Effective PowerPoint Presentations - page 2

by VickyRN 32,504 Views | 22 Comments Senior Moderator

“oh no, not another powerpoint presentation!” you mutter softly to yourself as you slip into a seat in the back of the dark auditorium. unfortunately, your worst expectations come to pass. the presenter mechanically clicks... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from alan headbloom
    Vicky,

    Good tips. One correction, though: sans serif is harder for non-native speakers to read. If the PowerPoint has large enough fonts and sharp projector focus, the serifs connect letters within words together and make them easier to process. It's a conscious courtesy if you have international students or colleagues (for whom the psycholinguistic processing time is necessarily slower in a second language).

    Keep up the good work,
    Alan
    Thank you for this important point. I was not aware of this.
  2. 1
    Quote from VickyRN
    Thank you for this important point. I was not aware of this.
    That's why everyone should have an applied linguist in his/her corner! ;-)
    VickyRN likes this.
  3. 1
    Thank you Thank you VickyRN,
    I have a prsentation Ihave to do and "computers" were not around when i went to school.
    this article will BE SO HELPFUL for me. It has come just at the right time.

    Thank you
    open1gate:typing
    VickyRN likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from open1gate
    Thank you Thank you VickyRN,
    I have a prsentation Ihave to do and "computers" were not around when i went to school.
    this article will BE SO HELPFUL for me. It has come just at the right time.

    Thank you
    open1gate:typing
    You're very welcome. Best wishes to you
  5. 1
    Vicky, it seems like all of my replies to your threads are of the "old skool" mode; I *am* a technophile, honest!

    That being said...

    My very best lecture instructors, in all subjects, used the whiteboard for their lectures. I found this method to be much preferable to the PP-based lectures. Whiteboard (and yes, even chalkboard) lectures had the benefit of being self-limiting in terms of not progressing any faster than the prof could write. These lectures allowed for spontaneous diagram/graph illustrations (supported by an overhead for more complex illustrations). On a more subtle note, these types of lectures gave the prof a chance to be actually "thinking through" the lecture, making it a bit more difficult to "phone it in" vs. a PP-based lecture.

    I realize that I am a dying breed in many ways, and I do support the use of tech in the educational process. Unfortunately, it sometimes seems that tech is added into to educational experience, and kept there, even when the effectiveness is dubious.

    Very good article, however, in making the best out of this medium. I got a chuckle out of the clip art part; I once wrote on the evaluation for a professor, "very good instructor, but someone needs to hide her clip art cd."
    VickyRN likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from psychonaut
    Vicky, it seems like all of my replies to your threads are of the "old skool" mode; I *am* a technophile, honest!

    That being said...

    My very best lecture instructors, in all subjects, used the whiteboard for their lectures. I found this method to be much preferable to the PP-based lectures. Whiteboard (and yes, even chalkboard) lectures had the benefit of being self-limiting in terms of not progressing any faster than the prof could write. These lectures allowed for spontaneous diagram/graph illustrations (supported by an overhead for more complex illustrations). On a more subtle note, these types of lectures gave the prof a chance to be actually "thinking through" the lecture, making it a bit more difficult to "phone it in" vs. a PP-based lecture.

    I realize that I am a dying breed in many ways, and I do support the use of tech in the educational process. Unfortunately, it sometimes seems that tech is added into to educational experience, and kept there, even when the effectiveness is dubious.

    Very good article, however, in making the best out of this medium. I got a chuckle out of the clip art part; I once wrote on the evaluation for a professor, "very good instructor, but someone needs to hide her clip art cd."
    Whiteboard/ chalkboard vs PowerPoint would make a very interesting topic for educational research
  7. 1
    Very good information. I printed it out to remind myself when I prepare PowerPoints for my PhD studies too. Thank you!
    VickyRN likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from edowhitetop
    Very good information. I printed it out to remind myself when I prepare PowerPoints for my PhD studies too. Thank you!
    Glad this was helpful to you
  9. 1
    Thank you for starting this thread Vicky. Microsoft Office is difficult for me to learn and you and the other folks give excellent points.

    Fran
    VickyRN likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    Thank you for starting this thread Vicky. Microsoft Office is difficult for me to learn and you and the other folks give excellent points.

    Fran
    Glad this was helpful to you, Fran. I had to unlearn some bad habits that I picked up along the way.


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