What level of education do you need to have to teach LPN, medical assistant, RN, MSN?

  1. 2
    Any and all info is greatly appreciated. My vague (and probably incorrect ) understanding was the following:

    To teach CNA: LPN or "higher" degree (now, I also thought medical assistant couldn't teach CNA classes because they weren't taught under the nursing model. I may be mistaken. Please excuse my ignorance. Thanks)
    To teach LPN: BSN preferred (but might be able to teach with ADN)
    To teach medical assistants: BSN preferred (but might be able to teach with ADN)
    To teach RN (associate level): MSN preferred.
    To teach RN (bachelor level): MSN required.
    To teach MSN: PhD required.

    Thanks.
    luvkoi and showbizrn like this.
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I believe I've seen MA's teaching Ma' at some places
  4. 0
    I think it depends on what state you live in. Last year I saw an add for an LPN with x amount of experience to be an instructor for an LPN school here in GA. I could see an LPN teaching many of the basic skills we need before going to the floor.

    I do know in several states CO being one of them if you are taking a refresher course as an LPN you can have another LPN as a preceptor, and that would make sense since in a LTC LPN's are the one's on the floor for the most part not RN's.
  5. 2
    What I found in LVN school where all of the instructors are RN's with BSN's or above is that many times the clinical instructors really don't understand the role of the LVN or are not completely aware of the limitations on our practice. I can't tell how many times I was asked by my instructors "Can LVN's do xyz?"
    showbizrn and DogWmn like this.
  6. 1
    When I was living in California and attending a medical assistant program, it was taught by LPNs and MAs.

    When I was living in California and attending an LVN/LPN program, it was taught by a mix of LVNs, ADNs, BSNs, and MSNs. I now live in Texas, and one of the local LVN/LPN programs utilizes LVNs to teach clinical rotations and BSNs to teach theory.
    DogWmn likes this.
  7. 0
    The standards (minimum preparation) vary from state to state, except in the case of graduate (MSN) programs, where the major accrediting agencies (that accredit universities overall, just not the nursing programs) require that faculty in graduate programs must be doctorally prepared.

    The last time I taught in a BSN program (with an MSN), the nursing administration was begging for someone to teach a graduate course on a topic in which I have a long-standing special interest and a lot of experience. I responded to the administration's request and offered to at least help with the course, and was told that, with "just" an MSN, I could not even team-teach a graduate level course with a doctorally-prepared professor -- I couldn't be invovled, period, the university accreditation standards wouldn't allow it.
  8. 1
    Quote from wih02906
    Any and all info is greatly appreciated. My vague (and probably incorrect ) understanding was the following:

    To teach CNA: LPN or "higher" degree (now, I also thought medical assistant couldn't teach CNA classes because they weren't taught under the nursing model. I may be mistaken. Please excuse my ignorance. Thanks)
    To teach LPN: BSN preferred (but might be able to teach with ADN)
    To teach medical assistants: BSN preferred (but might be able to teach with ADN)
    To teach RN (associate level): MSN preferred.
    To teach RN (bachelor level): MSN required.
    To teach MSN: PhD required.

    Thanks.
    I believe that it varies from state to state but I believe that in my state Medical Assistants cannot teach a CNA class but they can teach Medical Assistant classes. To my knowledge you need to be a LPN or an RN to teach a CNA class in this state. In order to teach LPNs and RN (ADN) I think that you have to have at least a BSN but MSN is preferred (because most of the LPN programs are a part of community college ADN programs.) In order to teach BSN level RN you need to have at least an MSN and in order to teach an MSN or Doctorate level nurse you need to have a Doctorate. I think the goal is that you need to be at least one "step" up above the level of student you are trying to teach.

    !Chris
    showbizrn likes this.
  9. 0
    I am currently teaching in a LVN program here in the bay area. At first, my school thought with five years of experience as a lVN and a certification of completing a "teach the adult learner" CEU it would be sufficient. The board just wrote back and said i was not approved. So, my school is utilizing me as an assistant teacher. here are the requirements : Bachelors degree or a teaching credential. the teaching credential required is for technical and adult education. There are only a few certain schools that california accredited to provide the credential. Or you can work as an assistant teacher for a year. Now this is for me, i am a LVN. I am not sure about the RN requirements to teach in a LVN program. So, I am not able to take LVN students to a clinical site on my own, but i can lecture since my Director is there with me. this is frustrating, since I work acute care Telemetry here in california and have worked in North Carolina where we are able to do a wider assortment of things due to the expanded scope of practice. Another instructor has a BA in english and less experience as a LVN and is able to do it all. I hope this helps.
  10. 0
    In the Community College where I teach, an RN with an ADN or BSN can teach in the LPN program. And an RN with a BSN can teach clinicals, labs, or be the supervisory faculty for final quarter preceptor students in the ADN program, but the classroom or online lecture portion must be taught by someone with an MSN.
  11. 0
    I teach in a LPN program (theory and clinicals). I have my BSN. I will be my MSN next month. I will be able to teach in a RN program. At the moment, I love where I am.


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