Why Does Nursing Eat Its Young? - page 2

I first heard this statement 20+ years ago from a nursing colleague. Recently, I heard it again from a professor in my graduate program. And, 30 years in the health field have shown me that it's TRUE... Read More

  1. by   susanmary
    Chas: Enjoyed your insightful and meaningful post. Hope every nurse reads it! It's true that we are responsible for our actions. Nurses that eat their own, nurses that are mean spirited and hell bent on hurting other nurses are, I'm certain, the same way outside the workplace. We all own our actions and behaviors. We can continue to work on ourselves and be positive role models for nursing -- we can't control others actions/behaviors -- only our own. I know it's a cliche, but a little kindness goes a long way. Have a great day.
  2. by   Charles S. Smith, RN, MS
    Originally posted by susanmary:
    Chas: Enjoyed your insightful and meaningful post. Hope every nurse reads it! It's true that we are responsible for our actions. Nurses that eat their own, nurses that are mean spirited and hell bent on hurting other nurses are, I'm certain, the same way outside the workplace. We all own our actions and behaviors. We can continue to work on ourselves and be positive role models for nursing -- we can't control others actions/behaviors -- only our own. I know it's a cliche, but a little kindness goes a long way. Have a great day.
    It is never a cliche to speak truth SusanMary..great insight!! The Golden Rule still applies in my life....and i sense it does in yours!
    Thanx
    chas


    [This message has been edited by Charles S. Smith, RN, MS (edited January 30, 2001).]
  3. by   Natalie25
    Some people are mean spirited. We women allow gossiping to get way out of hand. If you here nurses talk trash about another nurse, you have to assume that someone is going to talk trash about you. It's not just nurses. You have a responsibility to not engage in that kind of trash talking. Don't act like you're interested and don't feed the fire. Sooner or later, most of the trash talkers will get the message. Especially if you confront them on it or address the general problem at a staff meeting.

    In the ER I work in, trash talking is kept at a minimum and the general working environment is wonderful here. In fact, I love my job here! And I have worked in a few different areas. Teamwork = Job satisfaction!! Love and Respect eachother as if you were part of a big family :-)
  4. by   EMT_125
    Hello all. I am an EMT-B and just started as a PCT. I will be starting nursing school next spring. I have found that a few nurses are cold or indifferent towards me and other EMT's. At first I was kinda put off by this. I have made it a point that no matter how cold, mean, or indifferent a nurse is to me, I will still smile at him/her and wish them a great night. Well, wouldn't you know it, after a couple of weeks of this, they actually go out of their way to say hi, and they all seem to be really nice to me now. I feel that as long as you do your job, don't get the "I know it all" attitude, and be friendly to them no matter what, you will get the same in return. And most importantly, you won't be one of the eaten.


    ------------------
    Don't meddle in the affairs of dragons. You are crunchy and go good with ketchup.
  5. by   canoehead
    I hope that the student that was too busy to take the vital signs does not berate the nurse when she is too busy to answer a question.

    I'm surprised the inappropriateness of this response by the student is even a question.
  6. by   tonie
    I am a second year ADN student in North Carolina. After reading these posts, I don't feel all of the fault lies with the experienced nurses. A lot depends on the attitude of the new nurse or student in the situation. New people have to realize that they are going into a situation where the ground rules are already pretty well established. Too many students go into a clinical area with one of two attitudes: either I know it all and don't need your help, or they go hide in a corner and hope to melt into the wood work. If all students could go into the clinical arena with a learning and helpful attitude, many problems could be circumvented all together.
  7. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by EMT_125:
    <STRONG>Hello all. I am an EMT-B and just started as a PCT. I will be starting nursing school next spring. I have found that a few nurses are cold or indifferent towards me and other EMT's. At first I was kinda put off by this. I have made it a point that no matter how cold, mean, or indifferent a nurse is to me, I will still smile at him/her and wish them a great night. Well, wouldn't you know it, after a couple of weeks of this, they actually go out of their way to say hi, and they all seem to be really nice to me now. I feel that as long as you do your job, don't get the "I know it all" attitude, and be friendly to them no matter what, you will get the same in return. And most importantly, you won't be one of the eaten.


    </STRONG>
    Totally agree!
  8. by   res04lly
    EMT-125 you have found the secret to stopping the eating of our young. I have been around nursing close to 25 years first as an aide and then as an LPN. In the 16 years i have seen alot of eating but it has to do alot with attitude. As someone new to the field of nursing the biggest benefit you have is to Listen to what your mentor is saying to you. Listening is a form of respect and that you are hearing what is being said by acknowledgement. I have read many posts on this bb and the mentors are frustrated because they can not get the feedback that they need to know that they are truely getting the job done that management has given them. I believe that if you respect someones experience and knowledge base that pretty much takes care of the eating, it is when the individual feels that the person being mentor is not Hearing them based on not listening that the problem of Eating comes into play. Years ago i learned to listen, i worked with the mentally ill and i had to listen, really listen to what it was they were saying because they talked to me from their world,and i would get my peices of information as they chose to give it to me. I took that and used this listening concept especially in any new job that i have taken and I have not been eaten.
  9. by   res04lly
    To add an addition to my previous posts, We as nurses MUST stop the nursing schools from telling the new student We eat our young.I remember being told that my first day of school and it is really intimadating and it sets up a US verus Them type responce. As Nursing Educators you can stop this right at the very get go by not telling this to your students, they have enough on their plates without worrying if someone will eat them. I feel that is a cruel statement to use to put fear or intimadation into a student. They will be less willing to ask questions and be less eager to learn if this statement is in the back of their mind. I also think the positive and negative aspects of the job should also be taught-that we don't have 2-3 patients, some nights i have 10 and they have multiple problems not just one or two. give them the benefit of knowing what they are walking into before they go threw the program and then realize this is Not what I thought it would be, or this not like i learned in school. The educators of this profession could really help the profession by being really honest and then the students don't have culture shock when they walk into a nursing home and have 15-30 patients they are responsible for, or go to the hospital and have 8-10 really sick people. As an Educator you can stop the cycle before it begins.
  10. by   fiestynurse
    I have never understood exactly what "eating your young" means. I have not witnessed this as being that prevalent. What we do to our old is much worse!!
  11. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by res04lly:
    <STRONG>To add an addition to my previous posts, We as nurses MUST stop the nursing schools from telling the new student We eat our young.I remember being told that my first day of school and it is really intimadating and it sets up a US verus Them type responce. As Nursing Educators you can stop this right at the very get go by not telling this to your students, they have enough on their plates without worrying if someone will eat them. I feel that is a cruel statement to use to put fear or intimadation into a student. They will be less willing to ask questions and be less eager to learn if this statement is in the back of their mind. I also think the positive and negative aspects of the job should also be taught-that we don't have 2-3 patients, some nights i have 10 and they have multiple problems not just one or two. give them the benefit of knowing what they are walking into before they go threw the program and then realize this is Not what I thought it would be, or this not like i learned in school. The educators of this profession could really help the profession by being really honest and then the students don't have culture shock when they walk into a nursing home and have 15-30 patients they are responsible for, or go to the hospital and have 8-10 really sick people. As an Educator you can stop the cycle before it begins.</STRONG>
    15-30 pts! Where? Here I have had up to 50 pts at one time and even as an experienced nurse it is a shock!
  12. by   kennedyj
    I think it also varies according to specialty. I worked a med surge and peds floor as a nursing student in colorado springs where many nurses ate their yong especially on the peds floor.

    However at a private birthing center and in the trauma center everyone functioned as a team and was very tight with each other. If you were working with an infaction patient and asked for help you got it. I would float when not busy and do tasks for others. It was great. I think with floor or ward nursing there is not enough coverage and each nurse is stuck there doing everything by themself. There is no support but this type of care is not designed this way. In ER and l&D you must function more as a team and I have seen this to make a difference.
    Jared
  13. by   zeN
    Hello, fellow nurses, this is Zen, and I wanted to share an interesting experience. I left nursing for several years, took other jobs, and returned to the health field this year. I had a lot of issues with nursing years ago. In between I worked a lot of hard, low paying thankless jobs. The worst one was coming home smelling like cow dung, after riding a motorcycle 110 miles round trip. Believe me, it makes an ocassional trache shot seem like a harmless spit wad passing by you from a senseless, freckled, grinning schoolchild.
    I CHANGED MY ATTITUDE. I got excited about learning again, tracing those 12 cranial nerves, naming all the bones in the body (well....) started looking upon the hospital as a wonderful learning experience for so many things we encounter in life. A great supportive bunch of people to work with (not to mention girls!) Great benefits. Away with you, tooth decay, because I have a Dentist now! Anyway, stop, take a breath, take a day off, go swimming, look forward to your next tender kiss, and think what a wonderful job you really have) zeN

    PS I have no idea what plattitudes mean in my usage, I just could'nt think of another word that rhymed with 'attitude!'

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