Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves! - page 15

Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions. Let me introduce myself: I have been an... Read More

  1. by   willie1
    Can anyone recommend online education certificate program(I already have a masters in nursing), for health educator, emphasis on nutrition? Thanks
  2. by   Reassigned
    Thanks for the warm welcome. I am a MSN educator at a four-year liberal arts institution. I am presently on reassignment to get my PhD in Hihger Education Leadership (online- Capella University). Just another indication of the shortage of nurse educators with doctorate degrees. I have education and experience with working with all levels of nursing (NA, LPN, ADN, BSN, and MSN). My expertise is med-surg, float/pool nursing, cardiac-step down. As an educator my prevoius role, before my reassignment, was coordinator of junior nursing courses. I hope to converse with many in the months to come. I am usually online working on my course assignments. I am excited about this new journey in my life.

    Reassigned
  3. by   showbizrn
    hello and welcome to all!

    i started my teaching career on a free-lance basis (as an entreprenuer) whereby i taught rns how to pursue the entertainment industry and on-camera acting training (with a focus on educational videos, public service announcements and commercials that reflect nursing and health-related issues). i later worked on a per-diem basis in a long-term care facility and mainly taught experiential, role-playing courses to the cnas in elder abuse, staff-resident interactions and customer service. i later worked part-time as a nurse educator for a large 5-hospital complex and my specialties were psychiatric and addictions nursing; presently i work on a per-diem basis at the same place. i love teaching and will continue to grow in my role as a nurse educator.

    i look forward to reading the posts on this site and sharing my knowledge and information with my colleagues.

    [color=navy]"registered nursing. the best profession healthcare dollars can buy." (my quote)
  4. by   VickyRN
    Quote from showbizrn
    hello and welcome to all!

    i started my teaching career on a free-lance basis (as an entreprenuer) whereby i taught rns how to pursue the entertainment industry and on-camera acting training (with a focus on educational videos, public service announcements and commercials that reflect nursing and health-related issues). i later worked on a per-diem basis in a long-term care facility and mainly taught experiential, role-playing courses to the cnas in elder abuse, staff-resident interactions and customer service. i later worked part-time as a nurse educator for a large 5-hospital complex and my specialties were psychiatric and addictions nursing; presently i work on a per-diem basis at the same place. i love teaching and will continue to grow in my role as a nurse educator.

    i look forward to reading the posts on this site and sharing my knowledge and information with my colleagues.

    [color=navy]"registered nursing. the best profession healthcare dollars can buy." (my quote)
    welcome to the forum we look forward to hearing more from you as you share out of your fascinating and vast experience
  5. by   jsteine1
    Quote from showbizrn
    hello and welcome to all!

    i started my teaching career on a free-lance basis (as an entreprenuer) whereby i taught rns how to pursue the entertainment industry and on-camera acting training (with a focus on educational videos, public service announcements and commercials that reflect nursing and health-related issues). i later worked on a per-diem basis in a long-term care facility and mainly taught experiential, role-playing courses to the cnas in elder abuse, staff-resident interactions and customer service. i later worked part-time as a nurse educator for a large 5-hospital complex and my specialties were psychiatric and addictions nursing; presently i work on a per-diem basis at the same place. i love teaching and will continue to grow in my role as a nurse educator.

    i look forward to reading the posts on this site and sharing my knowledge and information with my colleagues.

    [color=navy]"registered nursing. the best profession healthcare dollars can buy." (my quote)

    showbizrn- would love to hear a lot more about your experiences preparing rns for acting roles. fascinating stuff!
  6. by   jsteine1
    Recently, while caring for a family member with a new colostomy and a terminal DX, The surgeon called the patients hospice nurse and said he wanted the "T-Bar" removed. I hope that is the correct name for the device that supports the new colostomy and keeps it positioned. I am not clinically current, the hospice staff working with the patient know this etc. The hospice nurse called me, asked me to meet at the home to assist her. When I arrived, she handed me the suture removal kit and said" I dont know how to do this and although Im an RN, Ive actually never seen a colostomy before. "
    I asked if anyone else in her org or her supervisor might be better suited to do this, she said no one even knows how to change a colostomy bag. So I did it and then taught her how to change the bag.
    The question is: Is it a tremendous challenge these days to find clinical sites to offer students the widest possible variety of nursing situations? It occured to me that I was lucky coming up: I trained and worked at a large county hospital and there was very very little we didnt see and work with at least once.
  7. by   Terri W
    I asked if anyone else in her org or her supervisor might be better suited to do this, she said no one even knows how to change a colostomy bag. So I did it and then taught her how to change the bag.
    The question is: Is it a tremendous challenge these days to find clinical sites to offer students the widest possible variety of nursing situations? It occured to me that I was lucky coming up: I trained and worked at a large county hospital and there was very very little we didnt see and work with at least once.[/QUOTE]

    As a nurse educator who has taught in ADN programs in two states over the last 15 years, I would have to say that it is certainly a challenge to provide students a full variety of patient experiences. I have supervised students in small rural community hospitals (30 Med/Surg beds), moderate-sized community hospitals (around 100 Med/Surg beds) and a larger urban hospital (over 200 Med/Surg beds). Each of these environments provide a different opportunity for observing and practicing various skills and treatments. Much of it depends on assignments the student receives, the staff they work with, and their own ability to seek out learning opportunities.

    In relation to colostomy care, unless a student is assertive in looking for these experiences, or their instructor is proactive in making sure they are offered, this is very "hit and miss". Part of the reason is that many facilities today have ostomy nurses who do the majority of colostomy care. In addition, since these patients are in the hospital for much shorter stays, changing the bag is generally done by the ostomy nurse as part of patient and family teaching for discharge.

    With this said, there is no excuse for a home health agency staffnot maintaining a proficient understanding colostomy care. In the program where I currently teach, we have an ostomy nurse come and demonstrate all aspects of colostomy care (on campus). In addition, the students are provided demo stomas to practice changing and emptying the bags. While this does not make them proficient without "practice" on a real person, they certainly know the procedures. Perhaps the home health supervisor could provide such an inservice for his/her staff. A better understanding of colostomy care would provide these nurses more comfort in caring for these patients and reduce the potential for complications that would lead to rehospitalization.
  8. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Terri W
    I asked if anyone else in her org or her supervisor might be better suited to do this, she said no one even knows how to change a colostomy bag. So I did it and then taught her how to change the bag.
    The question is: Is it a tremendous challenge these days to find clinical sites to offer students the widest possible variety of nursing situations? It occured to me that I was lucky coming up: I trained and worked at a large county hospital and there was very very little we didnt see and work with at least once.


    As a nurse educator who has taught in ADN programs in two states over the last 15 years, I would have to say that it is certainly a challenge to provide students a full variety of patient experiences. I have supervised students in small rural community hospitals (30 Med/Surg beds), moderate-sized community hospitals (around 100 Med/Surg beds) and a larger urban hospital (over 200 Med/Surg beds). Each of these environments provide a different opportunity for observing and practicing various skills and treatments. Much of it depends on assignments the student receives, the staff they work with, and their own ability to seek out learning opportunities.

    In relation to colostomy care, unless a student is assertive in looking for these experiences, or their instructor is proactive in making sure they are offered, this is very "hit and miss". Part of the reason is that many facilities today have ostomy nurses who do the majority of colostomy care. In addition, since these patients are in the hospital for much shorter stays, changing the bag is generally done by the ostomy nurse as part of patient and family teaching for discharge.

    With this said, there is no excuse for a home health agency staffnot maintaining a proficient understanding colostomy care. In the program where I currently teach, we have an ostomy nurse come and demonstrate all aspects of colostomy care (on campus). In addition, the students are provided demo stomas to practice changing and emptying the bags. While this does not make them proficient without "practice" on a real person, they certainly know the procedures. Perhaps the home health supervisor could provide such an inservice for his/her staff. A better understanding of colostomy care would provide these nurses more comfort in caring for these patients and reduce the potential for complications that would lead to rehospitalization.[/QUOTE]

    Excellent response.
  9. by   Burle
    Hi VickyRN
    I am glad to find this site and I have already learned a lot.

    I teach in an ADN Program and am also the new faculty advisor for the student nurse association. I came to this site looking for what other nurses and students are doing to help the hurricane victims. I wanted to grab a bunch of students in the community health rotation and go down to the area. Of course, I think that we will have to settle for a lesser role.

    I teach at a community college in Michigan. I wonder if other faculty are getting their students involved in the disaster relief.

    Thanks again for your input and oversight.

    Quote from VickyRN
    Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions.

    Let me introduce myself: I have been an ADN nurse educator in a small community college in North Carolina for the past two years. My areas of specialty are medical-surgical, OBGYN and immediate newborn, and cardiac nursing. In addition to teaching, I conduct clinicals on general medical-surgical, PEDS, postpartum, and cardiac stepdown units. Along with being a full time nursing instructor, I am working on my Masters in Nursing Education. I am enrolled in a fully online curricula and have been very satisfied with this so far.
    I have learned much these past two years but, I have so much more to learn! I look forward to hearing from you.
  10. by   sirI
    Quote from Burle
    Hi VickyRN
    I am glad to find this site and I have already learned a lot.

    I teach in an ADN Program and am also the new faculty advisor for the student nurse association. I came to this site looking for what other nurses and students are doing to help the hurricane victims. I wanted to grab a bunch of students in the community health rotation and go down to the area. Of course, I think that we will have to settle for a lesser role.

    I teach at a community college in Michigan. I wonder if other faculty are getting their students involved in the disaster relief.

    Thanks again for your input and oversight.
    Hello, Burle,

    So glad you found the site and glad you joined us in the Educator's forum.

    My name is Siri and I just started moderating this forum and assisting Vickie.

    We hope to see you often and would love to see some of your ideas. I have several of my preceptees leaving tomorrow for N.O. and two of my NPs as well.

    Please come back soon and post often. We look forward to seeing you.
  11. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Burle
    Hi VickyRN
    I am glad to find this site and I have already learned a lot.

    I teach in an ADN Program and am also the new faculty advisor for the student nurse association. I came to this site looking for what other nurses and students are doing to help the hurricane victims. I wanted to grab a bunch of students in the community health rotation and go down to the area. Of course, I think that we will have to settle for a lesser role.

    I teach at a community college in Michigan. I wonder if other faculty are getting their students involved in the disaster relief.

    Thanks again for your input and oversight.
    I also wish to welcome you to our forum, Burle! Our community college campus is collecting items and money to send to the hurricane victims. Our nursing program is supporting the campus-wide relief efforts. Our ADN curriculum program is so tight, that (right now) we unfortunately have no time to spare to go down to LA or to the Gulf coast.
  12. by   sandra walters
    Quote from VickyRN
    Depends entirely on the school and the way the curriculum is set up. In some programs, peds is integrated with the other subjects; in most, peds is a separate subject. In our program, an entire semester is devoted exclusively to peds. Then, half of the next semester is devoted to OB and newborn. Most small ADN programs cannot afford to have separate instructors for such broad subjects; the ADN instructor therefore has to be a "jack-of-all-trades" with lectures and clinicals. Sounds like you're flexible, so you will do fine. In terms of marketability, there is such a critical shortage of nurse educators now (average age of nursing faculty is around 52)--and soon to be a crisis as the faculty begin to retire en masse. There are not many nurse educators in training to replace them. You should have no trouble finding a job.
    This does depend on the school. I am a beginning PN instructor and we have three semesters of nursing that covers every aspect of nursing and we try to keep it very interesting for the students who most are cna's and seen some bad habits from nurses. we have to change our image.
  13. by   sirI
    Quote from sandra walters
    This does depend on the school. I am a beginning PN instructor and we have three semesters of nursing that covers every aspect of nursing and we try to keep it very interesting for the students who most are cna's and seen some bad habits from nurses. we have to change our image.
    Hello, sandra,

    Please introduce yourself to us!!! Good to have you here!!

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