Accelerated BSN Programs - page 2

by VickyRN Asst. Admin

84,064 Views | 87 Comments

Accelerated bsn programs are an innovative approach to nursing education, available for individuals who hold a non-nursing bachelorís or higher degree and who are interested in moving into the field of nursing. Approximately 205... Read More


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    I am doing my ABSN at Duke starting in Jan. I have three small kids but I won't be working...my mom is going to help me so I think I can do it. ABSN programs (at least UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke) don't seem to be weed out programs- most everyone graduates... I know some people have worked and/or had small children and survived- although I am sure everyone would say to avoid it if you can

    I did my prereqs online and they were accepted at the schools I applied to. I think GPA is an important factor in getting accepted, esp. the prereq GPA.
    >30yrsRN and VickyRN like this.
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    Greetings,
    I am new to this website and Nursing. I completed an Accelerated BSN Program last year and it was very tough. I could not see myself working during the program. It was ridiculous, as far as the time needed to study. I have no regrets as well. I just wish I had the opportunity to do an Externship which was impossible in my program. Other than that, it was an interesting experience.
    VYisgod, >30yrsRN, MaritesaRN, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from artnscience
    Greetings,
    I am new to this website and Nursing. I completed an Accelerated BSN Program last year and it was very tough. I could not see myself working during the program. It was ridiculous, as far as the time needed to study. I have no regrets as well. I just wish I had the opportunity to do an Externship which was impossible in my program. Other than that, it was an interesting experience.
    Welcome to allnurses, artnscience Thank you for sharing your perspective and recent experiences in your ABSN program. We look forward to hearing more from you here on allnurses. Where are you working now? Do you feel that your program adequately prepared you for the clinical environment?
    Last edit by VickyRN on Aug 28, '09
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    Quote from dimcg
    anyone do an online program? are they recognized? any recommendations?
    I have a BS and know I will need some refresher prerequisites as I graduated in 1987 - yikers! looking to go back for nursing and just trying to figure out the best way. I don't mind taking a couple of years to get prerequisites done as my kids are just 3 and 4 so to start the accelerated program when they are in school is best anyway. Any thoughts? advice?
    I know of no totally online programs for prelicensure students with no prior nursing degree. Some online programs (such as Excelsior) are available to transition people who already hold a nursing degree (LPN or ADN) to a higher level nursing degree.
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    Quote from cheertt2
    Thanks Vicky for this blog. I am applying to accelerated programs and I do not plan to work. What do you suggest I try to do to get scholarships and grants? I am trying to limit the amount of loans I would have to take out. Thanks again
    There may be some HRSA grants available, monetary support offered by area facilities/ nursing organizations, scholarship loan programs by state agencies (such as the North Carolina Nurse Scholars Program) or federal stafford loans (you can apply for this as a last resort). You need to make an appointment with the financial aid officer at your prospective school to find out about these opportunities. Some nursing programs offer various nursing scholarships to students enrolled in the program - these are not well-known on the outside. Best wishes to you.
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    I'm currently in my LAST semester of an accelerated BSN program and it certainly hasn't been a breeze but I've been proud of my accomplishments during the past 3 semesters. I graduate in December and I cannot wait to start my nursing career

    When I look back now I truly have learned so much in the short year I've been a student nurse. Of course I still feel like I have a long way to go but my nursing education is just beginning and I know I'll continue to learn more each day as an RN. I am still terrified to think that in just 3 months I'll be out on my own but I've been told several times that nursing school is there to teach you the fundamentals and most of the learning comes from your practice as an RN. But yes I feel very confident that my accelerated BSN program has given me the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NCLEX and to help me become a good nurse.

    I would definitely recommend the accelerated BSN programs to anyone interested in becoming a nurse and who fulfills the requirements for the various programs.
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    I am about to start my second semester of a 12-month accelerated program. It's hard to fathom how much I've learned in the last 3 months. But no one gave me a clue about the extreme physical fatigue I would experience. Yikes! Falling asleep at the dinner table is not fun! Between clinicals, classes, assignments, family responsibilities, etc. there are just not enough hours in the day. I really don't see how someone could work full-time in my program. We just lost a student who worked half-time; she failed out. I don't know anyone else who works steadily in my program.
    FutureBSNurse, MaritesaRN, and VickyRN like this.
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    Hello all,

    I just graduated from Texas Tech's Accelerated BSN program AKA Second Degree BSN program on Aug. 7th. It was a 12 mo. (Aug-Aug.) program. It was very intense and I can't imagine trying to work. As a matter of fact, they ask you to sign a contract at the beginning of the program saying you will not work during the program.

    I have already found a job working in Pediatrics at our local hospital and I am thrilled! I was hired the Wednesday after I graduated. My previous degree was in Biology. I was an elementary teacher for 5 years.

    For those looking for an online program, this program was considered a "50-50" program. At least 50% (actually closer to 75%) of classwork and assignments were online. We attended clinicals at one of three local hospitals for 2 to 3 12hr. clinicals each week. Each person was assigned a BSN prepared preceptor that we worked with throughout our clinicals. About every third week, we would have proctored tests (Med-surg and all finals) at the Texas Tech office here in Odessa. This program is also offered in other areas of Texas, including: Austin/Hill Country, El Paso, Abilene, Lubbock, and Odessa/Midland (where I went!).

    The program was very challenging, but absolutely doable. I finished with a 3.95 GPA. I would highly recommend this program. It seems as though the instructors in the program have every intention of helping you with whatever you need to prepare you for NCLEX. Let me know if you have any questions. :typing
  9. 0
    Quote from LifelongDream
    Hello all,

    I just graduated from Texas Tech's Accelerated BSN program AKA Second Degree BSN program on Aug. 7th. It was a 12 mo. (Aug-Aug.) program. It was very intense and I can't imagine trying to work. As a matter of fact, they ask you to sign a contract at the beginning of the program saying you will not work during the program.

    I have already found a job working in Pediatrics at our local hospital and I am thrilled! I was hired the Wednesday after I graduated. My previous degree was in Biology. I was an elementary teacher for 5 years.

    For those looking for an online program, this program was considered a "50-50" program. At least 50% (actually closer to 75%) of classwork and assignments were online. We attended clinicals at one of three local hospitals for 2 to 3 12hr. clinicals each week. Each person was assigned a BSN prepared preceptor that we worked with throughout our clinicals. About every third week, we would have proctored tests (Med-surg and all finals) at the Texas Tech office here in Odessa. This program is also offered in other areas of Texas, including: Austin/Hill Country, El Paso, Abilene, Lubbock, and Odessa/Midland (where I went!).

    The program was very challenging, but absolutely doable. I finished with a 3.95 GPA. I would highly recommend this program. It seems as though the instructors in the program have every intention of helping you with whatever you need to prepare you for NCLEX. Let me know if you have any questions. :typing
    Congratulations, LifelongDream on your accomplishments and recent graduation! Thank you for sharing your experiences with your accelerated BSN program. Best wishes to you as you begin a wonderful career in pediatric nursing.
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    Quote from MAnders1405
    I have been looking for a change. I am currently a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT), Certified Asthma Educator (AE-C), and a Certified Pulmonary Function Technician (CPFT) Licensed Emergency Medical Technician with both a 2 and 4 year degrees.

    I looked into several of these Accelerated BSN Programs and was very disappointed. One program wanted me to get my CNA certification first. I'm sorry but after being an RRT for 9 years, working acute care, ICU and now ER, I think getting my CNA would be a few steps backward.

    My local university just started an 18 month Accelerated BSN but they will not honor my science classes because they were done at a local vocational school. They were good enough for a junior college to give me an Associate Degree in Respiratory Science but not good enough for the local U.

    So now, I have been rejected from two Accelerated BSN Programs and one program never even bothered to contact me. I will have to laugh if I am accepted into a PA-C program. I have an application pending with a school.
    I know that getting a CNA certification is ridiculous at this point - BUT - it's pretty easy to get, isn't it? Here in Florida, I just took a one week, $295 course at CNA Kwik Track - loved them! - and I am scheduled to take my test Oct. 1. It might be worth it to do something like that if it would get you into an accelerated BSN school.
    >30yrsRN and VickyRN like this.


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