Nursing students who do not understand what nursing is about - page 5

by DNS on the go

8,264 Views | 69 Comments

Yesterday, in post conference a students asked me when are they going to learn "real" nursing. Each student had done med pass on one or two patients that day. When I asked the student what he meant he stated that nursing is not... Read More


  1. 2
    It would have been interesting to know what the student who wanted to learn about "real" nursing actually meant. Might have started a great discussion on the realities of nursing, how to be agents of change, patient advocates, etc., etc.
    dudette10 and Altra like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from nep1980
    What then is nursing judgment?
    Nursing judgment is part of contributing to the care; in the end we are all contributors and not the final yea or nah sayers
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    I am also a second degree BSN and I have to say that I think you are way off the mark.

    First of all, I left my last career just as it was becoming lucrative to me because I wanted something more fulfilling. While I have certainly felt more fulfilled in nursing, I have also questioned my own sanity in leaving a job where I had more respect and better pay to run my rear end off in the ER!

    My fellow second bachelors students were also not "failure to launch" candidates but rather people who felt more focused and ready for a new role. This is not a crime!

    In terms of whether or not nursing is a job where you must demonstrate leadership, I agree with the student: it is.

    As an RN, I very much tire of listening to nurses who think of nursing as being task oriented. To them, its all about doing meds or starting IVs. Well, I may be just trotting out my own personal theory but I am thinking that most of the facilities are past the point where they want to pay RNs NOT to think.

    I remember taking a team of patients from another RN who was simply awaiting a patient transfer to a psych facility. The patient had been holding for DAYS. I went to the charge, called our social worker and the facility the patient was supposed to go to and got the ball rolling by advocating for this patient. Most RNs are just content to let the patient await transfer while they busy themselves with the "jobs" of nursing but in the end, we are accountable for these people.

    I also notice that more and more, we are accountable for procedural practice. Is everyone wearing a mask and cap? If not, why not, Ms RN? It is up to us to manage infection control during a procedure.

    If I were advising the OP, I would say please go teach the people who still think that its all about doing doing doing and not about delegating, thinking and leading.
    dudette10, Altra, JacobK, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from boogalina
    The solution to many of the problems noted by the OP and others would be to require licensure of a prospective nursing student as a CNA before allowing him/her into a nursing education program. After all, it's not like "House" where doctors perform intensive bedside care, leaving RN's free to gad about in the background!
    This is actually a common practice. I know of only one school in my area that doesnt require students to be a CNA before they can apply. Even the BSN program requires a cna license to meet application standards.
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    To the OP:

    Judge people much? Maybe you should just quit teaching if this is how you feel about students.

    I can't stand teachers who think that they know everything about every student and judge everyone based on some sort of psychic abilities they think they have of knowing everything about everyone.
    Residentmaid likes this.
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    AOx1,

    I LOVED reading your post. Very well written, concise and to the point. Thank you for sharing.
  7. 0
    Quote from honeykrown
    Nursing judgment is part of contributing to the care; in the end we are all contributors and not the final yea or nah sayers
    I think that nep1980 was posing this as a rhetorical question.
  8. 5
    Quote from kakamegamama
    It would have been interesting to know what the student who wanted to learn about "real" nursing actually meant. Might have started a great discussion on the realities of nursing, how to be agents of change, patient advocates, etc., etc.
    How can you be an "agent of change" or a "patient advocate" until you have actually done the work and know what it is that needs to be changed and for whom/what you need to advocate?
    canoehead, pomegranate, Old.Timer, and 2 others like this.
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    I am tempted to defend myself as a second degree "failure to launch" student, but I will refrain.

    OP, have you sat these students down and had a lecture on what a nurse does? You seem to expect them to automatically know these things. You're the teacher, they are the students. I think this is a classic teaching moment. Do some teaching.
  10. 0
    WOW!!! So the reason that I finished my RN at 40+, after 17 years as an LPN, is because I somehow failed in my "first career". Huh, I thought it was because I was busy raising 3 children with asperger's syndrome! Not everyone has had the opportunity and resources to go to college at 18, and life quickly catches up with you. I won't be so quick to judge you on your statement's, as I just don't have enough information. Just remember the same about those you teach. You just don't have enough information. They are there to learn from you, and some will take more of your time then others, with more creativity on your part. 8)


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