Level to teach RN's

  1. What level of education does your area/state/province require a nurse to have to teach at the RN level?? Here it is Masters for ADN, Doctorate for MSN.
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   hoolahan
    Same in NJ. Supposedly, there is also going to be a severe shortage of instructors for nursing school as well. Too bad they won't consider "lowering" the standard to us experienced BSN's, at least for the ADN programs, like it used to be. A friend of mine applied for a lab monitor position in a large Philadelphia University, they offered her a salary equivalent to $9/hr!!! What an insult! I would love to teach nursing school, but I won't go back to school, at a cost of thousands, only to take that kind of cut in pay!! That is ridiculous!
  4. by   ceecel.dee
    You can have a BSN here only if you are working on your masters at some schools.
  5. by   schrandt
    At most locations in Iowa and surrounding states a BSN is required to teach an ADN program, and most need to see a demonstration towards the masters.
  6. by   mark_LD_RN
    bsn can teach adn and lpn courses and clinical and if they have 2 or more yrs experience they can teach bsn clinicals only. msn required to teach bsn theory, phd required to teach msn
  7. by   live4today
    Originally posted by zumalong
    What level of education does your area/state/province require a nurse to have to teach at the RN level?? Here it is Masters for ADN, Doctorate for MSN.
    Same as in your state at the time I went to college back in Ohio in the eighties.
  8. by   live4today
    Originally posted by mark_LD_RN
    bsn can teach adn and lpn courses and clinical and if they have 2 or more yrs experience they can teach bsn clinicals only. msn required to teach bsn theory, phd required to teach msn
    Wow Mark.....your state of MS is extremely generous on the educational levels of who can teach ADNs. I can see a BSN teaching at a LPN school, but NOT at ADN/AAS colleges as there isn't enough educational variance - IMHPO - to warrant that.

    My college required Master Degreed Nurses MINIMUM To teach and do clinicals for the AAS/ADN students....that's the way it should be everywhere, but I realize some states are structured differently based on the need for healthcare staff in their state.
  9. by   Wannabevenus
    I'm a BSN who teaches clinicals for an ADN program. I have 12 years of varied experience, mostly ICU but M/S and Float Pool as well. We have a small number of LPN to RN students, and the traditional ADN students.
    Believe me, experience counts. My LPN students are a valuable asset when I have a group who aren't so experienced. But as a BSN, I feel no intimidation teaching clinicals to ADN students. And although I plan to get a Master's someday, I can't see how it would enhance teaching clinicals any more than hard work experience does.
  10. by   globalRN
    If we are talking about clinical practicum experience: I'd take the BSN with a lot of experience as a minimal requirement for BSN clinical supervision. In clinicals, the experience is as key as the letters after one's name.

    I've seen too many masters degree and Phd holders who have outdated clinical skills. I'm glad the trend is now for faculty to have the letters after their name AND current clinical practice/skills. Of course, the fact that schools can't compete with institutions/private practice for wages is another issue.

    My friend doing her PhD at the University of Colorado told me that most assistant professors of nursing make about 35,000 USD/annum.
  11. by   2banurse
    I know that in FLA you need to have a master's to teach any college class (at the community college level). So I guess I'll be in school for quite some time.
  12. by   BRobison
    For any:
    Does the "master's" have to be an MSN? What about a BSN with a master's in education?
    Just curious
  13. by   healingtouchRN
    A local university offered me $17/hr to teach critical care with a BSN & national certification. The schools are really suffering financially (except where football is concerned!)....
  14. by   pama
    In WV in order to teach you must have a BSN with 2 years recent work experience AND within one year of employment you must be actively enrolled in an MSN program. The MSN is preferred, but with so few nurses in a rural state with the MSN, the BSN is accepted.

    Our college just received maximum accreditation by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission and they accepted the BSN faculty since that is the minimum accepted by the state Board of Nursing. We were not even sited.

    I believe the BSN with recent work experience makes excellent faculty, especially if you have good menotring experiences with senior faculty.

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