Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves! - page 10

Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions. Let me introduce myself: I have been an... Read More

  1. by   DukePedsEducator
    Each unit has a specific Unit Clin spec/educator. I am the educator at Hospital Education who ties them all together and helps things flow across the sytem smoothly. Does that make sense? I share my office with the Oncology Educator She does have a lot of experience as well as the ones for each floor. We have to prove our experience in order to obtain our jobs. The communication between all of us works really well. Again, my responsibility is for Peds system-wide. I hope that answers your question.
  2. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from DukePedsEducator
    Each unit has a specific Unit Clin spec/educator. I am the educator at Hospital Education who ties them all together and helps things flow across the sytem smoothly. Does that make sense? I share my office with the Oncology Educator She does have a lot of experience as well as the ones for each floor. We have to prove our experience in order to obtain our jobs. The communication between all of us works really well. Again, my responsibility is for Peds system-wide. I hope that answers your question.
    Yes, it does answer the question. I wish our system had something like that. Too cheap to hire a Clin Spec (we actually have a couple of Staff RNs who have their NPs who would be great at that job). Also, I am getting my MSN in Ed., so I like to get a feel of what Nurse Educators in the hospital are responsible for (like, if I chose staff ed., would I be expected to cover NICU without that experience). I know every place is different.
  3. by   SherryOnTheRun
    It is very nice to meet you all. I would pretty scared to take on Peds too; so, if I were you, I would first find out what JCAHO requirements are for you; then, I'd talk to the floor manager/leaders...they should help you get a good start. In my facility, I am responsible for all the education requirements for all departments. It is just me...and of course it is impossible to be the expert in every single subject. It is enough to boggle the mind. I do all the orientation and education for new employees for licensed and nonlicensed. AND, when we have students they get another type of orientation. Then there is nursing orientation...and CPR, ACLS, PALS, and TNCC registration....And of course the OR needs an updated Hyperthermia study module, and the ER needs an quick inservice on Psy patients and Baker Acts/Marchman Acts....don't forget about rolling out new policy/procedures to the hospital I'm screaming...BUT, I love it all so much. HOWEVER, if anyone has any really good websites out there to help NURSE EDUCATORS OUT,,,,please tell us; I'm always looking for good material, updates, etc. God Bless, Sherry.
  4. by   apemsn
    I have been teaching for 4 years now and honesty is the best policy but don't make yourself look like a dud! I admit to my students when I don't know the precise/exact answer and then help direct them in the right direction or to the right resource to find the answer. I believe showing the student that you will always be learning in this profession is a far better example than faking it or looking it up alone to show the student you know the answer. The more seasoned instructors I work with usually tell the student...That is a great question! Look it up and present it the group/class next week or tomorrow. I feel this may discourage students to ask questions. As a nurse we never know everything...we know have to critically think and where to look it up! Doing this with the student is the right way in my opinion.

    Quote from Kokomo
    Thank you for the replys. This is my first teaching position, should I choose to except it. It is a ADN program. I will do clinical instructing with 1st and 2nd year students. Even though I have had alot of experience with hospital nursing I must confess, I am a bit nervous. Always wondering when the question will come that I do not know the answer to. Being the honest smuck that I am, I will tell them that I will have a complete answer in detail the next time we meet. I do not know if this is the right response or not. It is just me. My goal is to encourage and inspire the nurses that pass through. We need so badly to have good nurses that truly enjoy and are proud of their profession and the contribution they make to society. I hope and pray that I will be able to fulfill this goal.
  5. by   apemsn
    I am also a nurse educator for a community college in NC. I also teach in the ADN program. I graduated with my MSN from a completely online program (Duke University) last May and I 've been teaching for over 4 years now. I work in L&D at my local community hospital PRN and work full-time at the college teaching the first (fundamentals) and last (advanced med-surg) semester of the ADN program. I love teaching!! I am currently looking into PhD programs to secure my future in nursing education with hopes for promotions.

    Quote from VickyRN
    Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions.

    Let me introduce myself: I have been an ADN nurse educator in a small community college in North Carolina for the past two years. My areas of specialty are medical-surgical, OBGYN and immediate newborn, and cardiac nursing. In addition to teaching, I conduct clinicals on general medical-surgical, PEDS, postpartum, and cardiac stepdown units. Along with being a full time nursing instructor, I am working on my Masters in Nursing Education. I am enrolled in a fully online curricula and have been very satisfied with this so far.
    I have learned much these past two years but, I have so much more to learn! I look forward to hearing from you.
  6. by   VickyRN
    Quote from apemsn
    I am also a nurse educator for a community college in NC. I also teach in the ADN program. I graduated with my MSN from a completely online program (Duke University) last May and I 've been teaching for over 4 years now. I work in L&D at my local community hospital PRN and work full-time at the college teaching the first (fundamentals) and last (advanced med-surg) semester of the ADN program. I love teaching!! I am currently looking into PhD programs to secure my future in nursing education with hopes for promotions.

    Welcome It's great to have you on our Forum! I would like to eventually get my PhD, also, but am trying not to even think about it right now (am taking 12 credit hours towards my MSN this semester ). Am due to graduate at the end of the summer! Right now, I am on "semi-sabbatical" while I am pursuing my masters, but normally I teach semesters 2, 3, and 4!
  7. by   apemsn
    I am to turn 30 this year and I have been teaching for over 4 years. Not only do I get teased from my colleagues but I am younger than most of my students in the the community college program where I teach. My colleagues tell me they'll come visit me on campus in 20 years in their wheelchairs and some are really not exaggerating! As for the students...I am getting older and they are not...eventually I'll be older! Regardless of your age...you are more experienced than the student and you are the older, more seasoned instructor's peace of mind for their retirement.

    Quote from LDMooreRN
    Hi there! I'm Lisa and I was just hired as the new Maternal/Child nursing instructor at a community college in Illinois. I've been a nurse for 6 years and most of my experience has been in pediatrics (kidney and liver transplant, GI and urology). I started out with an ADN, then went on to an accelerated BSN/MSN program. Right before graduation, I was hired as adjunct faculty teaching peds clinicals. I did that for just over a year (while working my other job) and then the faculty at the college convinced me to apply for a full time position after I graduated. So now here I am! And loving every minute of it!

    I'm a young teacher (30) and get teased quite a bit by the older faculty, but it's all good-natured. I have a wonderful support system at the college and am very proud to say that I am a nursing instructor. I sound very optimistic, bright eyed and bushy tailed, don't I?

    Nice to "meet" everyone!
    Last edit by apemsn on Jan 10, '05
  8. by   Carlos Casteneda
    Quote from VickyRN
    Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions.

    Let me introduce myself: I have been an ADN nurse educator in a small community college in North Carolina for the past two years. My areas of specialty are medical-surgical, OBGYN and immediate newborn, and cardiac nursing. In addition to teaching, I conduct clinicals on general medical-surgical, PEDS, postpartum, and cardiac stepdown units. Along with being a full time nursing instructor, I am working on my Masters in Nursing Education. I am enrolled in a fully online curricula and have been very satisfied with this so far.
    I have learned much these past two years but, I have so much more to learn! I look forward to hearing from you.
    do you know any body who has a lesson plan for start of care data collection
    i am a british nurse on a ypd unit with chronic neurology and aquired brain injury patient .i am new to technology and only have access at work
  9. by   pmchap
    Hi all,
    I am a clinical nursse educator - not quite the nurse educator yet - but getting there. My background - a BN then generalist/aged care and rehab nursing while doing a BEd (so if i ever grow tired of nurses I can runaway and teach highschool). Currently a CNE in Rehabilitation and Aged Care. Provide clinical and theory experitise and experiences for AIN's, EN's and newly graduated RN's (begining practitioners). I am not sure what all the equivalent titles are on your sides r thw world but in a nutshell - I help teach from a school based trainee ship program through to new degree graduate RN's.
    Cheers and nice to meet you all.
    pmchap
  10. by   nesher
    I am not an educator ...yet. I graduated 6/2004 with my MN ( allnurses.com doesn't have this as an option I was disappointed to see). Out of graduating class of 27 - 11 folks are teaching!
    I think of it often as sort of the "backup "plan in case nothing else pans out. Currently I am on a LOA from my hospital job and have been since June due to a torn ligament in my wirst and being unable yet to do the physical aspects of my job on a stem cell transplant unit. Today I took what will be a short term job with one of my former professors as a research assistant - doing narrative anaylsis on BSN student papers. To be honest, the research aspect of my degree was my favorite and I find I am very excited about this current opportunity.
    But I still wonder about teaching...
    I live in a major metro area with many choices of community colleges and several university settings - it is almost too much choice. But does my love of precepting new graduates cross over to teaching larger groups?
  11. by   SkyNurse
    Hi Educators,
    I am a masters level RN teaching at a small community college in Deep East Texas. My specialty is Pediatric Transplant and Trauma. I also work part-time in the local ER. I love teaching, but I think it is as much of a challenge as working full-time in the ER.

    I registered for the forums today hoping to find some information about hospital orientation scavenge hunts for nursing students.
    Sky
  12. by   lalorac
    Quote from SkyNurse
    Hi Educators,
    I am a masters level RN teaching at a small community college in Deep East Texas. My specialty is Pediatric Transplant and Trauma. I also work part-time in the local ER. I love teaching, but I think it is as much of a challenge as working full-time in the ER.

    I registered for the forums today hoping to find some information about hospital orientation scavenge hunts for nursing students.
    Sky
    Sky,
    I'm not sure what type of information you are looking for, regarding scavenger hunts. I take students onto an inpatient, pediatric floor. As part of the orientation, I include a scavenger hunt. I have found this to be a useful excercize for the students so they can locate the supplies and equipment they need to care for their patients. I also include the items of emergency exits, fire alarms, code carts, etc., that the hospitals require us to review with the students prior to giving patient care.

    The hospitals do not provide me a list. I have developed the list depending on what is available on the unit and what the students would need to complete care tasks and course objectives. Before the orientation, I inform the nurse manager and floor staff what the students will be doing. I also try to arrange the "hunt" to begin when the floor is not so busy, for example, not during MD rounds. On occasion, I've gotten those "disapproving looks" from students as if they think it is a juvenile exercize. However, the majority of the feedback is that it was helpful for them to be able to locate supplies and equipement before being responsible for patient care. They feel more confident and prepared to give patient care.

    I hope this info is helpful.
    Lalorac
  13. by   nicued
    You are not alone. I also am 30 and also get teased about being the youngin' of the group. I have been in the role of a nurse educator for a little over 2 years now, still feeling my way through it. I work in Ontario in a large teaching hospital with many responsibilities. Sometimes overwhelming, but I really enjoy the people I work with. Great to see such a network!!From all over. Looking back though, I feel I have accomplished a lot, so I guess it's all worth it!
    Pressing on!



    Quote from apemsn
    I am to turn 30 this year and I have been teaching for over 4 years. Not only do I get teased from my colleagues but I am younger than most of my students in the the community college program where I teach. My colleagues tell me they'll come visit me on campus in 20 years in their wheelchairs and some are really not exaggerating! As for the students...I am getting older and they are not...eventually I'll be older! Regardless of your age...you are more experienced than the student and you are the older, more seasoned instructor's peace of mind for their retirement.

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