Okay, now a question for nurse educators from a pre-nursing student

  1. [font=Comic Sans MS]I had a started a thread a couple of days ago on why students dropped out of the nursing program and received many great responses from nursing students. Now I would like to ask nursing educators the same question. Also, what is the best way to be a success in nursing school?
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    [font=Comic Sans MS]Eagerly looking forward to your responses.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   purplemania
    Admission tests are one way to filter out persons not likely to complete the academic portion of the course. If tests are not given, or have weak criteria, then people are admitted who will have difficulty doing the required readings and course work. There are always personal reasons, like finances and moving away. But nursing has governing bodies (state & school level) with requirements to be met. Standards are high and there is a lot of information to be learned in a short period of time. Nursing school is hard and requires discipline to complete. So the reasons are many, but it boils down to this: if the program does not meet expectations of the student, then the student may drop out. If the student does not meet course expectations, then the student fails. It is not for everyone.
  4. by   VickyRN
    Quote from mccnrs2b
    [font=Comic Sans MS]I had a started a thread a couple of days ago on why students dropped out of the nursing program and received many great responses from nursing students. Now I would like to ask nursing educators the same question. Also, what is the best way to be a success in nursing school?
    [font=Comic Sans MS]
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Eagerly looking forward to your responses.
    Nursing programs are extremely stressful with an enormous amount of information (actually, an entire culture) to be absorbed and synthesized in a very short time. The only metaphor that I can use is that it is similar to being in the Army--unrelenting, demanding, very time-intensive, and it will try you to your core. It is so rigorous that most students have little time or energy left to devote to other interests throughout the entire duration of the program. This is an unfortunate fact, but reality. The student needs to ask him/ herself before embarking on nursing school--am I really willing and prepared to pay such a price--to essentially not have a life for 2, 3, or 4 years???? :uhoh21:

    The questions that are used in nursing examinations are very different from what most students have become accustomed. These are not simply "knowledge" or "remembering" questions, but are mostly the higher order: applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating. The students do not like this, nor are they used to this! They want to simply "regurgitate" the information we present them, but we require them to critically think! This is to prepare them to be safe and effective bedside nurses and to pass the NCLEX.
    (The new NCLEX is actually now including the "multiple choice/ multiple answer" and "choose all that apply.")

    Most students definitely are not used to the "higher order" level of questioning either, and it is a very, very difficult transition for them to make. We have "4.0" students entering our program who barely squeak out a "C" the first semester (110). It is quite a culture shock for them and, although our retention rates have improved greatly, many do not make it.

    The best way for success in nursing school (IMHO) is to always keep a positive attitude and to be determined to always do your best. Have a spirit of excellence, be persistent, and don't become distracted from your goal. Keep your focus through the thick and thin. It is normal to feel overwhelmed--Take it one day at a time. A little humor along the way helps! Make sure you have a good support system of family and friends.

    When you come to class, always look and dress professional. Sit in the front of the classroom, in the "teacher's T." I know it is a daunting task (I myself am in Masters school with a more than fulltime schedule, besides teaching!), but always try to stay on top of your assignments and readings. It may not be possible to keep up with the volumes of readings, but at least skim the chapters, noting the highlights, before the instructor's lecture. With your instructor's permission, tape record the lectures and play them back often. Form a study group with a focused group of students. Buy a good NCLEX review book at the beginning of nursing school (one that is broken down by subject) and use it often to get used to this new way of testing--this will be an enormous help. If you find you are having difficulty in an area, don't wait until the end of the semester to ask for help! Be proactive and seek help from your instructors early.

    I hope this advice will be helpful and I wish you the best as you join our wonderful profession.
  5. by   SarasotaRN2b
    [font=Comic Sans MS][font=Comic Sans MS]VickyRN, thank you so much for your very thorough reply. I thought it touched on everything that I was looking for. Thank you!
  6. by   rkrs6673
    Buy a good NCLEX review book at the beginning of nursing school (one that is broken down by subject) and use it often to get used to this new way of testing--this will be an enormous help. If you find you are having difficulty in an area, don't wait until the end of the semester to ask for help! Be proactive and seek help from your instructors early.


    This information is very helpful
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from rkrs6673
    Buy a good NCLEX review book at the beginning of nursing school (one that is broken down by subject) and use it often to get used to this new way of testing--this will be an enormous help. If you find you are having difficulty in an area, don't wait until the end of the semester to ask for help! Be proactive and seek help from your instructors early.


    This information is very helpful
    Glad to be of help
  8. by   pmchap
    Hi,
    Apart from the academic stresses placed on students I have seen a number of undergraduate students drop nursing for other reasons. One big one is that currently with the nursing shortage that exists the Australian government is selling the idea of nursing through the media - the sales pitch is great - unfortunately it isn't exactly honest about the true practice that the vocation is.

    Quite a number of undergraduate after the first couple of clinical exposures realise what nursing is really like and opt out of nursing and convert to a different course. (I think this is better than discovering after completing their program that they dislike nursing).

    I would love to see aptitude/attitude tests included in the selection of undergraduate nursing students. We currently provide work exposure to our potential school based trainees (before the start the traineeships) and there are some candidates which don't do the traineeship because the realise that nursing is not for them.

    Cheers
    pmchap
  9. by   purplemania
    In this country, students who have enough resources (materially and scholastically) make excellent nursing students but tend to balk at the "dirty work" required in actual practice. Many have never taken care of an aged, ill or disabled person and resent the intimacy of direct patient care. I think this falls under "student expectations" though. I hear them talk about their career goals and realize how clueless they are as to what real nursing practice entails.

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