Where would a new grad start?

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    I start my ADN nursing program on the 23rd. Immediately after I graduate I plan on looking for a job while simultaneously bridging to get my BSN.

    I was wondering what areas in a hospital is a new grad most likely to start woking in? It seems that med-surg is one of them, which I think would be great to do while getting my BSN. It seems the experience you gain there really gives you a good footing before moving to another area.

    But what other areas tend to be the most likely? Which are the least likely? I know it varies as well - some students really WOW staff in their clinicals or their preceptors and they can get into a great specialty right away.

    Is the ER a tough one to get in as a new grad?
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Most new grads without a residency program start out on a med-surg floor. But, there are numerous factors that can determine where a new grad can be placed. For example: rural/ large university hospital (rural are more likely to give you an ER or L&D position as a new grad), your healthcare experience (if you work as a EMT or paramedic then you can get an ER nurse job) or work as a student nurse in ICU then they may take a chance and place you there because you are a known quantity. Grades and clinical evaluations may help get a non med-surg position. I have heard of nursing managers remembering students from clinicals and if they stood out (in a good way) they would get an offer. Finally, BSN vs ADN (ASN) nurse (not to open that can of worms but it is a factor).
    llg likes this.
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    In my area having a BSN is not a factor when the job is staff nurse. Since, I think, 2005 all nursing programs are BSN but for a hospital job here the requirement is RN, regardless of anything else. Management and some other positions may require a degree but not for a staff nurse. So everyone is considered equal no matter how they became RN. Good thing too because the University programs are not exactly churning out people with stellar patient care skills. Being able to write an excellent paper doesn't help much when your patient is crashing.
    I still stand behind the " new grads need med-surg experience for a few years before moving into a specialty area" mentality. There is absolutely nothing that can prepare you more for any area than the vast experience that acute medicine will. If you can conquer that world you can work just about anywhere.
  6. 0
    Well I would like my BSN because I have always had flight nursing in the back of my mind where having a BSN is required.

    That's mainly why I asked about the ER. For hiring new flight nurses they usually want you to have 3-5 years of combined ER/ICU experience. If I could hit the ground running with experience in the ER that would be great.

    However, I do agree wholeheartedly about med-surg. I volunteered on the med-surg floor of a hospital as a CNA helping the nurses and I loved how busy it was. I also like the various ages of the patients and all the different situations meshed onto one floor. I think having to tackle those aspects makes for a very well-rounded nurse. Even as just a volunteering CNA, I felt like I had a lot of purpose being there. And I can't help but love the craziness and running around and being heavily relied on!

    I was thinking while getting my BSN that working med-surg for 6 months to a year would get my foot in the door in the ER, then working a couple years there would put me in ICU, etc. But I really don't have a clue, at this point I'm merely making educated guesses on what may or may not be realistic. :/
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    All the flight nurses I know have extensive ED/trauma experience. They also have to have Paramedic (first responder) qualifications. On average, they had at least 5 years of experience & ED certified (CEN) prior to cross-training. About half had military experience with medical evac - reserves or regular service.

    It's good that you're thinking this through and taking a very practical approach. Once you get your BSN, you may also want to consider opportunities available through military training. Based on the folks I know, it seems to be a common pathway to ED flight nurse.
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    Quote from HouTx
    All the flight nurses I know have extensive ED/trauma experience. They also have to have Paramedic (first responder) qualifications. On average, they had at least 5 years of experience & ED certified (CEN) prior to cross-training. About half had military experience with medical evac - reserves or regular service.

    It's good that you're thinking this through and taking a very practical approach. Once you get your BSN, you may also want to consider opportunities available through military training. Based on the folks I know, it seems to be a common pathway to ED flight nurse.
    It's ironic that you say that because it was my dream to do exactly that. I am still going to try but it is unlikely for me to get in because I have celiac (already tried once with the USAF and was offered a waiver but it ended up being DQ'd anyway). But it'll be three years until I get my BSN. Situations can change.


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