What Type of Nursing is Right for Me? - page 2

by abeccone | 11,482 Views | 20 Comments

Hello all, I am currently a nursing student in Texas who will be graduating (fingers crossed) in May. I feel a bit overwhelmed by all of the areas of nursing that are available to me and I am looking for some advice or... Read More


  1. 0
    Do you have a practicum experience your last semester where you get to choose where you want to go? If so, try to get placed in psych so you can see what it's like and if you really want to do it.

    That's what I did. I had an interest in psych always, but I wanted to spend some time there (more than a day or two) and see what it was REALLY like. I loved it....just like I thought I would, and I have a job there now.
  2. 0
    Quote from JailRN
    The beauty of nursing is that you can switch 'specialties'. Go where you're pulled. I've been in nursing since 1972, most of it psych. Most pts have some underlying psych dx. Plus, if you know your psych, you'll have an easier time with your boards. As mentioned before, non compliance is a huge problem, but, until they can stabilize meds for 6 months and have an implantable pump, it's difficult for the pts, their families and us! They get to a poiint where they gain weight, or don't think it works, so they flush it, sell it, trade it, loose it whatever! I think in psych, you must learn to think outside the box. What works for one, doesn't work for the identical twin with the same symptoms! The study and treatment of the mind is still in it's infancy. Also, most psych drugs take 4-6 weeks to work and pts are too frustrated! We are a society of 'fix it yesterday'. I'm on a local PET team and I can't tell you HOW many kids I get in the ER! Parents have had however many years to screw this kid up, indulge him, make excuses for their bx, take their side against schools, police, neighbors, relatives, etc, then want me to fix them in 60 minutes!! Sorry, pixie dust was optional with the RN renewal and I chose not to spend the $75 for it! A sense of humor is also important. (In it's place, of course). It helps if you have someone close to you who has a mental illness (and nowadays who doesn't?). Empathy is critical. You'll learn to think like they do. That's scary sometimes! Good luck and let me know how you're doing!!!
    Well Jail, back in the day, changing specialties was a lot easier to do. Today, things are so tight in hiring, it's tough to get into other areas w/o experience. It's the market and cost control right now.
  3. 0
    My question is this. What drew you or what area did you fancy the most during clinical rotations? What kind of thinker and learner are you? What get's you passionate, and what seems like "ey!"

    Shadow areas for more than a day, and see what strikes your fancy the most. Also research the areas and approaches, and see what fits you the best.

    Good luck.
  4. 0
    HI dear,
    Happy to know that you are interested in Psychiatric Nursing.Choose your functional area based on your interest dear you can be a challenging nurse in future no doubts in that.I think its better you do Msc Psychology too so that you can be a good communicator as well as a counsellor for all the needies.The scope is good.Go ahead .Dont be confused.All the very best.
    With lots of prayer
    Sariga
  5. 0
    I would apply on a med-surg floor so you get everything. That way it's something you can put on your resume & you're exposed to a variety cases. From that you can decide where you want to go. I'm a new grad, been a nurse for a year now working on a med-surg floor. Unfortunately, mental health isn't my thing. We often get patients from the psychiatric unit because of overflow. Sometimes they can be quiet but when they start acting up, we really don't know how to deal with them. We have to call nurses from the psych unit to calm them down. But ever since working on a med-surg floor I found out that I'm interested in a lot of things. I just can't decide where I want to go next. My plan is to apply everywhere, anywhere and see which place accepts me and I'll take it from there. Good luck!
  6. 0
    Hello everyone,
    I have a big dilemma here too. I came out of nursing school a long time ago and went into a nursing home because that was the only job I could get because of the glut of nursing schools in my area. I did very well, learning how to manage time and tasks and was made charge nurse on the skilled unit in the facility rather quickly. I soon realized that I wanted to be in a hospital where I could really use the clinical skills I had mastered and applied to the nearby children's hospital that I had always had an affinity for and was hired to a med-surg unit. I loved it and transitioned well staying with that unit for a number of years until I lost a young girl who meant the world to our unit since she spent most of her life in the hospital rather than at home. I decided to transfer to the emergency department where I would not become as attached to the patients and I would use my skills much more effectively. Again, I was hired and transitioned well to the point of becoming shift supervisor. I loved my new position except the paperwork part of course. After a few years, I had a problem with my arm, or rather, my elbow. It became swollen and tender to the touch. The pediatricians sent me to an adult hospital for evaluation after the occupational nurse looked at me and scooted me out the door. After months of tests, I was diagnosed with RSD. Needless to say, that was the end of my career as an emergency room nurse. I have been out on disability for a number of years now but I still feel the pull to do some sort of nursing. I have recently gone back to school to finish my bachelors degree in nursing and believe I can be useful somewhere but I don't know where yet. I was hoping my nursing community would have some idea where I might fit in. Can anyone offer advice where I might fit in? Case management requires experience, chart review? Anything? Please help me move forward. Thanks so much..
  7. 0
    Original poster - my advice would be try and see what happens. If you think you want psych, the worst the hospital/agency can do is say no. I worked inpatient med/surg/tele for a year - and we had plenty of psych (whether it's dealing with patients, coworkers or with families of patients...pysch is abundant in hospitals).

    Med surg is very nice because you get a wide variety of things from patients just barely stable enough not to be an ICU bed (we had a small stepdown unit on another floor, but we got a lot of ICU transfers cause of the assessment skills required for neuro med/surg) to patients much more stable. Med surg is nice because you get to work on so many skills with a lot of both variety and repetition. Where I worked, our unit was the only non-critical care unit to take trach patients. We did a lot of central line care (PICCs, CVCs, dialysis cath etc). It's a lot of skills and a lot of learning to be good at them. The thing that will most benefit you no matter what specialty you choose to go into after some med/surg experience is experience with assessments. I often had 6-7 patients, and at shift change we went into the rooms so the days RN could introduce the nights RN and vice versa - there is a LOT about a patient that you can get from eyeballing them in 10 seconds to a minutes' time. Those 10-60 seconds in the room told me who I needed to see first and if I was comfortable going to get report on my others or if I had a gut feeling that needed checked out.

    I'm in the OR now, and I appreciate having had a year's worth of med/surg experience before this. For so many reasons.
  8. 0
    Quote from lindykid
    Hello everyone,
    I have a big dilemma here too. I came out of nursing school a long time ago and went into a nursing home because that was the only job I could get because of the glut of nursing schools in my area. I did very well, learning how to manage time and tasks and was made charge nurse on the skilled unit in the facility rather quickly. I soon realized that I wanted to be in a hospital where I could really use the clinical skills I had mastered and applied to the nearby children's hospital that I had always had an affinity for and was hired to a med-surg unit. I loved it and transitioned well staying with that unit for a number of years until I lost a young girl who meant the world to our unit since she spent most of her life in the hospital rather than at home. I decided to transfer to the emergency department where I would not become as attached to the patients and I would use my skills much more effectively. Again, I was hired and transitioned well to the point of becoming shift supervisor. I loved my new position except the paperwork part of course. After a few years, I had a problem with my arm, or rather, my elbow. It became swollen and tender to the touch. The pediatricians sent me to an adult hospital for evaluation after the occupational nurse looked at me and scooted me out the door. After months of tests, I was diagnosed with RSD. Needless to say, that was the end of my career as an emergency room nurse. I have been out on disability for a number of years now but I still feel the pull to do some sort of nursing. I have recently gone back to school to finish my bachelors degree in nursing and believe I can be useful somewhere but I don't know where yet. I was hoping my nursing community would have some idea where I might fit in. Can anyone offer advice where I might fit in? Case management requires experience, chart review? Anything? Please help me move forward. Thanks so much..


    This might deserve a thread of it's own, since maybe some who might have ideas for you, won't spot this whole other topic hidden away on page 2 of this here thread on psyche nursing??

    best of luck, though!!
  9. 0
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    This might deserve a thread of it's own, since maybe some who might have ideas for you, won't spot this whole other topic hidden away on page 2 of this here thread on psyche nursing??

    best of luck, though!!
    I agree. Lindykid, repost this over disabled nurses under the general tab. I have some advice for you but can't email you yet due to your low number of posts.
  10. 1
    Anna,

    If you feel pulled toward psyche nursing, follow your heart. I would check the local psyche facilities or even psyche units in hospitals and see if they offer nurse tech positions. I worked as a tech my entire time in nursing school and the experience was invaluable. Also, see if you could shadow a psyche nurse for a day (not sure if this is possible with HIPAA). If nothing else, just ask the nurses when you do psyche rotations.

    That being said, don't narrow your choices in nursing. In my opinion, once you specialize it's difficult if and when you want a career change. I am going through this now. I've been doing case management for so long that I feel immobilized to go into another area of nursing. As you said, there are so many options in nursing, so keep your mind and your opportunities open.

    I strongly suggest the book The Ultimate Career Guide for Nurses by Donna Wilk Cardillo. It's an excellent book for nursing students, new nurses and seasoned nurses. She offers insight and ways of thinking that I'd never thought of, and I've been a nurse for almost 20 years. I call it my career bible!

    Good luck!
    Dawn
    abeccone likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top