Preceptors vs. clinical instructors

  1. 0
    I am a clinical instructor for sophomore 'Fundamentals of Nursing' students. In the Junior year, my students have preceptors for OB (unpaid staff nurses with a BSN), but a clinical instructor in psych (1:8 ratio). I am wondering how common it is for students to be precepted, and what you think the effect is on the quality of the learning experience.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 2,398 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I remember all of my preceptors. Some really great nurses. Our (LPN) union got them the princely sum of 50cents/hour in additional wages when they have a student.

    Some where just randomly assigned to us on the unit, others had taken a course in how to be an effective preceptor. I think they have to really love nursing and like students.

    My favourite student memory is of my preceptor saying "I haven't done that in years" she then went and got a procedures manual and walked me through the procedure. I appreciated her honesty and willingess to relearn things along with me. I doubt that any of my instructors from college would have been willing to do that.

    She retires in two years and nursing will be loosing a great LPN.
  6. 0
    Quote from bookwormom
    I am a clinical instructor for sophomore 'Fundamentals of Nursing' students. In the Junior year, my students have preceptors for OB (unpaid staff nurses with a BSN), but a clinical instructor in psych (1:8 ratio). I am wondering how common it is for students to be precepted, and what you think the effect is on the quality of the learning experience.
    It is becoming more and more common for preceptors to be utilized, even in associate-degree programs. The push is on with most boards of nursing strongly recommending (or requiring) a preceptorship-type experience in the last semester. The IOM draft on the nursing shortage in North Carolina also was recommending more of a preceptorship-type experience.

    Quality-control is definitely an issue, and also finding sufficient numbers of staff nurses who are willing and qualified to precept.

    I personally think that as long as faculty take great care to ensure a good "fit" between student and precepting nurse, the precepting experience can be a great learning experience for the student.
  7. 0
    I'm in my last semester of my associates degree and one of our requirements is to follow and work with a preceptor to graduate. I'm looking forward to it. I think it will be a more honest look at the area you interested in working. We can choose which area we want to do this in. I'm thinking I might like to try psychiatric nursing, because it's seems like it would be very interesting and I've never worked in that field before. I wish we had to do this in my LPN training.
  8. 0
    I just graduated from an assoc. program, and one of my rotations in the final semester had us paired with a preceptor. There was still a clinical instructor, but the students in my group were spread out on 4 floors of the hospital. It was one of the most enjoyable experiences I've had as a student. Don't get me wrong--I got along great with every one of my clinical instructors--but I feel like I learned so much more with the preceptor and it was a lot less stressful knowing that she wasn't "grading" me. It was also nice not having to share one instructor among 10 students.
  9. 0
    I agree, VickyRN.
  10. 0
    I have done a little research on this topic lately. Seems that precepted experiences are valuable in many ways to both student and the institution. The preceptor generally has an enriching experience as well. Negatives: preceptor and instructor may emphasize different things. Student is being graded on what instructor thinks is impt. so that can be confusing to some students. Preceptors may have tons of practical experience but little teaching experience so might instill "bad habits". The worst is "I don't care what they teach you, this is the real world" attitude. Our hospital has a liaison nurse who tries to keep preceptors abreast of new educational trends and keep the school informed on practice trends. This seems to be mutually beneficial.


Top