educator pay - page 2

I am just looking for some ballwork salaries and time committments of educators working in the teaching role at the bsn level. Any info would be useful but really interested in starting pay of... Read More

  1. by   nursyperson
    The salaries in OK are in the 30's. Full-time faculty are hard to obtain because of the masters requirements and the salary deficit. Yes, we do work 9 months out of the year, but during that 9 months the work is often done at home along with the school (constructing exams, grading papers, clinical requirements, committees, etc). If you are available to students during your office hours then you are taking more work home to complete. Several of us at my college, have other jobs to make up the differences financially, and also to keep our skills current.
  2. by   VickyRN
    I must respectfully disagree. While this may be true for SOME nurse educators, in my case, I have never worked so hard nor put in so many hours on a job in all of my life! I work a 12 month schedule, as do MOST nursing instructors in our community college (only 2 out of 6 of our ADN instructors are on a 9 month schedule and have the summers off). And, I am making $10,000 LESS/ year than what I was making as a staff nurse in a large teaching hospital. I do this because I love my job and have finally found my niche as a nurse...

    Quote from lizz
    Don't forget that nursing instructors may not make a lot of money, but the instructors at my school get two-three months off each year. So you probably need to factor that into the equation as well ...

    I mean, how many jobs are there where you get two to three months off a year?

    :spin:
  3. by   VickyRN
    in nc, all one needs to teach adn students at the community college level is a bsn. we are still having a very difficult time finding faculty. if one wants to be a "lead instructor" or program director, then a masters degree is required (btw, according to the nc legal code, the masters can be in anything that was accredited, not just nursing).
    i am presently enrolled in a totally online msn-nurse educator curriculum and will (hopefully) graduate in late 2005 or early 2006. it gives me a totally new perspective, being both a student myself and having students under me!

    Quote from alleykat
    i talked with my instructors and was told that they all had to return to college to get master's degree. the program coordinator told me that her and other staff instructors would travel and share expenses back and forth to the four-year college while still working at the community college. you may be able to get a job (with the nursing shortage) with a bsn... but i bet they will want you to be working on an msn.
  4. by   judymai
    Quote from VickyRN
    In NC, all one needs to teach ADN students at the community college level is a BSN. We are still having a very difficult time finding faculty. If one wants to be a "lead instructor" or program director, then a Masters degree is required (BTW, according to the NC legal code, the Masters can be in anything that was accredited, not just nursing).
    I am presently enrolled in a totally online MSN-Nurse Educator curriculum and will (hopefully) graduate in late 2005 or early 2006. It gives me a totally new perspective, being both a student myself and having students under me!
    Oregon and Idaho also have a hard time filling faculty possitions. Both state boards of nursing require a MSN to teach (must be in Nursing), but have had to give exceptions for BSN in some situations. Before I could be offered a permananent position I had to be enrolled in a MSN program. However, I taught for 12 years on a year-by-year basis. For the position I have now, my director had to sent the state board a copy of my overall plan for completion of a MSN and twice a year she sends an actual schedule of my classes.

    Going to graduate school and teaching full-time is a huge challenge. In addition, salaries make it impossible to pay the bills and my tuition so am having to take loans. I could certainly make more working at the local hospital, but I love working with students!
  5. by   VickyRN
    Going to graduate school and teaching full-time is a huge challenge. In addition, salaries make it impossible to pay the bills and my tuition so am having to take loans. I could certainly make more working at the local hospital, but I love working with students!
    __________________
    Quilter, are there no scholarships or federal funds available to help you? I would definitely look into the Nurse Education Act. See this link:
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthread.php?t=70326

    In our case, we have Title III funds available from the federal government to pay for our transition from BSN to MSN.

    It is certainly unjust that you are having to take out loans to pay for your education.
  6. by   NPTeacher
    I have been a nurse educator for 7 years. I started with a salary of 47,500. and after 7 years, I make 56,000.00. I normally work anywhere from 50-70 hours per week, as it's not unusual for me to work 11 and 12 hour days. Then once I drag myself home, I am frequently grading papers or preparing lectures. We are on 12 month contracts and have a very heavy teaching load at least 2 semesters of the three. My heavest loads happen to be in the summer and fall. Spring, I am only in 2 didactic courses, so don't have a clinical group of students. I teach courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Of course, I am also expected to participate in community service activities, maintain a faculty practice (1 to 2 days per week) and publish.

    Why on earth do I continue to subject myself to this? I happen to love teaching, love the interaction with my students, and get such a thrill when I see such fine "finished products" Some of my greatest feelings of achievement is when some of my undergraduate students come back into the nurse practitioner program.
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from NPTeacher
    I have been a nurse educator for 7 years. I started with a salary of 47,500. and after 7 years, I make 56,000.00. I normally work anywhere from 50-70 hours per week, as it's not unusual for me to work 11 and 12 hour days. Then once I drag myself home, I am frequently grading papers or preparing lectures. We are on 12 month contracts and have a very heavy teaching load at least 2 semesters of the three. My heavest loads happen to be in the summer and fall. Spring, I am only in 2 didactic courses, so don't have a clinical group of students. I teach courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Of course, I am also expected to participate in community service activities, maintain a faculty practice (1 to 2 days per week) and publish.

    Why on earth do I continue to subject myself to this? I happen to love teaching, love the interaction with my students, and get such a thrill when I see such fine "finished products" Some of my greatest feelings of achievement is when some of my undergraduate students come back into the nurse practitioner program.
    NPTeacher, let's just say I feel your pain. I still wouldn't trade teaching for anything else in the world.
  8. by   vickynurse
    I've been a nurse for 29 years, with 20 of them in education of some type. Of course I've also worked agency to maintain my clinical skills. I have an MSN and post master's NP. It is very frustrating to have former students making as much as I do after just two years experience and an ASN. Good for them, but does this make sense? It is no suprise that we have a crisis in nursing education.
  9. by   feelingsleepyyet
    Hi, Im currently a CRNA with a MSNA (Masters of Science in Nurse Anesthesia). My question is this. Could I possibly teach nursing at the college level. Not necessarily in an anesthesia program, but in a RN program. Would I need to return to school and obtain a MSN or could my MSNA work for me. Thanks in advance.

    T.C., CRNA, MSNA, CCRN, APRN
  10. by   VickyRN
    Quote from feelingsleepyyet
    Hi, Im currently a CRNA with a MSNA (Masters of Science in Nurse Anesthesia). My question is this. Could I possibly teach nursing at the college level. Not necessarily in an anesthesia program, but in a RN program. Would I need to return to school and obtain a MSN or could my MSNA work for me. Thanks in advance.

    T.C., CRNA, MSNA, CCRN, APRN
    Welcome to the Forum! To answer your question--depends on the state. Check with your state Board of Nursing. Also, query the ADN and BSN programs in your area.
    In NC ADN programs, you would be welcomed with open arms!!!
  11. by   NPTeacher
    Quote from feelingsleepyyet
    Hi, Im currently a CRNA with a MSNA (Masters of Science in Nurse Anesthesia). My question is this. Could I possibly teach nursing at the college level. Not necessarily in an anesthesia program, but in a RN program. Would I need to return to school and obtain a MSN or could my MSNA work for me. Thanks in advance.

    T.C., CRNA, MSNA, CCRN, APRN
    HI T.C. Can't believe that you would really want to leave the lucrative salary of a CRNA for that of an educator! In my state, you would have to have a MSN in order to teach in a college nursing program (either at the ADN or BSN level). This is a requirement of the Institute of Higher Learning, which regulates such things in our state, rather than the Board of Nursing.
  12. by   healtheducator
    Quote from susi_q
    Actually ... I was hired as a clinical instructor, but have been asked to teach a meds class in the classroom this summer. (Yes, I only have a BSN and have no intention of going on at this time). You are right though that in order to be full time faculty, you need the Masters or more.
    D

    Do you need a Masters in Nursing or is in another health field okay, say, Health Education?
  13. by   VickyRN
    Quote from healtheducator
    D

    Do you need a Masters in Nursing or is in another health field okay, say, Health Education?
    This really depends on the state--some are much more stringent than others. You can check with the BON in your state about guidelines.

close