What is the biggest frustration for nursing students? - page 4

Just curious as nursing instructors what do find nursing students complain most about or find most challenging. Thanks.... Read More

  1. by   mtacare
    There must be some strict qualifications here in the Philippines to hire Clinical Instructors, better if they also the Education units to have a basic teaching methods and then properly apply it to students.
    A lot of consistencies, sometimes dismay is building up in me!
  2. by   Diahni
    Quote from nurse educate
    Well, this is news to me, and I can't wait to ask my boss about that one.



    Just a little reminder: we are human beings too. We are not perfect. We have bad days too.
    Oh, to be sure. My particular teachers, I am sure, were having bad lives. People are mean when they're unhappy. Grouchy patients I can stand as I appreciate how uncomfortable they are. But the teachers have no excuse. I am happy as a clam finishing up at Excelsior. "Stuck people stick people."
    Diahni
  3. by   gt4everpn
    Dealing with unfair instructors- boy do I have experiences
  4. by   HSMOM
    I had a horrible day today. I had my last check-off for the summer and it happened to be on Medication Administration. I passed the check off, but I would like to ask anyone's opinion about the way the instructor treated me. First of all, we were given 30 minutes for two students to correct a MAR, prepare 9 medications including the med math, an ampule of Demoral and Insulin, give the medications, and mark it off on the MAR...that was fine, I studied a lot. My instructor, who is quite a bit younger than I am, is not ever what I would call overly friendly, but today she was an exceptional treat. These checks are very important. We only have two chances to pass, then we're out of the program. Because the previous students were running late, it meant we were all running late. When it was my turn to fix the meds, the kept looking at the clock, rolling her eyes, huffing, etc. It made me very, very nervous. Not that I wasn't a wreck already....but then, after only drawing an ampule one time before, I'm trying to do this without touching the sides, etc. and the whole time she's huffing, making comments under her break...now, I'm doing this check off with three of my peers watching and listening. I was looking for an insulin syringe...there was a plastic box of mixed up syringes and of course I couldn't find the one with UNITS on it and she says, "What ARE YOU DOING??!" I almost burst into tears, but I was able to maintain professionalism...she did pass me; however, I have never been so embarrassed and humiliated...on the one hand, I realize her job is to make sure we know what we're doing, but I felt like she was very unprofessional for huffing, rolling her eyes, making smart comments, etc. while I was trying to pass a very difficult check off....what do you guys think?
  5. by   Diahni
    Quote from HSMOM
    I had a horrible day today. I had my last check-off for the summer and it happened to be on Medication Administration. I passed the check off, but I would like to ask anyone's opinion about the way the instructor treated me. First of all, we were given 30 minutes for two students to correct a MAR, prepare 9 medications including the med math, an ampule of Demoral and Insulin, give the medications, and mark it off on the MAR...that was fine, I studied a lot. My instructor, who is quite a bit younger than I am, is not ever what I would call overly friendly, but today she was an exceptional treat. These checks are very important. We only have two chances to pass, then we're out of the program. Because the previous students were running late, it meant we were all running late. When it was my turn to fix the meds, the kept looking at the clock, rolling her eyes, huffing, etc. It made me very, very nervous. Not that I wasn't a wreck already....but then, after only drawing an ampule one time before, I'm trying to do this without touching the sides, etc. and the whole time she's huffing, making comments under her break...now, I'm doing this check off with three of my peers watching and listening. I was looking for an insulin syringe...there was a plastic box of mixed up syringes and of course I couldn't find the one with UNITS on it and she says, "What ARE YOU DOING??!" I almost burst into tears, but I was able to maintain professionalism...she did pass me; however, I have never been so embarrassed and humiliated...on the one hand, I realize her job is to make sure we know what we're doing, but I felt like she was very unprofessional for huffing, rolling her eyes, making smart comments, etc. while I was trying to pass a very difficult check off....what do you guys think?
    HSMOM:
    Poor You! The incident you describe is the kind of thing that drove me to finish my nursing training online. I have been reminded by many that nursing school is not the same experience as working as a nurse. And if you do find yourself working with unpleasant people as a nurse, well, it is an employees' market out there, and you can quit. Each "subculture," such as nursing school has a certain atmosphere to it. I understand firefighters have a close knit, family atmosphere, and so on. Once I mentioned some scenes such as you describe to a very lovely friend who is a nurse, she reminded me that "nurses aren't always very nice to other nurses." I maintain that nursing instructors are the worst, however. You have two choices - put up with it until it's over, or see if you can finish online. I feel your pain, believe me.
    There really aren't very many professional environments where people get away with acting like this. Maybe in a sweatshop. If there any way to improve this toxic environment? I was screamed at and belittled by nursing instructors who were younger than me. The only way this kind of thing will change is if enough people get fed up with it. When I spoke up, I realized the only resolution was to leave, and I thank God I had options.
    Diahni
  6. by   Horselover44
    As a former student, I just obtained my MSN in May, I think that instructors that don't treat the students as adult learners, would be a huge disservice.
    When I went to nursing school, 20 years ago, the ages of students were 18-40's, mostly right out of high school. SO these students needed the structure and guidance that my instructors gave. Today, many students are chosing nursing as a second career and are adult learners, and instructors must acknowledge their intended audience and teach at that level.
  7. by   Diahni
    Quote from Horselover44
    As a former student, I just obtained my MSN in May, I think that instructors that don't treat the students as adult learners, would be a huge disservice.
    When I went to nursing school, 20 years ago, the ages of students were 18-40's, mostly right out of high school. SO these students needed the structure and guidance that my instructors gave. Today, many students are chosing nursing as a second career and are adult learners, and instructors must acknowledge their intended audience and teach at that level.
    HOrselover44:
    Definitely, many instructors don't "get" the obvious - that older students bring far more to the table than younger ones, and the teaching techniques may differ. But really, nobody, young or old, learns by getting intimidated, humiliated and screamed at. Words could never describe the contempt I have for the nasty women who do this to nursing students. Not only is it ugly, it doesn't work. Not only is there a shortage of nursing instructors, there is a shortage of instructors with a high "EQ." Anybody who knows anything about human behavior, never mind teaching, knows that you catch more flies with honey than vinegar.
    Diahni
  8. by   HSMOM
    Diahni,

    Thank you for your response! It did make me feel better to hear that this happens in a lot of different places, and no one thinks anyone deserves to be treated that way. Unfortunately, I have heard from students a year ahead of me in the program that the last thing I should do is complain or go to the head of the department. It seems that if the nursing instructors do not "like" you then they will find a way to get rid of you. I have been going to school for the last six years to earn my pre-reqs, I worked a full time job until recently, and I have a small child...not to mention a husband..okay, that means I have two small children...just kidding I just expected to be treated with respect that all people deserve. I am in the accelerated program, so I really only have a year and a half to go....when I graduate, I think I will let the department know that those methods are NOT effective!!!
  9. by   Diahni
    Quote from HSMOM
    Diahni,

    Thank you for your response! It did make me feel better to hear that this happens in a lot of different places, and no one thinks anyone deserves to be treated that way. Unfortunately, I have heard from students a year ahead of me in the program that the last thing I should do is complain or go to the head of the department. It seems that if the nursing instructors do not "like" you then they will find a way to get rid of you. I have been going to school for the last six years to earn my pre-reqs, I worked a full time job until recently, and I have a small child...not to mention a husband..okay, that means I have two small children...just kidding I just expected to be treated with respect that all people deserve. I am in the accelerated program, so I really only have a year and a half to go....when I graduate, I think I will let the department know that those methods are NOT effective!!!
    HSMOM,
    Oh definitely it happens a lot. God forbid you have a "whistle blower" personality, because complaining, as you said, will ensure that they will figure a way to toss you out. I wouldn't even bother letting them know anything. Once you're out, don't look back!
    Diahni
  10. by   smk1
    Quote from HSMOM
    I had a horrible day today. I had my last check-off for the summer and it happened to be on Medication Administration. I passed the check off, but I would like to ask anyone's opinion about the way the instructor treated me. First of all, we were given 30 minutes for two students to correct a MAR, prepare 9 medications including the med math, an ampule of Demoral and Insulin, give the medications, and mark it off on the MAR...that was fine, I studied a lot. My instructor, who is quite a bit younger than I am, is not ever what I would call overly friendly, but today she was an exceptional treat. These checks are very important. We only have two chances to pass, then we're out of the program. Because the previous students were running late, it meant we were all running late. When it was my turn to fix the meds, the kept looking at the clock, rolling her eyes, huffing, etc. It made me very, very nervous. Not that I wasn't a wreck already....but then, after only drawing an ampule one time before, I'm trying to do this without touching the sides, etc. and the whole time she's huffing, making comments under her break...now, I'm doing this check off with three of my peers watching and listening. I was looking for an insulin syringe...there was a plastic box of mixed up syringes and of course I couldn't find the one with UNITS on it and she says, "What ARE YOU DOING??!" I almost burst into tears, but I was able to maintain professionalism...she did pass me; however, I have never been so embarrassed and humiliated...on the one hand, I realize her job is to make sure we know what we're doing, but I felt like she was very unprofessional for huffing, rolling her eyes, making smart comments, etc. while I was trying to pass a very difficult check off....what do you guys think?
    Sounds like the instructor who checked me off. Tapping her foot, snatching things right out of my hands, among other things that I won't type because who knows if she is a member here and will recognize herself and I don't want any repercussions. I have a LOT that I could say about this gem. Most others were pretty good but this woman is just...
  11. by   rhenmag9

    * so much workload,so little time.

    * examination unannounced

    * discipline for proper uniform,and haircut..(they hate it..!)

    * complaining of bulk of nursing notes/nursing care plan..

    *graveyard shift duty

    * long hours of lectures/return demonstrations!!!
  12. by   Horselover44
    Originally Posted by HSMOM
    I had a horrible day today. I had my last check-off for the summer and it happened to be on Medication Administration.
    I think this instructor's behavior was totally unprofessional and ridiculus. I cannot believe an instructor behaved in such a manner, the dean should be notified of this behavior and I would hope the instructor would be reprimanded. Totally innapropriate in my eyes.
  13. by   catlvr
    I love learning, and am excited to be in nursing school (only 2 more months of LPN classes!). My frustrations are similar to others: I show you respect, and unless I have done something to offend you, I deserve respect in return. If I have unwittingly offended you, please approach me. I have worked for 20 years as a professional assistant, and know that these things happen and that the best way to deal with them is to be open and direct*. I will offer you the same in return. I am one of the few students who "defend" the instructors.

    I study very hard, and read outside of the texts. If I question something on a test, it is because I am asking for clarification, not necessarily for the points. BUT - if two instructors ask the same question with the same choices and accept two different answers, at least one of those times I must be correct! Please be fair about that.

    If you are a faculty advisor, please don't tell the students that you are too busy to talk to them and repeatedly cancel their appointments without prior notice. I understand busy - that is why I made an appointment that we mutually agreed upon. I also understand paperwork - unless it is a life and death matter, a person should take prescedense, esp. if they have an appointment.

    When a student asks a question, it does not reflect well upon you to belittle that person for not knowing the answer. It does shut down the rest of the class. I have very thick skin, so I continue to carefully ask questions; I can't tell you how many times I've had fellow students thank me for getting clarification that they were too scared to ask for.

    Many of us students have full-time lives outside of school and there is only so much that we can do to reschedule at the last minute. Please provide us with a clinical schedule at least a few days before we are scheduled to go somewhere. It makes childcare etc very difficult.

    Also, not all students want to work in a hospital in med-surg. The focus is often on preparing us for that, and while I understand the reasoning, there are students with varied backgrounds that will allow them to bypass that if they wish to pursue a different career path. Please don't discriminate against a student who knows their physicial limitations by "marking them down" because they might not be able to work a 12 hour med-surg shift.

    The last item I hesitate to write, but will: I am paying for a service, and I expect that you will come to class prepared to provide the service. Please do not just read from the text; your value as an instructor is your professional experience, since I'm quite capable of reading on my own. Please do not use the students as your "whipping boy". If you are having a bad day, tell us (no details necessary, of course). We can adjust and get done with what we need to do. To snap, berate, and yell offers nothing positive, and damages the school's reputation. I think that is the unprofessionalism that we hear so much about.

    I am very grateful for the good instructors...those who are engaged and excited about teaching and nursing. At the risk of sounding cheesy, I think that it is an honor to be a nurse, and can't wait to get started.

    e

    *I practice what I preach - it is easy to figure out of I am one of your students, since my user name is not coded!

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