How much experience makes a good instructor? - page 3

by KayRN910 6,162 Views | 23 Comments

So, just to pick the brains of a few wise nurses, tell me what you think about this.... I graduated from an ADN program last May. One of my fellow students, while in the nursing program, was taking classes to go towards BSN... Read More


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    Yes, a few days. Thats the way it is here (there are nit enough sites/units), and the oowers that be dont see Peds as being that important. I don't feel dissed at all, I just wish we had more days
  2. 0
    Quote from AmyARN
    I started teaching with a little over 3 years of experience. I teach practical/ vocational nursing, which is different than ADNs. I have had no problem teaching the first semester students including clinical. I think one year is a little extreme, but I do not agree with requiring a lot of experience either. If a school requires a lot of experience, they are guaranteeing that only older nurses will teach in their program. I think the schools need younger nurses as well. The minimum in my state is 3 years. Just my
    Define "a lot of years" and "older" please (I'd like to see if I fit the criteria).
  3. 1
    Quote from AmyARN
    I think one year is a little extreme, but I do not agree with requiring a lot of experience either. If a school requires a lot of experience, they are guaranteeing that only older nurses will teach in their program. I think the schools need younger nurses as well. The minimum in my state is 3 years. Just my
    Because you are representing "only older nurses teaching in their program" as a negative ...

    Can you explain why you believe this? Why is having a faculty made up of those with a solid foundation of nursing experience and life experience a bad thing?
    ProfRN4 likes this.
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    This post is a little older, but I have almost 2 years experience in acute care (ER and Med/Surg), with 7 months in community health also. In teaching PN students with my BSN, and I can say that teaching only includes the basics and anything major has to be reported to the RN in charge of the LPN so that has to be expressed to students also. They don't need to know what a nurse of 20 years understands and sees. Simple clues that something is not right, is what's most important for PN students so the RN can follow up. To teach RN students, you need a MSN which I'm working on, and by the time I get my MSN, I'll have 4 yrs experience both teaching and bedside in acute care. I do think that it is crucial to have med/surg experience since that is where clinicals are held at regardless of whether you're teahcing a CNA, PN, or RN student! Too much goes on those floors to not be in tune with expectations and how to provide bedside nursing care in that setting. ICU is another world and ER is too for that matter, because you have experience, but students turn graduates are often first employed on med/surg floors where the culture of the unit is very different that other units. Med/surg FT, one year minimum to teach others how to insert foleys, do dressing changes, vitals manually, and carefully transfer pts is a prioirty for teaching PN students.


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