Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves! - page 5

Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions. Let me introduce myself: I have been an... Read More

  1. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Well what type of nurse educators are we talking about?

    I'm a Peritoneal Dialysis Nurse Educator. I teach pts to do their own peritoneal dialysis treatments.
    Any and all nurse educators are welcome! It is amazing the variety and endless opportunities that are present with nursing; this is one of the qualities that I love about nursing. Again, welcome to the forum. Hope you come here often to post.
  2. by   VickyRN
    It amazes me how little nurse educators want to network. I find it to be one of the largest dilemmas in nursing curriculum and science today.
    Hoping to ameliorate this in a small way with this forum. BTW, welcome back, Barb! I have missed you. The "Tips for New Nurse Educators" thread or "Care Plans vs Concept Mapping" sure could use some of your expertise.
  3. by   VickyRN
    This is my dilemma currently. How are we as nurse educators supposed to assist these new graduate nurses to cope with this current nurse practice situation? I am not sure how many nurse educators remain in practice, but from what I have seen in the midwest, it is very challenging even at my level of expertise and education. Many educators that I know choose to stay away from practice for this very reason. When I think about my students who will soon graduate, I know what they are facing and it saddens me. I would like to help them in this new journey, but I also know that they just have to do it...get the experience and realize that nursing education is lifelong learning. I pray that I have assisted them in coping with this real world of nursing.
    Very good question, Barb, and one I agonize over. I tend to be very protective of our soon-to-be graduates or new nurses. Throughout the program, every step of the way, I try to present a realistic viewpoint of the practice environment. I emphasize that the patient is always central, no matter what, and how vitally important our role of patient advocate is. The nurse is the last "check and balance" for the patient, and our advocacy often makes the difference between life or death, or a great outcome versus a lifetime of disability. Often, this advocacy is not recognized nor appreciated, and in many cases the nurses are penalized for doing what is right for the patient.
    I also counsel my students to be business savvy, to use the nursing shortage (crisis?) to their advantage and to be VERY choosy where to practice upon graduation. I warn my students NOT to go to certain floors or hospitals. I certainly don't want to see my students becoming burned out in their first one or two years of practice due to a horrible and unsafe working environment.
  4. by   limandri
    I have been a nurse educator for many years and looking to retire in about 5-6 yrs. Have taught mostly BS undergrads and MS psych mental health. Lately I've been excited about teaching web based courses. Like developing them in such a way that they are friendly and human in spite of the technology.

    My question to those who have done web based courses: what do you like and dislike about these courses? I'd like feedback that isn't tied to course evaluations or teacher evaluations, i.e., the stark truth. I'm especially interested in ways to improve this teaching method.

    Thanks for your help.
  5. by   VickyRN
    Quote from lisajy
    Hi to all nurse educators. I have been teaching for one year in a state college in WNY. I graduated from this program so it is special to me. I have my MSN and am a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. It was a difficult year as I had little teaching experience and was kind of thrown in there. I had a lot of support from my coworkers though and I survived. I graduated in 2001 and have mostly worked in Long Term Care and that is my true love, working with the elderly. I have just decided to stay for another year despite having financial difficulties in repaying my substantial eduation debt. We are experiencing a shortage of nurse educators and I would love to hear from others with the same concerns. There are many programs now to help new nurses who decide to go on a education track but I have found nothing to help someone who worked for a few years then decided to teach. I just turned down another position to practice as a NP for a much larger salary. I hope to hear from other educators about my concerns.
    Welcome to the Forum. I, too, was "thrown in" to teaching my first year and learned with the sink-or-swim approach. Glad you are in a supportive environment--this makes all the difference in the world. We are having a near critical shortage of nurse educators here in NC, and monies are available here for nurses (both new nurses and those with experience) to pursue the nursing education route in nursing Masters programs. It is frustrating that nurse educators are not recognized with the financial remuneration that we deserve. Not only do NP's, CNS, CNM and others make well over $20-30,000/ year than nurse educators, but the students we graduate often make more money starting out than we do!
  6. by   VickyRN
    Quote from limandri
    I have been a nurse educator for many years and looking to retire in about 5-6 yrs. Have taught mostly BS undergrads and MS psych mental health. Lately I've been excited about teaching web based courses. Like developing them in such a way that they are friendly and human in spite of the technology.

    My question to those who have done web based courses: what do you like and dislike about these courses? I'd like feedback that isn't tied to course evaluations or teacher evaluations, i.e., the stark truth. I'm especially interested in ways to improve this teaching method.

    Thanks for your help.
    Just want to pop in to say welcome! I have never taught a web-based course (only web-enhanced). I am sure there are others out there who can help you. Anyone?
  7. by   profjanmc
    Hi,
    Just intro....
    I teach OB clinical at CSU, Sacramento. I have been teaching as a part-time faculty for about 12 or so years.....
  8. by   lisajy
    Quote from VickyRN
    Welcome to the Forum. I, too, was "thrown in" to teaching my first year and learned with the sink-or-swim approach. Glad you are in a supportive environment--this makes all the difference in the world. We are having a near critical shortage of nurse educators here in NC, and monies are available here for nurses (both new nurses and those with experience) to pursue the nursing education route in nursing Masters programs. It is frustrating that nurse educators are not recognized with the financial remuneration that we deserve. Not only do NP's, CNS, CNM and others make well over $20-30,000/ year than nurse educators, but the students we graduate often make more money starting out than we do!
    Yes, it does make it difficult to advise students to consider education when they can make much more in practice. Our rural hospitals are are also losing our students to larger cities that offer great sign on bonuses and better salaries. Students seem to assume that their instructors are very well paid but after graduation want to be out there working not back in college. Little do they know that they make more than those who teach them when they get their first position. We continue to advertise for new educators but get few replies. Those that do reply and come to interview usually run when they see the salary and continue to practice. We will have to use adjuncts to piece together the program and for clinical instruction. It doesn't help our students much to have those who aren't on campus full-time. I don't have the answers to this shortage but will continue to work for a resolution.
  9. by   vickynurse
    I also feel bad about sending my new grads into practice. In my 29 years of practice, it's never been this bad at the bedside. I stress over and over again that nursing is a very hard job physically, emotionally, and intellectually. I encourage students to develop some real and meaningful stress reduction skills.

    It is very disheartening to receive such low pay in nursing education. Furthermore, educational expenses are often reimbursed by employers in health care, but nurse educators receive very little assistance.
  10. by   vickynurse
    I wonder if others have had the same experience as I and how you handle it. Almost every clinical day either myself or a student finds a med error made by staff. I've gone to numerous clinical agencies and find this same type of problem everywhere. Most of them are directly related, in my opinion, to nurses caring for too many patients and so they are not checking or thinking about "WHY is this pt on this med?"

    When we find an error, I usually approach the charge nurse discreetly and allow him/her the opportunity to handle the calls, reports, etc. I just hate when it is brushed under the rug and not dealt with correctly. I just hope to continue having positive working relationships with staff, but it can become challenging when this is a daily/weekly occurence.

    Do you think I should be documenting these situations myself? Note that the student did not actually make the error, s/he just found and reported the error. Comment please!
  11. by   gerinurse10
    Hello! Quick question: Do you think that nursing educator salaries will be on the rise due to the shortage? Is the shortage peeking now or will you see it get worse in the future? I am presently enrolled in a MSN education program (2007 graduate?) and hope to teach when I get out. I have looked at the help wanted ads and don't really see many open positions. Where are they and for what specialty? My specialty is community health and geriatrics, do you think I will eventually need a PhD to get a full time position? Thanks
  12. by   vickynurse
    There are many factors impinging upon faculty compensation. Primarily, that one educational specialty cannot be favored over another. For instance, nursing faculty cannot be paid more than english faculty with similar experience. The facts that nurse educators are scarce and english teachers are a "dime a dozen" are not taken into account at most colleges.

    As for the PhD, if you want to teach in a BSN program it is essential. Otherwise an MSN is fine. PhD's are rare in ADN programs and nonexistant in LPN programs. If you are going to pursue the PhD, I would suggest doing it sooner than later because it takes so long to recoup the investment. Where I teach (midwestern community college) it would take almost 10 years to break even.
  13. by   diannenurse
    Quote from gerinurse10
    Hello! Quick question: Do you think that nursing educator salaries will be on the rise due to the shortage? Is the shortage peeking now or will you see it get worse in the future? I am presently enrolled in a MSN education program (2007 graduate?) and hope to teach when I get out. I have looked at the help wanted ads and don't really see many open positions. Where are they and for what specialty? My specialty is community health and geriatrics, do you think I will eventually need a PhD to get a full time position? Thanks
    I believe you will ge positioned quite well with your geriatrics specialty...as you know there is a huge demand for gereatric nurses. I would think a masters degree would be a great place to start with advanced practice NP you could be teaching, but would have to maintain your practice license. A CNS would be another option that may fit better if you are interested in community health.
    Salaries are greater in state vs private colleges.
    I found that it is most useful to seek job postings via the college online advertisements, look in your state job bank, and other various internet sources. Your local newspapers are usually the last to get the news.
    Good luck., Dianne

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