Dress Code for nursing students? - page 2

Our nursing school is on a medical sciences campus. We have toyed off and on with the idea of a dress code for our nursing students, but haven't instituted one. This year, many of our students are... Read More

  1. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from skm-nursiepooh
    and will add that it's been my observation that graduate nursing students always dress appropriately whether in class or on the clinical floors. they're almost always treated as colleagues & not just students by the instructors as well.

    one can sum it up to them already being professional nurses returning for more education. i just wish the undergrad students would take notice & learn something from the graduate nursing students.

    cheers!
    moe
    you're absolutely right. many of the grad students come to class after work, so they are either in scrubs, or business casual. i rarely work on a school day, but i make sure i'm somewhat appropriately dressed. i have been known to wear a sandal or two, but no cleavage, piercings or tattoos!!
  2. by   hipab4hands
    It would be great to have a dress code, but I can hear the lawsuits start rolling over Nursing Students being singled out.

    When I was in school, we could wear what we wanted during classroom sessions. However, once we entered clinicals, we had a mandatory dress code- no exceptions. We did have to wear white nursing pants and tops, white shoes, and white lab coats. No street clothes of any kind were allowed. No visable panty lines were allowed either. One of my fellow students wore a pair of black underwear , which were clearly visable under the white pants. She was sent home and told to come back to clinicals appropriately dress.

    We could only wear 1 pair of stud earrings, tattoos had to be covered, and those folks with long hair had to pull their hair back into a bun or pony tail. Fingernails had to be cut short- no fake nails were allowed.
  3. by   PennyLane
    I'm sorry, but I would never give my $$ to a school that's going to tell me what I can and cannot wear in lecture. Puh-lease. I had enough of that (12 years to be exact) in grade school and high school in my little blue uniform. I guess at my school we're all pretty middle of the road, dress wise. Since most of us are over 25 and many much older than that, we tend to dress rather conservatively compared to what others have said here. No cleavage or midriff showing. Most people just throw on what they have available, whether it be sweats or jeans and t-shirt.
  4. by   Rhoresmith
    I find the biggest problem in the classroom is the girls and one guy who wears enough perfume/cologne to stink up the room and with no windows this is a problem. I have ended up with more than one headache over this. We stopped one girl by telling her hey could you cut down on this because we have to sit in the room with you and it stinks She was insulted but she stopped wearing it
  5. by   Brickman
    When I think back on some of the outfits my eyes were assaulted with during nursing school I find myself thinking that a dress code of some kind would have been nice. One particular girl looked like she stole ABBA's stage wardrobe.
  6. by   ProfRN4
    So I stopped in on my floor (had to go to a class) and there were like 10 new faces on the floor. No, not orientees, but students. Problem was, you couldn't tell them from the nurses. They were wearing whatever they wanted. Ive also seen some stusents, in any colored scrubs, with their school patch safety pinned on to their shoulder (you could hardly see it over the design of the shirt). I know those pinstripe student uniforms are cheesy, but what about just white? And I know students do not want to stand out. I think that the patients should know who the students are and who the actual nurses are.

    Which brings me to my next beef... You can't even tell who the nurses are anymore, as opposed to the NAs, housekeeping, Unit clerks, and residents. That really bothers me. And as a patient or parent, that would really other me. We really should stand apart from the rest of the system (and no, I don't mean by wearing caps!!)
  7. by   NPTeacher
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    So I stopped in on my floor (had to go to a class) and there were like 10 new faces on the floor. No, not orientees, but students. Problem was, you couldn't tell them from the nurses. They were wearing whatever they wanted. Ive also seen some stusents, in any colored scrubs, with their school patch safety pinned on to their shoulder (you could hardly see it over the design of the shirt). I know those pinstripe student uniforms are cheesy, but what about just white? And I know students do not want to stand out. I think that the patients should know who the students are and who the actual nurses are.

    Which brings me to my next beef... You can't even tell who the nurses are anymore, as opposed to the NAs, housekeeping, Unit clerks, and residents. That really bothers me. And as a patient or parent, that would really other me. We really should stand apart from the rest of the system (and no, I don't mean by wearing caps!!)
    In the clinical area, our students wear white uniforms with the school patch on their left shoulder. Over the left breast pocket, they wear a school issued name pin with the school logo followed by their name. Under their name is their title (Nursing Student). The uniforms are all alike and are ordered through our campus bookstore. Shoes are solid white, enclosed shoes. White lab coats with a school patch on the left shoulder may also be worn. The only exception is in clinical areas that require scrub suits (labor & delivery, NICU, newborn nursery, and surgery) All other units allow them to come in their school uniform. So - our nursing students are readily visible as nursing students. Unfortunately, I can't say the same for RNs, LPNs, CNAs, lab personnel, and housekeepers on the units.
  8. by   mariedoreen
    No dress code for lectures, dress code for clinicals that is typical of what has been described above, and that same dress code must be adhered to for on-campus lab sessions as well.
  9. by   SarasotaRN2b
    I guess I am in the minority, but I think that a dress code (maybe scrubs in a nice color) would actually give me a sense of pride that I'm in the nursing program and proud of it. Usually the only ones you see in a dress code are the dental hygenist students or the radiography students. You see them in the cafeteria,sitting together and sharing conversations and I think that is great. Okay, maybe it is cliquish (sp?), but so what? like I said, I definitely would be very proud when I do get into the nursing program and if there is a special dress code, all the more for it.
  10. by   z's playa
    For our clinicals at the local elementary schools we have to wear the whole shebang. Long white lab coats with name pins....scrubs and white shoes.
  11. by   pmchap
    dress code or uniform? There is a distinct difference between a smart & casual dress coade that allows people choice without compromising a standard and the enforcement of a uniform. During a clinical session the use of uniform is one way to ensure that there is identification (name badges work until there is an emergency and no one has time to look at a badge). Knowing what a candy striper can do vrs the green scrubs vrs the white coats is an easy identifier. Currently I educate in an area that has a corporate wardbrobe (lots of choice mind you) which means that the RNs can be wearing a dozen different things - and the ward clerks can be wearing the same thing. I pity the casual staff walking through the door to work a short shift - it is just confusion asking for mistakes to happen.

    During lectures & on campus - yes nursing students are adults - so lets treat them like adults. The 18yr olds still trying to let the world know they exists will occassionally cause a stir and show some skin, a new tat or piercing - but as has been mentioned by the time they are about 6months from finishing - they have usually worked out that the impressions they give lecturers often effect how they perform in looking for work. (how many lecturers provide the initial references for new nurses!!)

    A sideline - one nursing school here in Australia had a bit of a dilemma with dress issues. They decided that they would shock all the students for a class. (dont try it now - it would never get through ethics). For one of the lab classes the whole session was about personal exposure and privacy. All the students and the lecturer (not me) stripped down to underwear for the session. I understand from a student in the class that - yes there were a few looks here and there initially but fairly quickly everyone just worked out that so be it - the learning outcome - most of the students realised that as nurses their experiences would be totally different to that of others, they respected the feelings of their patients much more in relation to privacy and believe it or not the dress issue wasnt a problem - suddenly having a bare midriff, or cleavage wasn't an issue and rarely happened.

    Cheers

    ps You should remember that I am in Australia and half the students in the class would usually wearless (ie show more) at the beach during summer than they did during the class.
  12. by   carolynd
    Very interesting discussion. I am not sure I understand why we are having the discussion. I belong to a community college and we have a nursing education department. The belief of the nursing faculty is to present professionalism (including dress) in the classroom. How our students attire is their business except when in clinical agencies on school business. When in clinical agencies our students are expected to be in appropriate - approved attire - this means approved uniform, dress slacks/dress with approved warm up jacket or white lab coat and photo school ID. I think the bigger issue is "do instructors need to model professionalism when in the classroom".
  13. by   akcarmean
    Quote from sarah, rnbscn
    for class: as long as they are dressed appropriately. no shirts that are suggestive or abusive language.

    clinical: they wear solid blue scrub set with the school crest on their upper arm, name tag and hair tied up if length permits, no perfume, no jewelry and no long or artificial nails, no nail polish, facial piercing only if culturally and no other piercings visible.

    i can scan you a copy and send one via your email address, let me know.
    when i was in lpn school the info above applied for us except we had more like a royal blue top and white pants. that's the only difference of those listed above. when we were in lecture we could wear just about anything we wanted. jeans, shorts, sweat pants, t-shirts, but they had to be conservative (sp) no clevage showing, no short skirts. but come clincial time was a total differnet ballgames.


    angie
    Last edit by akcarmean on Feb 27, '05

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