Nursing educators- salaries

  1. What are current salaries for new MSN graduates who want to teach in a hospital nursing school or community college program ?
    Also how are part time clinical instructors paid ? Hourly ? Average wages ?
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  2. 56 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Quote from ginat113
    What are current salaries for new MSN graduates who want to teach in a hospital nursing school or community college program?
    Rough estimate - $40,000 - $60,000 annually (anywhere from 9 mo to 12 mo contract)

    Quote from ginat113
    Also how are part time clinical instructors paid ? Hourly ? Average wages ?
    In my experience, hourly. In this area of the country (rural NC), $20-$25/hr. Also is factored in extra hours for grading clinical paperwork (usually 6 extra hours/ week).

    Hope this helps
  4. by   DeigoT
    Quote from ginat113
    What are current salaries for new MSN graduates who want to teach in a hospital nursing school or community college program ?
    Also how are part time clinical instructors paid ? Hourly ? Average wages ?
    About 5 years ago, I taught clinicals (as an adjunct assistant professor) for an ADN program at a community college in New York at a rate of $57/hr. I recently saw an add for an adjunct clinical instructor at a community college in Philadelphia for $60/hr. A friend of mine currently teaches clinicals for an LPN program in Ft. Lauderdale for $30/hr. (I have a MSN, she has a BSN). Another friend teaches in NY, not sure of her title, but she has been there for about 8 years and teaches both clinicals and lectures. I believe she told me she makes apx $60,000/yr. She has a MSN.
  5. by   DeigoT
    Quote from DeigoT
    About 5 years ago, I taught clinicals (as an adjunct assistant professor) for an ADN program at a community college in New York at a rate of $57/hr. I recently saw an add for an adjunct clinical instructor at a community college in Philadelphia for $60/hr. A friend of mine currently teaches clinicals for an LPN program in Ft. Lauderdale for $30/hr. (I have a MSN, she has a BSN). Another friend teaches in NY, not sure of her title, but she has been there for about 8 years and teaches both clinicals and lectures. I believe she told me she makes apx $60,000/yr. She has a MSN.
    Just wanted to add, that $57/hr did not include the times spent selecting patients (which had to be done the evening before clinicals) or times spent grading care plans.
  6. by   VickyRN
    One of my former professors, who holds the outstanding credentials of a full tenured professorship with PhD in nursing, once confided that she only makes ~$56,000 annually. This is with a fulltime schedule and numerous research projects. She has also authored and published many abstracts and journal articles. This is absolutely shameful when one considers that a CRNA will start out with a salary of 100-120 grand or an NP in the 70's or 80's
    Last edit by VickyRN on Nov 27, '05
  7. by   DeigoT
    I definately agree with VickyRN. And they wonder why there is difficulty recruiting full-time faculty. I have been told by a friend of mine who teaches, that some of the students who graduated from the program with an associate degree will have a higher starting salary than her current salary. And she has been doing this for several years.
  8. by   Shane_in_Arizona
    As you've seen, salaries vary widely by geographic region, and probably by concentration of qualified msn-prepared faculty as well. Ironically, you may find higher salaries in some of the more rural areas where it is more difficult to find nurses who have the msn. I think that VickyRN's post is pretty on the mark at $40,000-$60,000. At our school in rural AZ, we tend to be at the top third of that range for a 9 month position. We're a community college, so there is no research requirement. Our part-time clinical faculty make about $25 an hour.
  9. by   Jenni in MO
    I have just started teaching this fall at a University in Missouri. The range that I was quoted during interviews was $45,000 to $50,000 for a non-tenured track clinical assistant professor teaching both lecture and clinicals. I am thinking that this is probably a little low comparatively
  10. by   TheCommuter
    Back in April 2005, one of the part-time clinical instructors in my LVN program was an MSN and she confided that she earned $29 hourly. Keep in mind that this school was located in the greater Los Angeles area. She said that her full-time coworker, an LVN, earned $48 hourly because he held a master's degree in education and performed the undesirable task of teaching the part time weekend LVN class.
  11. by   1Tulip
    I have an application in for a tenure track position in a BSN program. I don't know what the salary is (obviously I'll be interviewing them as they interview me...) but I don't expect it to be as much as I could make in clinical practice. HOWEVER, it better d@mn-well be comparable to the salary of a similarly qualified assistant-to-full-professor in Biology or Journalism or English!!!

    To bad we can't make what the Athletic Director gets.
  12. by   berylmac
    Quote from ginat113
    What are current salaries for new MSN graduates who want to teach in a hospital nursing school or community college program ?
    Also how are part time clinical instructors paid ? Hourly ? Average wages ?
    As a mastered prepared nurse educator with 23 years of clinical experience, I am currently making $41K a year as an associate professor of nursing at an Oregon rural community college ADN program. This is my third and, most likely, my final year as a nursing professor due to the low pay and demanding work load.
    Our new graduates start at $65K at the local community hospital. Our faculty to student ratio in the classroom is 1:63 while the clinical ratio is 1:10, meeting the state requirement. As a full time nursing faculty, in addition to classroom teaching, I am also expected to mentor a 2nd year clinical group, with 2 hours of lab time and 10 hours of clinical supervision.
    I am exhausted working every evening and weekend grading papers, projects and doing research to keep current with the latest evidenced-based practices in nursing.
    In Oregon, the professional nurses organization has an initiative to support increasing the numbers of registered nurses graduating from programs in order to meet the ever increasing demand for qualified nurses in all fields of nursing.
    As a nation and profession, we are in dire straights to recruit and retain qualified nurse educators in our nursing programs. If we don't demand comparable market value salaries for nurse educators, we, as a nation of consumers can expect the quality and availability of nursing care to dramatically diminish on a yearly basis.
  13. by   berylmac
    Hi! I am starting my 4th year as an associate professor of nursing at an Oregon rural community college ADN program. I am a MSN with 23 years of clinical experience in addition to being a professional educator for 34 years. I love nursing and teaching, but due to the demeaning low salary of a nurse educator, ($41k) this will be my last year at the college.
    I also teach and consult in project management and I make $125 an hour so I will be leaving nursing in order to be financially secure. It is ironic that I need to leave a profession that I love and contribute substantially to in order to be financially stable.
    As a profession and nation of consumers, we had better wake up and take action to recruit and retain qualified nurse educators with comparable market value to that of middle to upper nurse managers. If we don't - we all will lose!
  14. by   VickyRN
    I feel your pain, berylmac, and I am in the midst of a major job transition myself.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Aug 10, '06

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