it's not necessarily due to lack of research.
  9. 0
    Quote from rhagan
    volunteering don't pay the bills. Am just saying
    For real. I was 37 when I finished my BSN, and living on my own. I would never be able to afford to volunteer without full time income. I took the first job offer I received. I had a job before I wrote my RN exam, and relocated for the job. Best investment I could have made.
  10. 0
    Wow- thanks for sharing. I hadn't heard of the situation put in those terms. Yes, many (too many) new grads are out looking for jobs and we are willing to work for less because we know how slim the chances are that we will get employment. I work my tail off at my job with this same fear that I must work harder than ever. Hopefully the economy will improve and all of us nurses will be needed and we can all just get along and be one big happy family.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top