Dress Code for nursing students? - page 3

Our nursing school is on a medical sciences campus. We have toyed off and on with the idea of a dress code for our nursing students, but haven't instituted one. This year, many of our students are... Read More

  1. by   goodknight
    I'm a student, 18 yrs old, and at our school we don't have a specific "dress code" for lecture, although I wouldn't be opposed. It is suggested that we dress 'professionaly'.
    Other's have said that nursing students are all adults. That may be so but some of them don't get it that a bare middrift ect. are not presenting a professional image. I have no problem with people wearing what they want outside of class, or to non-nursing classes, but I think that we are joining a Profession and should dress accordingly. If we have to have a dress code to acomplish that, so be it.

    Now for clinicals we have the 100% white uniform. Looks very nice too. (never thought I'd say that...)
  2. by   KrisRNwannabe
    We have a dress code, for clinical. Unless you do it for the entire university it isn't going to happen. dress apporitately for clinical. ours is white scrubs (that fit properly and are clean, actually they had to remind a student of this, her scrub pants were so tight you could do gyn physical with them on and stains everywhere, pts actually refused to have her take care of them!!), white tennis shoes, long hair has to be up, short nails (light colored polish permitted), one pair of post earrings (don't see why if you had two holes in each ear that would be a problem), no visible facial piercings(i use a small, flesh colored dome for the top of my tongue piercing), no thongs (very upsetting but i have discovered the little boy short underwear things!) and no perfume (i miss my chanel No. 5 on clinical day, i even wear when i don't plan to leave the house!). other than that come to school with clothes on. i don't really care what people wear. I have been known to show for an early class in the flannel PJ bottom things and a hooded sweatshirt. big whoopie. remember we are all people. you might even catch a nurse on her day off looking... gasp.... not so professional!!
    Kris
  3. by   goodknight
    Quote from KrisRNwannabe
    you might even catch a nurse on her day off looking... gasp.... not so professional!!
    Kris
    Yes, but when you are attending class, that is not your day off. They way I see it, going to class is the same as going to work and you should look the part.
  4. by   Kyriaka
    I personally think their ought to be a dress code for all students (nursing or otherwise).

    Every weekday I am given the "honor" of seeing girls and boys with tatoos, underwear showing, tight tops and even tighter bottoms, unkept hair, and multiple body peircings. It is disgusting. No one has any pride in the way they look.
  5. by   S.N. Visit
    If you were to implement a dress code for non clinical days, where would you draw line of professionalism? Whose opinion would make the rule?

    Example... Just yesterday my nursing instructor told our class that she would rather that we did not wear make up at all to clinical, because make up even in moderation is very unprofessional." Now from a licensed cosmetologist's point of view, that statement is the exact opposite of what we learned in Cosmetology College. (Looking professional meant having your hair groomed neatly, make up blended to complement your features, nails clean, (shaped & polished), good hygiene, and clothes clean & pressed.)

    My idea of dressing professional would be business attire, but how could I expect college students to dress any differently than the casual jeans & sneakers when a good majority are receiving financial aide?

    What would be considered professional dress in your opinion?
  6. by   Kyriaka
    soap is cheap. But the only thing worse than a student dressed like a hooker (I am calling it like it is), is a teacher who dresses like one.
  7. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from tanzanite
    if you were to implement a dress code for non clinical days, where would you draw line of professionalism? whose opinion would make the rule?

    example... just yesterday my nursing instructor told our class that she would rather that we did not wear make up at all to clinical, because make up even in moderation is very unprofessional." now from a licensed cosmetologist's point of view, that statement is the exact opposite of what we learned in cosmetology college. (looking professional meant having your hair groomed neatly, make up blended to complement your features, nails clean, (shaped & polished), good hygiene, and clothes clean & pressed.)

    my idea of dressing professional would be business attire, but how could i expect college students to dress any differently than the casual jeans & sneakers when a good majority are receiving financial aide?

    what would be considered professional dress in your opinion?
    i'm no cosmetologist, but if you have on makeup, shouldn't it be that no one can tell you're wearing it? of course, with something like makeup (as far as a dress code), it's got to be all or nothing.

    as far as 'professional' dress, you can get a pair of docker rip-offs at target, for much cheaper than some jeans. same goes for shoes (a-la pay less). but you certainly can't implement this for a nursing program in a college or university setting.

    i think the thread has gone a little fftopic:. by that i mean that i assume we're talking about those who come to class looking like they're going to a club, or to go solicit themselves. it should be a common sense dress code, but of course that's not enough for some.
  8. by   mattdixon
    Quote from Tanzanite
    If you were to implement a dress code for non clinical days, where would you draw line of professionalism? Whose opinion would make the rule?

    Example... Just yesterday my nursing instructor told our class that she would rather that we did not wear make up at all to clinical, because make up even in moderation is very unprofessional." Now from a licensed cosmetologist's point of view, that statement is the exact opposite of what we learned in Cosmetology College. (Looking professional meant having your hair groomed neatly, make up blended to complement your features, nails clean, (shaped & polished), good hygiene, and clothes clean & pressed.)

    My idea of dressing professional would be business attire, but how could I expect college students to dress any differently than the casual jeans & sneakers when a good majority are receiving financial aide?

    What would be considered professional dress in your opinion?

    Summed it up perfectly. Most students that I know in our nursing program aren't loaded, or have free reign of their parent's pocketbooks so they can't wear 60 dollar button up shirts and 50 dollar slacks with a nice pair of patent leather shoes to class. If I could afford those kind of clothes I would dress like that every day. As a matter of fact, I like dressing up nicely. But to be quite frank and honest, I don't have the cash to buy those type of clothes, so It's going to be a couple 15 dollar tee shirt from Old navy and a few pairs of 40 dollar jeans.

    The whole pay-less shoe arguement and cheap slacks from Target is nice in theory, but to be honest cheap made dressy clothes look just that: cheap. They also tear up alot easier because of low quality construction and honestly they just look dumb for the most part.

    I think as long as a student isn't coming to class in attire that would make someone think "what the hell" then they should be fine. We have a clinical and community uniform and it works great for those settings, but we can't be expected to have 4-5 nice outfits for our lecture/lab days. That would cost way to much on our budgets... classes and books where I'm at is around 3k a semester as is, and I barely afford that working part time.
  9. by   goodknight
    I don't think you have to dress up or wear expensive clothes to look professional. A pair of clean, unripped jeans with a nice shirt looks professional for a student. By nice I mean no outrageous writting, if it's a tshirt it should be neat not raggedy. Think about how much nicer just jeans, a belt, and a nice tshirt or button up looks compared to sweats with hottie on the butt do.

    I understand that nursing students can't afford dress clothes for five days a week. I am a nursing student. I also think that professional is relative to the position you are in. A CEO might need the expensive suit for their job. A nursing student can look professional in clean, put together clothes instead of wearing frumpy looking rags or night-on-the-town get-ups.
  10. by   VickyRN
    Quote from goodknight
    I don't think you have to dress up or wear expensive clothes to look professional. A pair of clean, unripped jeans with a nice shirt looks professional for a student. By nice I mean no outrageous writting, if it's a tshirt it should be neat not raggedy. Think about how much nicer just jeans, a belt, and a nice tshirt or button up looks compared to sweats with hottie on the butt do.

    I understand that nursing students can't afford dress clothes for five days a week. I am a nursing student. I also think that professional is relative to the position you are in. A CEO might need the expensive suit for their job. A nursing student can look professional in clean, put together clothes instead of wearing frumpy looking rags or night-on-the-town get-ups.
    Well stated
  11. by   cpettit
    my institution does not have a classroom dress code for any student. however, as a nursing instructor, i do feel the nursing student represents the nursing profession whether in clinical or in the classroom. nursing has its' own professional standards that are outside the boundaries of the institution. the student must be guided by these standards and do the right thing. the nursing student wants to be a nurse. the student agrees to abide by professional nursing standards when they are admitted to the program. being a nurse is far more than knowing the content or attending classes. hopefully, as the student progresses they will begin to integrate professional values with their own and begin to understand that they are not setting the standards for the nursing profession but are simply trying to adjust to and learn the standards of nursing as a profession. it is the nursing instructors' responsible to guide the student toward the development of professional values through the progression of becoming a nurse. so, even though our school does not have a dress code for campus, my students cooperate in dressing appropriately for their time in the classroom. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comfficeffice" /><o></o>
  12. by   jmqphd
    I perused all the posts and I believe MY SCHOOL IS THE ONLY ONE THAT REQUIRES THE CLINICAL DRESS CODE BE FOLLOWED ALL THE TIME. Students are not to enter the school if they are not in uniform. (Grey scrubs with school logo embroidered on them.) Even if they are just coming in to have a conference with the instructor, they have to be in uniform.

    HOWEVER, we are not on a university campus. We are a proprietary school. If there is an RT, MA, or whatever program on campus, the rules apply equally to all.

    Tattoos must be covered. No piercings. No hats and/or sunglasses. White shoes closed toe and heel. Clean shoe laces. Scrubs must fit. No flesh showing (as in at mid-drift). No thongs showing when bending over. Bottoms of pants cannot drag on the floor. No hoodies. Shirts worn under the scrubs must be grey or white. Hair color has to be some color known to nature. Hair up and neat, off the face. Nails w/out polish, short and clean. No perfume.

    Faculty are held to a strict dress code. Business attire, clean lab coat, name tag, no perfume, nothing extreme. In the clinical area, several faculty have decided to wear total white. We stand out and our role is self-evident.

    We are a new school in the community as because we are private, we are growing like topsy. The state supported schools are having cut-backs. Our students are becoming very visible in the clinical settings and we are getting many kudos on our "professionalism".

    We have more applicants than we can handle, our students' ages cross generational lines. I have one student who is the same age as the grandfathers of our just-out-of-high-school students. No one complains that they are being treated like children. Everyone knows the rules when they enter.
  13. by   ProfRN4
    Since this is an old thread (and I didn't even look to see what my post was) I will update to add:

    My former place of employment finally implemented a dress code for the classroom. They wear clinical attire. Unfortunately, they don't take it to the full extent (hair, shoes, etc. They really do look silly with their scrubs and Uggs). While the uniform thing in the classroom is weird, it does put everyone on the sane playing field. It reminds them all that we ate all (supposed to be) professionals, and are here for the purpose of learning.

    I have since changed schools, where is no lecture dress code. It doesn't seem as problematic as in the other school though. For SIM lab, they must weAr uniforms, with gaur and jewelry restrictions enforced.

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