BSN as Educator?

  1. This may be a dumb question, but is it possible to be a nursing instructor with a BSN degree? I know the preferred is MSN, but are there instructor positions out there for those of us with a BSN?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    Quote from FroggysMom
    This may be a dumb question, but is it possible to be a nursing instructor with a BSN degree? I know the preferred is MSN, but are there instructor positions out there for those of us with a BSN?
    Hello, FroggysMom,

    Most institutions desire an MSN. There are those who will consider BSN if you are working on the MSN.

    Some state institutions also consider BSN if you have a degree (Masters) in another healthcare- related field.

    Now, you could consider clinical instructor. The BSN is accepted normally for this area of teaching.

    So, you are considering this?
  4. by   Tweety
    Most accredited institution require MSNs to teach. Some have part time clinical positions open for BSN nurses. I know we had a BSN in my ADN program who lead only one clinical group, but didn't teach lecture.
  5. by   FroggysMom
    Quote from siri
    Hello, FroggysMom,

    Most institutions desire an MSN. There are those who will consider BSN if you are working on the MSN.

    Some state institutions also consider BSN if you have a degree (Masters) in another healthcare- related field.

    Now, you could consider clinical instructor. The BSN is accepted normally for this area of teaching.

    So, you are considering this?

    Yes, I am seriously considering it! I am currently in a program for achieving my BSN. I have been involved in adult education in the past and thoroughly enjoyed it. At my age (58) I don't see that I can keep up with unit nursing forever, but I do anticipate working for several more years. Teaching would be ideal for me. I just don't know that an MSN is in my financial deck of cards. Perhaps a bridge to cross when I get there.... I am thinking way ahead. But the question has crossed my mind many times. Thanks so much for your replies!
  6. by   VickyRN
    This depends on your state. In NC ADN programs, instructors can both teach and lead clinical groups with a BSN. In many ADN programs in my area (mine included), the majority of instructors only have a BSN (due to the nursing instructor shortage). By the year 2015, however, it is being proposed that all nursing instructors be required to have a Masters in NC. Besides NC, there are other states in which nurses with BSNs are allowed to teach in ADN programs (I believe Tennessee is one of them).
  7. by   DDRN4me
    I am currently precepting in an LPN program, the only person required to have an MSN is the director. (massachusetts) The RN programs i havelooked at all need MSNs. I too am having the do i continue for MS or not, i am soooo burned out with working and going to school! Mary
  8. by   proRN
    Many LPN programs hire BSNs for clinical and classroom. Also, the ADN programs that are not nationally accredited will hire BSN as well. It is really just the NLNAC accredited schools that must hire MSNs, unless your state bon has additional rules.
  9. by   ProfRN4
    [font="comic sans ms"]i am a year (3 classes) away from an msn degree :hatparty: . i am teaching in an adn program (just switched from adjunct to part time). for once, i am the exception to the rule. there are few positions in ny (nyc and long island) that will hire a bsn prepared nurse to teach. but here's the caveat: my school is not nln accredited. they have applied for accreditation and must show that all of their instructors are enrolled in a msn program. and since it is a adn program, the theory is (at least from what i've learned in grad school) is the instructor should have at least one higher degree than the students they teach.

    with your previous educational experience, that should put you at an advantage. i don't know where you live, but i wouldn't hesitate to apply for adjunct in an adn or lpn program.
  10. by   rhenmag9
    some states/country requires a masters degree or at least an rn, but some institutions only requires bsn degree, i suggest you pursue your msn degree,lots of research and trainings...goodluck and godbless!
  11. by   nesher
    A friend of mine teaches at an LPN program - she has a BSN.
  12. by   AvondaleGrad
    I was hospital based educator for 12 months with only a BSN. I have six years experience in my field though. I missed patient care and went back. Hats off to all the educators out there, its a tougher job than it looks.

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