Would like to know

  1. I am a BSN that has degenative arthritis so can't work in the hospital setting anymore, I would like to know if anyone knows what steps I would need to take to become a nurse educator possibly in the community college area with LPN/LVN. I am currently working at a minimum wage job answering phones thought I could help with the nursing shortage by becoming a teacher. Would love anyone's thoughts about this subject.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Leda
    The first thing you need to do is to check with your state board of registration in nursing to determine the educational criteria for LPN/LVN educators. Typically a BSN is acceptable, but there may also be additional educational and experiential criteria your state requires. Given that you meet the criteria for an LPN/LVN educator you can then contact programs in your area to determine if there are any faculty vacancies.

    You might consider exploring employment opportunities as a clinical laboratory (nursing skills) instructor. In many states the BSN is the minimum level of education for this position. Because of your physical limitations this may be a better fit for you. Clinical nursing education requires a great deal of physical activity (lot's of walking on the clinical unit). You have a clinical group of 6 to 10 students with between 1 and 3 patients each. This involves a lot of physical activity and can be far more physically taxing than typical hospital nursing.

    Your education and experience can certainly open doors for you in nursing education. Best of luck to you.
  4. by   purplemania
    I concur. Get on the phone or travel to the schools to talk to the Dean/Director. You might even consider hospital education departments (although I do a fair amount of walking and standing and lifting equipment). Hospitals and other facilities also need nurses in case management and utilization review, although these require certain background experiences and sometimes certifications. My friend is a BSN working for an insurance company. It is her job to make sure the complaint and the paperwork match and to help the patient utilize resources appropriately. So look around. You have choices!
  5. by   SFCardiacRN
    Teaching is very physical. Standing all day in front of a classroom. Chasing a dozen students around clinicals. If you need a desk job, I would look elsewhere.
  6. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from sfcardiacrn
    teaching is very physical. standing all day in front of a classroom. chasing a dozen students around clinicals. if you need a desk job, i would look elsewhere.
    [font="comic sans ms"]i have to agree with that. every instructor starts out in clinicals, then works their way into lecturing. lecturing wouldn't be too bad on the bones, but the trip there (up the ladder i mean) may hurt.

    what about something administrative (not necessarily management), like in homecare (in the office), coordination/case management?
  7. by   pvjerrys
    Quote from icubear
    I am a BSN that has degenative arthritis so can't work in the hospital setting anymore, I would like to know if anyone knows what steps I would need to take to become a nurse educator possibly in the community college area with LPN/LVN. I am currently working at a minimum wage job answering phones thought I could help with the nursing shortage by becoming a teacher. Would love anyone's thoughts about this subject.
    Our school has policy of "fitness" for both faculty & student. There must be a minimum limit of how much they can lift, etc.

    Other suggestions for you: Discharge planning, Risk management, Infection control, Case management.
    Nursing is one profession that one can find an eventual niche, thank goodness!
  8. by   proRN
    I disagree that we should focus on the physical abilities/limitations in nursing or nursing education. Nursing is first and foremost knowledge work. As a person with some physical disability I would apply for the position you want to do (we desperately need educators) and ask for accomodations. Do not let employers discriminate, you have what matters most: nursing knowledge. At our college the science lab manager is in a wheelchair and he does very well at his job.

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