Nursing Academia We Need New Blood! - page 2

by VickyRN Asst. Admin

13,255 Views | 59 Comments

The average age of academic nurse educators in the u.s. is 55.5 years. Meanwhile, the average age at which nurse faculty members retire is 62.5 years. it is not surprising, therefore, that at least 40% of currently-practicing... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from NJMike
    I absolutely agree with you. Plus I can tell by the information you wrote in the above post that you are in the USA.
    Are you a nurse educator? If so, what are the typical faculty ages and retirement statistics within your nursing school? Has it been difficult for you to recruit new faculty? If you are a qualified nurse educator, has it been difficult for you to find a teaching position? If you are not a nurse educator I respectfully ask - how do you know enough about the matter to "agree?" I would be very interested to hear your perspective. So please elaborate.

    Please see my earlier reply about my experience in my nursing program, a huge university-based nursing program within North Carolina.
  2. 2
    I have an MSN (APN) and yep, I can't now nor do I see myself in the future taking a pay cut to teach.
    VickyRN and madwife2002 like this.
  3. 2
    I am a unit manager of a dialysis center and I earn $66,000 a year. I work sometimes 40-80 hours a week and I am on call 24/7
    Wages are poor here in Ohio. I cannot imagine how much educators earn here
    oh yeah I will probably work til I am 100 at this rate.

    Very interesting read thank you VickyRN
    traumaRUs and VickyRN like this.
  4. 4
    Respectfully I agree with what someone else said. They have been talking about a dire shortage of nursing teachers for over 15 years.

    In addition I think the educators won't be the young ones you want. The teachers will most likely come form the ranks of older nurses who can't take the physical or stress level of direct care.

    I think having fewer nursing schools would help. In my area we have too many nursing programs graduating too many nurses who can't find jobs. Sorry but this is my opinion.
    tyvin, CCRNDiva, elkpark, and 1 other like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from CloudySky
    In addition I think the educators won't be the young ones you want. The teachers will most likely come form the ranks of older nurses who can't take the physical or stress level of direct care.
    I've worked many jobs and still work part-time in a clinical RN staffing position at my local hospital. Contrary to the popular stereotype, being a nurse educator can be as stressful - if not more stressful - than any nursing job in a hospital. Often we put in enormous hours, way beyond the typical 40 hour work week. And a good portion of that labor is hands-on and physical.

    I take exception to what you say about nursing instructors "can't take the physical or stress level of direct care." I, for one, have three groups of 9-10 students each on a busy clinical floor. (This equates to 7 to 8 students being on the floor, each taking care of at least one patient.) It takes tremendous stamina, endurance, leadership, keen memory, flexibility, and organization skills to keep up with that many students and that may patients (under the students' care) on a high-acuity unit that has nurse-patient ratios much lower than the 7-8 students we have typically on the floor during our shift. Talk about stress! And yes, we instructors participate in direct patient care on the floor also - helping our students turn, bathe, ambulate, etc. The work can be very physical at time. Being a clinical nursing instructor is definitely not for the faint in heart! BTW, some of the older faculty we have in our program can run circles around the younger nurses.
    MandaRN94, iteachob, and Purple_Scrubs like this.
  6. 7
    The "faculty shortage" will continue until schools become serious about recruiting and retaining strong faculty. For the past several years (decades?), they have been running on a model that doesn't match the actual societal/workforce realities. They don't offer jobs that real people want. When they start looking at the jobs they have to offer through the eyes of those in the workforce looking for employment ... things will improve.

    Salary is only the tip of the iceberg. Another big issue relates to the schedule/hours/etc. In my area, they look for adjunct instructors -- people to work nearly full time for a few months per year ... and then have no work for the rest of the year. They pay those adjuncts less than a full time salary even though they are working full time hours and give them no benefits ... and only want them to work a couple months of the year, to cover some specific clinical rotations. That type of job may have worked for some people many years ago, when married women only wanted to work on a temporary basis while their kids were in school and they didn't have to worry about health insurance, retirement, etc. because "hubby" took care of all that. But that type of employment model doesn't match the needs of working professionals today.

    I have ties with several schools -- all of which struggle to find short-term adjunct faculty on a regular basis. When they convert those multiple little adjunct positions to solid FTE's (either full time or part time) ... with benefits and some job security ... they'll find takers. Until then, they are not attractive positions for many people.

    People need real jobs with full benefits and a steady income they can count on -- and income commensurate with their economic worth in the job market. Many people would be willing to accept a little less salary to do what they love and if the workplace were attractive. Until schools get serious about changing the ways they do things -- and start considering the needs of the workers they are trying to hire -- they will struggle.
    mystory, nursel56, Altra, and 4 others like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from llg
    the "faculty shortage" will continue until schools become serious about recruiting and retaining strong faculty. for the past several years (decades?), they have been running on a model that doesn't match the actual societal/workforce realities. they don't offer jobs that real people want. when they start looking at the jobs they have to offer through the eyes of those in the workforce looking for employment ... things will improve.

    salary is only the tip of the iceberg. another big issue relates to the schedule/hours/etc. in my area, they look for adjunct instructors -- people to work nearly full time for a few months per year ... and then have no work for the rest of the year. they pay those adjuncts less than a full time salary even though they are working full time hours and give them no benefits ... and only want them to work a couple months of the year, to cover some specific clinical rotations. that type of job may have worked for some people many years ago, when married women only wanted to work on a temporary basis while their kids were in school and they didn't have to worry about health insurance, retirement, etc. because "hubby" took care of all that. but that type of employment model doesn't match the needs of working professionals today.

    i have ties with several schools -- all of which struggle to find short-term adjunct faculty on a regular basis. when they convert those multiple little adjunct positions to solid fte's (either full time or part time) ... with benefits and some job security ... they'll find takers. until then, they are not attractive positions for many people.

    people need real jobs with full benefits and a steady income they can count on -- and income commensurate with their economic worth in the job market. many people would be willing to accept a little less salary to do what they love and if the workplace were attractive. until schools get serious about changing the ways they do things -- and start considering the needs of the workers they are trying to hire -- they will struggle.
    excellent points, llg. i know in our huge university-based program our director would like to offer more appealing faculty positions, salaries, and benefits, but our hands are tied, due to hiring and wage restrictions secondary to draconian state budget cuts. and we've all been warned to get ready for another round of cuts, which will be even more austere.
  8. 1
    Quote from meg2465
    Any idea why educator salaries remain so dismally low?
    You know, I completely agree with this sentiment and the line of thought that it follows. If you want more nurse educators, you have to raise their pay. I'm sure it's much more easily said than done, but still, it's what's going to have to happen. Make it to where they average at least 75K/ yr, and I'd be willing to bet that the MSNE programs would become flooded en masse.
    VickyRN likes this.
  9. 6
    The first intervention should be to start shuttering nursing schools, there are WAY WAY WAY too many
    whichone'spink, mystory, hope3456, and 3 others like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    The first intervention should be to start shuttering nursing schools, there are WAY WAY WAY too many
    Tell that to the hundreds of qualified students in my state (North Carolina) who either can't get into a nursing program, due insufficient seats, or have to wait up to 5 years to get into a program. And yes, there are new grad RN positions available in North Carolina. The main reason these programs do not have enough space and are turning away students or requiring some students to wait for years is lack of qualified faculty.

    If you wish to discuss the impending demographically based nursing shortage due to an aging nurse workforce and the aging Boomer patient population (silver tsunami) who will need greatly expanded acute and long-term care health and social services for at least the next 4 decades, then that is the subject of another thread.


Top