evaluating students in clinical

  1. [font="comic sans ms"]so i'm doing the evals for my first semester students. most of it is a check off "s" or "u". any u's constitute a failure (no one is failing) it's the comment part that i need advice on. it's rather easy for the stronger and weaker students, but those in between. and another problem: forgive me for being blunt, but a "know it all' student? any advice would be appreciated
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   renerian
    Are you refering to find a way to address the "attitude" that is outside the scope of the skill?

    renerian
  4. by   iteach
    Some comments that I have used for my average students:
    Student delivers safe, competent care (otherwise you wouldn't be passing them). Student comes to clinical prepared.... Asks questions when unsure.... Deomonstrates professional accountability.... Keeps RN and instructor informed of patient's progress. Uses basic therapeutic communication skills when interacting with pt and family.

    To me, if a student is passing, they should be deomonstrating many of the above traits.

    As far as the "know it all" student: Needs to support peers (if they put down peers), needs to works on team-building skills, needs to learn to accept constructive criticism (if you've tried correcting or helping them), needs to be open to new suggestions, needs to work on listening skills.... Then give specific examples, if you can.

    Hope these help. I have my own personal "templates" that I've developed over the years for hlep in writing evals on different types of students.
  5. by   daisybaby
    Other positive descriptions which may apply are 'conscientous' 'demonstrates solid critical thinking skills' and 'leader'

    Know-it-all students may get 'need improvement in leadership skills' 'overconfident' (a classmate once got that one) and 'needs focus on unit protocols' (as opposed to personal, ahem, "experience").
  6. by   BGSRN
    These suggestions has been very helpful. I am also new to evaluations - Thanks!!
  7. by   VickyRN
    Excellent suggestions, all. Thank you so much for sharing
  8. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from daisybaby
    know-it-all students may get 'need improvement in leadership skills' 'overconfident' (a classmate once got that one) and 'needs focus on unit protocols' (as opposed to personal, ahem, "experience").
    i feel like that's a little too harsh (the overconfident remark). i don't know... it didn't really affect her performance, her performance was very average. my dad (who is an educator in emergency medical services) said i should be as objective as possible, and if it didn't affect her performance, don't go crazy over it.

    thanks for the tips about other students...
  9. by   pvjerrys
    Programs must have evaluation criteria for the clinical area that are objective, rather than subjective. Some (not all) of our evaluation criteria include:

    1) Verbal communication with instructor & staff;
    2) Makes clinical decision with supervision regarding clinical prep & patient care activities;
    3) Prioritizes & organizes care & completes in a timely manner;
    4) Meets safety needs of the client!

    Performance is graded according to their "scope of pratice" for that specific semester / module.

    I have given unsatisfactory performances to students who have practiced outside their scope of practice.
  10. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from pvjerrys
    programs must have evaluation criteria for the clinical area that are objective, rather than subjective. some (not all) of our evaluation criteria include:

    1) verbal communication with instructor & staff;
    2) makes clinical decision with supervision regarding clinical prep & patient care activities;
    3) prioritizes & organizes care & completes in a timely manner;
    4) meets safety needs of the client!

    performance is graded according to their "scope of pratice" for that specific semester / module.

    i have given unsatisfactory performances to students who have practiced outside their scope of practice.
    [font="comic sans ms"]while i do agree that they must (and they do) have criteria, my point was about the comments. our criteria is likely similar to yours. i do not have carte blanche in my evaluation process. and i would not (and don't think i could) fail someone because of an 'attitude' that i feel he or she may have. it is obviously subjective. this person did nothing to deserve to fail clinically. i was just looking for a way to keep them in check. and for the other, they barely looked at the check-offs. they were looking at my comments.
  11. by   lisabeth
    In the clinical area, what is the hardest thing for most nurses to do? I am just starting out in the prerequisites, but I am already thinking ahead.
  12. by   pvjerrys
    Quote from TexasAngel
    In the clinical area, what is the hardest thing for most nurses to do? I am just starting out in the prerequisites, but I am already thinking ahead.
    I think the hardest thing for new nursing students to think about is that there is a human being behind the procedure. Students performing new skills/ procedures concentrate their efforts on the situation that they forget the person. Remember that at the end of your hands is a person that trusts you to be caring and compassionate toward them.
  13. by   lisabeth
    Thanks. I can see where that could be a problem. I know as far as taking blood and doing iv's I will be very afraid of hurting someone. Any suggestions for overcoming this fear?
  14. by   pvjerrys
    Quote from TexasAngel
    Thanks. I can see where that could be a problem. I know as far as taking blood and doing iv's I will be very afraid of hurting someone. Any suggestions for overcoming this fear?
    PRACTICE - PRACTICE - PRACTICE. When you are in the lab or at home, pretend knocking on the door, and practice saying, "Hi, my name is Tx Angel, I'm going to be your student nurse today." Say this over and over until it becomes natural to you.
    When you learn a new skill, practice it over and over until it becomes 2nd nature to you. I can't stress this enough. Review all "normals" so that when you hear "abnormal," you will know the difference.

    Once you get over the hump of introducing yourself and you have PREPARED for the clinical area, you will be more comfortable. Your patient will be your cue on where to go from there. Best wishes!

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