Transfer question

  1. 0
    Hi!
    I'm a pretty new grad (just over 13 months), but I'm wanting to transfer units within my hospital. I am having a really hard time with night shift and there is no end in site. Also my unit is kind of a niche (I work NICU ) and I want to branch out into other pedi-type places. Any advice on how to approach my manager about this? I'm feeling a little guilty and nervous about not getting the transfer and then having alienated my unit.

    Any thoughts/ advice?
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I'd love to hear some advice on this too. I've been on my unit for 15 months and would love to transfer to the pediatric unit but I am nervous about the same thing.

    I guess if your (our) managers are at least a little human they will understand why we want to transfer. In both cases we are going to another specialty, I guess to me that is better than going from one surgical unit to the other.
  5. 0
    Don't be worried! I am betting your manager has been through this before and you're anxiety is only your own. Before you ask for the transfer, write down ON PAPER what it is that makes you want to transfer. Look at what you've written and make sure that it's the truth. Then, review it and go on in and tell the manager. BE HONEST, it shows when you're talking to them. There are sooooooooo many nursing possibilities, I doubt ANY manager will be upset (or fellow nurses for that matter). They know how hard it is to find the right niche as I'm sure they had to transfer some to find their own.

    Another word of advice - let the manager know that if the transfer isn't granted right now or takes a long time, you love your job and what you do- You will not just leave. Let him or her know that if it's not granted the first time, you will continue to try as you are searching for your place. I know as a manager I truly appreciate that candor and honesty.

    Shake the anxiety- transferring is normal
  6. 0
    I transferred after 10 months from the ED to L&D. My facility does not require in house references and suggests you don't talk about transfers until you have secured your new position. That being said, once i was hired for the new position i went to talk to my director in person and was very honest and upfront with why I was leaving and was very thankful for the opportunity. I also gave the 6 weeks notice before leaving because it wAs the holiday season. She was understanding and grateful.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  7. 0
    Quote from alicia125
    I transferred after 10 months from the ED to L&D. My facility does not require in house references and suggests you don't talk about transfers until you have secured your new position. That being said, once i was hired for the new position i went to talk to my director in person and was very honest and upfront with why I was leaving and was very thankful for the opportunity. I also gave the 6 weeks notice before leaving because it wAs the holiday season. She was understanding and grateful.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    I wish we didn't have to speak with the manager until all was said and done but we have to "the talk" before we have an interview with HR for the new position.

    In some cases though it can be helpful because I know one person who transferred off our floor got a great recommendation from our manager and got the job because of it.
  8. 0
    I agree where i work you don't talk to your manager until after you have secured a new position.
  9. 0
    I believe that system makes it easier

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  10. 0
    "Smart" managers know that they have to support career development - even if it means transferring to another area. In the long run, its better for the organization as well as the individual. You may be surprised at how supportive your manager is. It is also a major cost savings for the organization as they have already invested in your training and would much rather keep you on board than have to recruit and train another new nurse.

    Always remember to be very positive. It helps to explain your desire to transfer in terms of your overall career development (big picture). ex: "I really want to explore several areas of nursing so that I will be able to make a better decision when I am ready to choose a direction for my graduate education" And NEVER bad-mouth your old unit/manager... I guarantee they will hear about it, and that bridge will be burned.
  11. 0
    Okay guys, thanks for all of the advise, support and perspectives. Ive asked around, and it seems like talking to your current manager first is encouranged so....*Deep sigh* I'm going to talk to my manager tonight


Top