Staff Communication

  1. I am looking for ideas to get changes and new information out to staff. We have tried email, posting stuff in the breakrooms and bathrooms, mailboxes, and have a monthly newsletter. Staff, for whatever reason, choose not to read it. Then, of course, when they are called on it, they say, no one ever told me. We also give information at staff meetings but few staff attend. It is mandatory that they read and sign the minutes, but they still say they didn't know anything about it. I had one nurse have the nerve to tell me it was my job to personally notify every staff member of any changes or new policies (I have over 500 staff members in my division) in person.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   classicdame
    I don't know where you practice, but in Texas the Nurse Practice Act clearly states that each nurse is responsible and accountable for knowing policies and procedures at their place of employment. I include that tidbit in new nurse orientation. Could you talk to your CNO about a mandatory class on responsibility and accountability? It could include other aspects, such as documentation, HIPAA regulations, etc. Have each nurse sign a document stating they are aware of the policy regarding personal responsiblity (you DO have a policy I hope). Then let them complain. Some people practice blaming behaviors rather than own up to their own deficiencies.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    How a 3 ring binder communication book that can be placed at the nurses' desk(s)?
  5. by   darynash
    I do practice in Texas and we have tried the Communication Book too. I guess I need to work on the manager's to have them hold their staff accountable. It seems "professional responsibility" has been lost. What a shame.
  6. by   llg
    One suggestion I have is to cut back on the number of communications and "communication routes." When people are bombarded with thing after thing after thing, they begin to tune it out.

    Try having 1 standard weekly thing to read and sign and then follow-up with the people who don't sign promptly. With the expectation simple and clear, there will be no excuses for not seeing the information. Hold those who aren't complying with the requirement to read and sign the weekly thing accountable. Offer a reward to those who do it consistently.

    The above approach may seem time consuming at first, but in the end you save time because the system is so simple and streamlined. People learn the routine quickly and you only have a few slackers to deal with. As the punishments escalate with repeated non-compliance, they eventually shape up or ship out.
  7. by   truern
    We have email that we're supposed to check daily.....when/IF we have time. It's frustrating wading thru all the junk to find the jewels. Heck, I've even seen an email about somebody's car lights left on!!!

    Personally, I like the signs in the staff bathroom.
  8. by   cardiacnurse05
    This is an issue on our unit too. We have stuff posted in the bathroom, breakroom bulletin boards, break room door, at the nurses station in 2 different spots and in our dictation/work rooms. The big problem that I see is that same thing is being posted in 6 different places. I am working on organizing the bulletin boards and making a section specifically for "need to know" stuff. I am hoping I can get the clinical resource nurse to take accountability in making sure everyone else is taking accountability. One place I worked did a weekly notes and required initialing. It worked very well.
  9. by   RedERRN
    Quote from darynash
    I am looking for ideas to get changes and new information out to staff. We have tried email, posting stuff in the breakrooms and bathrooms, mailboxes, and have a monthly newsletter. Staff, for whatever reason, choose not to read it. Then, of course, when they are called on it, they say, no one ever told me. We also give information at staff meetings but few staff attend. It is mandatory that they read and sign the minutes, but they still say they didn't know anything about it. I had one nurse have the nerve to tell me it was my job to personally notify every staff member of any changes or new policies (I have over 500 staff members in my division) in person.
    Gosh...you must work at The Med in the ER with me.... :trout:
  10. by   sscathlab
    Our hospital which is in Texas too is now going to Accountabilty agreement. We have had certain issues that are falling to the wayside one of them being getting an allergy band on every pt. So my CNO came up with this Accountability agreement. all nurses have to sign it. IF something happens and they dont live up to the agreement, they will be disciplined. These agreements are for things that like I said earlier arent getting done when they are required. We are just now starting them so I will let you know what the response is from the staff and how they work out. I know one of the agreements which I had to personally sign was about staffing.

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