Would I recommend nursing?

  1. 0
    I read many of the previous responses and, sadly, I have to agree with most of them. I have been an RN for 17 yrs. The majority of that time has been as an NICU nurse. I love the babies and I LOVE to teach but with assignments getting heavier and lack of staff, the teaching is what suffers- unless you want to (or are allowed to) stay overtime to chart. I got so tired and stressed out over the politics, set schedules, holiday and weekend schedules and MD's that treat nurses like doormats, that I almost quit nursing a few years ago. Now I work for a nursing agency that pays $32-34/hr and I can choose when, where and how much I work. I even contacted a travel agency that pays a housing stipend, full medical, life and malpractice insurance, even if I stay local. Now I do the same work as before, often in the same unit where I was staff, get payed more and hear "thank you" a lot more. No more politics! I have to provide my own medical coverage at this point, but it's a welcome tradeoff! I would recommend this profession to anyone who has a true vision of what nursing is all about- not much glory or recognition, long hours with little appreciation and low pay but the satisfaction felt inside when you touch the lives of your patient and his/her family is truly rewarding! The media needs to stop portraying nurses as brainless bimbos who are just there for show or to do the doctor's bidding. ER shows alot of the crap nurses put up with but most people really do think we just pass pills and take bp's and then sit around and gossip! Yeah right!
  2. 24 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I have only been an RN for 4 years. I knew that I wanted to be a nurse since age 5. I believe that Nursing is a calling. We are in the midst of a severe nursing shortage. Hopefully there will be a light at the end of the tunnel. I hope so anyway. I figure that I have another 40 years before I can retire at age 69 so long as my health holds up. I am working at a much better facility than where I began my nursing career and the pay is decent. I have to keep my self optimistic to avoid burnout. What can I say other than I love nursing and ther isn't any thing else I'd rather do.

    Kelly
  4. 0
    After 22 years of nursing, I would do it all over again in a heartbeat! I love my job. I love the flexibility it offers. I like the flexibility in work schedules when I was raising my kids. I like the diversity of the profession. I have even encouraged my youngest daughter to go into nursing!
  5. 0
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    I have only been an RN for 4 years. I knew that I wanted to be a nurse since age 5. I believe that Nursing is a calling. We are in the midst of a severe nursing shortage. Hopefully there will be a light at the end of the tunnel. I hope so anyway. I figure that I have another 40 years before I can retire at age 69 so long as my health holds up. I am working at a much better facility than where I began my nursing career and the pay is decent. I have to keep my self optimistic to avoid burnout. What can I say other than I love nursing and ther isn't any thing else I'd rather do.

    Kelly
    Kelly, I'm so glad that you love your work! I pray that people like you continue to provide excellent nursing care in the future. I always wanted to be a nurse or a teacher. I guess I succeeded when I went into nursing. Deep down I know I wouldn't do anything else and I will always use my nursing skills in whatever I do. I guess I'm still burned out. Thanks for the encouraging words to remind me where I came from!: Bobbi
  6. 0
    Maybe you need to switch units? I am switching shifts at my facility, same floor just night shift instead of evening shift.

    There are days when I just want to give it up and go pass out smiley stickers at the front door of Walmart! Yesterday, before the start of my shift, I said out loud in front of all of my co-workers, "today is gonna be a good day!" And for the most part it was!

    Sounds Polly-Anna-ish I know but it doesn't help to go into work with a negative attitude. I am not saying that you are doing this just explaining what I am trying to do to avoid a scene like last week where I totally lost it and started bawling!

    Good Luck to you and keep your chin up!

    Kelly
  7. 0
    Absolutely Not. Unfortunately , after 9 years in cardiac intensive care, cath lab, recovery, I left nursing. Fortuntely, I don't regret it at all, because Nursing was just not the right career for me. I now have my own business, and I have the power to do good things through charity work AND have some control in my life because I AM the administration!

    I would encourage all of you who choose to stay in the profession to stop letting each other down. The most powerful voice in the hospitals and healthcare facilities SHOULD be that of the many--the nurses. My experience was always those few nurses who were unwilling to stand a firm ground against mandatory overtime, pay cuts, benefit reductions, poor staffing/working conditions, etc. etc. and who would "stay late" "help out" "be "on call' "--whatever term you want to put on it. Unfortunatly this kind of behavior serves only to undermine all nurses. 'You are only as strong as your weakest link' is a very true statement. These actions send clear messages to administration that Nurses are not vocal, are weak organizations, and are not valuable assets worthy of their attention. What happens when the physicians all complain about something? They bark loud, they bark to the right people and issue ultimatums, and they bark TOGETHER!

    If you plan to stay in nursing, log onto this website and generate some positive ideas for ways to change your work environment and then DO SOMETHING! Everyone has the ability to complain, few have the ability to lead, and it sound like that is what your patients and co-workers need.

    Make a real change. If you like to do good thingd for people, you should be really happy that the changes you could create have the potential to make better healthcare for ALL people.

    Think about it.
    Ronda Greaves
  8. 0
    I have just spent and hour reading through the replies and opinions expressed by all of you. I spent much of that time nodding in agreement and feeling somewhat (perhaps selfishly) relieved to discover that the way i feel about my job is the way lots of people feel.
    I have been a nurse in Australia for 8 years. I took a break of 18 months to care for a dying relative and people would often ask me whether i would return to nursing. I sometimes told them i would not and my reasoning was the following:
    1. Despite loving my work, i absolutely DESPISE the politics and the *****iness that comes with it.
    2. I HATE how money and budgets come before pt comfort and care 90% of the time.

    So, i returned to nursing anyway, despite my misgivings and concerns about the environment. Now, as i feel miserable and lonely at the end of nearly every shift, i remember the justification for the harsh words i used to describe nursing in the time I had away from the profession.

    But, something keeps me coming back..........

    It's the pure emotion of a heartfelt hug from a pt being discharged after months of care and love from our unit.

    It's the total dedication that some of my collegues have for their job.

    I love being a nurse, I tell people that I love my work but I hate my job......and that's the crux of the problem.

    Everywhere you go, there are people who will undermine you, criticise you, sabotage you and make you feel small. This just isn't about nursing, it's everwhere.
    There are allways going to be people doing a job that they shouldn't.....

    Be it the Nurse Unit Manager who thinks that her way is the only way.NO NEGOTIATION

    Or the semi-senior nurse who thinks it's their duty to relay every comment or complaint they hear straight back to the NUM.

    A good friend of mine told me yesterday through tears of desperation after being attacked for an hour by our NUM that she will keep coming back because she is there for the pt and not for herself..........I think there would be more of a nursing shortage if it weren't for dedicated people like her
  9. 0
    Originally posted by blsternrn
    I read many of the previous responses and, sadly, I have to agree with most of them. I have been an RN for 17 yrs. The majority of that time has been as an NICU nurse. I love the babies and I LOVE to teach but with assignments getting heavier and lack of staff, the teaching is what suffers- unless you want to (or are allowed to) stay overtime to chart. I got so tired and stressed out over the politics, set schedules, holiday and weekend schedules and MD's that treat nurses like doormats, that I almost quit nursing a few years ago. Now I work for a nursing agency that pays $32-34/hr and I can choose when, where and how much I work. I even contacted a travel agency that pays a housing stipend, full medical, life and malpractice insurance, even if I stay local. Now I do the same work as before, often in the same unit where I was staff, get payed more and hear "thank you" a lot more. No more politics! I have to provide my own medical coverage at this point, but it's a welcome tradeoff! I would recommend this profession to anyone who has a true vision of what nursing is all about- not much glory or recognition, long hours with little appreciation and low pay but the satisfaction felt inside when you touch the lives of your patient and his/her family is truly rewarding! The media needs to stop portraying nurses as brainless bimbos who are just there for show or to do the doctor's bidding. ER shows alot of the crap nurses put up with but most people really do think we just pass pills and take bp's and then sit around and gossip! Yeah right!
    I agree with you 100% !!!!! I have been in nursing 20+ years and finally turned to an agency for the above reasons you stated. I refused to leave nursing so this way, i have time for my family, myself and other parts of life.No matter, I would still recommend nursing, but however i do believe it is a "calling". It takes a special person.
    Last edit by nur20 on Oct 28, '01
  10. 0
    I believe nursing is a calling also. It requires a great deal of patience, dedication, respect and hard work. There aren't too many people who could fill our shoes. I was an LPN for 15 years prior to going back to college to get my RN license. I felt I had not fully reached my potential as an LPN and still have a lot more to offer. Prayerfully, I will graduate in May 2002.
  11. 0
    Nursing really sucks at times...but for the most part it is a great career. I love the flexible scheduling so that my wife (also a nurse) and I can work opposite and take care of our own kids (No daycare!) We get to spend a lot of time together as a family.
    Also, there are so many areas of nursing to chose from, if you get bored or burned out, go somewhere else. Right now I am working as a flight nurse which is the coolest job in the world. When I get tired of flying around in a helicopter and saving lives, I might go back to ICU or ER. I aslo do legal nurse consulting on the side (Just for some variety).
    Nurses pay can be pretty bad in places, but with the nursing shortage, salaries are climbing fast! Nurses just need to be more proactive in there careers and when working conditions are unacceptable, nurses need to unite to make changes. Only nurses can improve nursing!


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