Desired Characteristics of Effective Nurse Educators - “My Ideal Nursing Instructor” - page 4

by VickyRN 46,137 Views | 35 Comments Senior Moderator

as nurse faculty, we constantly strive to be the most effective instructors that we can be. the effective nurse educator, whether operating in the clinical setting or classroom, must demonstrate astute interpersonal skills,... Read More


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    Thank you Vicky for the clear and comprehensive breakdown of characteristics/competencies desired in an ideal nursing instructor. Adult education contains many crucial underlying aspects which influence motivation, learning and asimilation. The profile of nurses today covers a vast range from new grad to mature, experienced individuals-some desirous of a career change to the profession.
    Alongside the necessary competencies in education, the reality of breakdown and classification of competencies or what the student brings to the classroom and working environment would be an topic of research relevant to today's health care system. The need for psychological support for ongoing self esteem and awareness, for all learners is vital to build and maintain confidence in self assessment, a form of *experiential learning* (Kolb) where single loop learning leads to double loop or triple loop learning as knowledge is reinforced in practice. I think that this is a vital aspect in nursing education as real gaps can exist between stimulation and application of knowledge, especially where support has been removed. As the profession of Nursing and as nurses, we inadvertently sabotage learning through overwork and the imposed requirement to wear two caps, that of the worker and the self motivated learner often with severely bruised egos and diminished self esteem in the workplace. Today, our challenge is to find a new approach to the profession by first breaking down our own self assessments and behaviours in order to own our profession and maintain a level of excellence in professional service without being willing victims.
    nurseebol and VickyRN like this.
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    Quote from joyouter
    Thank you Vicky for the clear and comprehensive breakdown of characteristics/competencies desired in an ideal nursing instructor. Adult education contains many crucial underlying aspects which influence motivation, learning and asimilation. The profile of nurses today covers a vast range from new grad to mature, experienced individuals-some desirous of a career change to the profession.
    Alongside the necessary competencies in education, the reality of breakdown and classification of competencies or what the student brings to the classroom and working environment would be an topic of research relevant to today's health care system. The need for psychological support for ongoing self esteem and awareness, for all learners is vital to build and maintain confidence in self assessment, a form of *experiential learning* (Kolb) where single loop learning leads to double loop or triple loop learning as knowledge is reinforced in practice. I think that this is a vital aspect in nursing education as real gaps can exist between stimulation and application of knowledge, especially where support has been removed. As the profession of Nursing and as nurses, we inadvertently sabotage learning through overwork and the imposed requirement to wear two caps, that of the worker and the self motivated learner often with severely bruised egos and diminished self esteem in the workplace. Today, our challenge is to find a new approach to the profession by first breaking down our own self assessments and behaviours in order to own our profession and maintain a level of excellence in professional service without being willing victims.
    Thank you for a very enlightening post, joyouter. Affective components (such as motivation, confidence, self-esteem, perception, and support) exert such a critical influence on the teaching-learning process. And these are often underestimated or left out of the equation entirely. And yes, we need to avoid the draconian demands of additive curricula, to stop overloading the learners with too much information. I agree, also, that we need to take ownership of our profession and our professional work environments. Others have dictated to nursing for too long, what nursing should be and how nursing should operate.
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    [quote=Pepsi_Girl;3716358]Teach us with real life experiences and stories. We will remember that. Just reading us a powerpoint that we can read for our self doesn't work and it is boring. Engage us in conversations and debates and be willing to except another point of view. Yes even educators can get stuck in their own preferences at time. Ex. breastfeeding is the best versus bottle feeding.
    Spoken like a typical nursing student. Just one thing to note... yes, scenerios are nice and are a lot of fun after you learn the basics and the normals.... Nursing is learning to recognize the normals vs the abnormals; then planning your care to met the patient's needs. As an instructor that has taught all levels of nursing, I have to say that too many students think they can learn best with scenerios and don't bother to memorize the normal values. Nursing is great fun and very rewarding but it is not all "codes" and "abnormals"; sometimes it is just caring and being there. Watching and waiting. Doing tasks.... Yes, I give lots of examples and tell lots of stories when I teach and never get a bad evaluation from the students--- but the message needs to go out that all students gets what they want out of classes. I see the first semester instructors getting beat up by evaluations all the time because the newest students have a hard time believing that not all people are ment to be a nurse... It takes a very special heart to care that much.
    twokidsandahusband and VickyRN like this.
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    Quote from dream a dream
    Nursing is learning to recognize the normals vs the abnormals; then planning your care to met the patient's needs. As an instructor that has taught all levels of nursing, I have to say that too many students think they can learn best with scenerios and don't bother to memorize the normal values. Nursing is great fun and very rewarding but it is not all "codes" and "abnormals"; sometimes it is just caring and being there. Watching and waiting. Doing tasks.... Yes, I give lots of examples and tell lots of stories when I teach and never get a bad evaluation from the students--- but the message needs to go out that all students gets what they want out of classes. I see the first semester instructors getting beat up by evaluations all the time because the newest students have a hard time believing that not all people are ment to be a nurse... It takes a very special heart to care that much.
    Thank you for your insightful post, dream a dream, and welcome to allnurses!
    joyouter likes this.
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    Quote from harleyridingirl
    My favorite instructors so far have been enthusiatic. I actually felt like they really wanted me to learn and were happy when it was evident I was "getting it". The older women that had been nurses for years "have seen it all, done it all and know who I am". That's not true. I've been working since I was 15, owned my own business, raised my children, have grandchildren and made straight A's to get into nursing school. Some instructors treat us like young children who need to be reminded to behave. Why not treat us like the hard working students we are? Nursing is the hardest thing I've ever done in school and as a life long learner at 51 that says a lot. I think instructors should treat students with a little more respect because we worked hard to get in or you wouldn't have picked us. We don't know much but that's what we are counting on you to do, teach us. We want to learn. We want to do it right. There is so much stress to be perfect and some are struggling just to pass. Some people just dismiss us because we are nursing students but just think, we may be your nurse some day!
    I could not have said this better myself. Some of the instructors that I have had so far have absolutely no tact and stress you out more than you already are. They should read the oath they took to be reminded they should do no harm!
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    This article describes well what an effective instructor/ faculty should be. The traits identified here are crucial to the success of learning and teaching process. It apparent that one characteristic might deem insufficient if an instructor lacks one of the others. It is however reasonable to say that no instructor is perfect. Therefore, it is in students' benefit to get to know their instructor and be able to accept and appreciate their good side while learning how to deal with the instructor's other side. This is where the evaluations and office times come into play. They give students and instructors an opportunity to look at themselves in the mirror and be able to progress in their work of learning and teaching.
    VickyRN likes this.


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